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RE: [jacksongenealogy] Digest Number 653

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  • Richard Matthews
    There is a natural divide, the Cumberland Mountains, that separates the northeastern Alabama border from southern Tennessee. Just north of that border,
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 4, 2003
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      There is a natural divide, the Cumberland Mountains, that separates the
      northeastern Alabama border from southern Tennessee. Just north of that
      border, settlers moved in earlier to claim flat farm land. Franklin County
      is in the area that was settled early on, just north of Jackson County.
      There were trails that lead down into the coves, of what was to become our
      Jackson County area. You will find that Franklin County not only supplied
      settlers for Paint Rock Valley but also for Big Coon and Little Coon valleys
      as well as Crow Valley and a number of smaller valleys in Jackson County.
      The mountain tops were of little use to the earlier settlers who were
      looking for valley land for the growing of cotton and corn. Much of this
      resettling occupied early in the 19th century and by mid-century our county
      was fairly thickly settled. All of Jackson County was open to white settlers
      by the 1830's after removal of the Cherokee.

      A similar migration occurred from Kentucky to southern Tennessee, when it
      opened for settlement, late in the 18th century. Read
      http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature9/migrate.html for some good
      insight into the migration into this area. There is also a great settlement
      map here http://home.hiwaay.net/~prm/ex.jpg.

      Bests,

      Richard



      From: Barbara Duggan Dahl [mailto:bddahl@...]



      I was wondering if anyone knew why so many people who settled in Paint Rock
      Valley came through Franklin Co., TN, but were originally from Garrard Co.,
      KY? Was this a common route of migration in the mid 1800s?
    • Golden Moments
      This is the answer to the nagging question: Where did they come from? How did they get here? Why did they come? What was here when they arrived? Certainly an
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 4, 2003
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        This is the answer to the nagging question: Where did they come from? How
        did they get here? Why did they come? What was here when they arrived?
        Certainly an entertaining answer to an entertaining question?

        Thank you,

        Laura Frazier Golden
        A Frazier Methodist minister of an ancestor Frazier Cumberland Presbyterian
        minister

        I relayed some background on some of my ancestors to my older and younger
        sibling regarding some of their successes.
        They looked at me and said, "We never would have thought it." Great research
        provides great insights into what they were and what we are and can become.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Richard Matthews" <prm@...>
        To: <jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, August 04, 2003 7:09 AM
        Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Digest Number 653


        > There is a natural divide, the Cumberland Mountains, that separates the
        > northeastern Alabama border from southern Tennessee. Just north of that
        > border, settlers moved in earlier to claim flat farm land. Franklin County
        > is in the area that was settled early on, just north of Jackson County.
        > There were trails that lead down into the coves, of what was to become our
        > Jackson County area. You will find that Franklin County not only supplied
        > settlers for Paint Rock Valley but also for Big Coon and Little Coon
        valleys
        > as well as Crow Valley and a number of smaller valleys in Jackson County.
        > The mountain tops were of little use to the earlier settlers who were
        > looking for valley land for the growing of cotton and corn. Much of this
        > resettling occupied early in the 19th century and by mid-century our
        county
        > was fairly thickly settled. All of Jackson County was open to white
        settlers
        > by the 1830's after removal of the Cherokee.
        >
        > A similar migration occurred from Kentucky to southern Tennessee, when it
        > opened for settlement, late in the 18th century. Read
        > http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature9/migrate.html for some good
        > insight into the migration into this area. There is also a great
        settlement
        > map here http://home.hiwaay.net/~prm/ex.jpg.
        >
        > Bests,
        >
        > Richard
        >
        >
        >
        > From: Barbara Duggan Dahl [mailto:bddahl@...]
        >
        >
        >
        > I was wondering if anyone knew why so many people who settled in Paint
        Rock
        > Valley came through Franklin Co., TN, but were originally from Garrard
        Co.,
        > KY? Was this a common route of migration in the mid 1800s?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • Richard Matthews
        There are no simple answers that cover all the early settlers, so we speak and write about them in general terms. We can hardly imaging what this area was like
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 4, 2003
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          There are no simple answers that cover all the early settlers, so we speak
          and write about them in general terms. We can hardly imaging what this area
          was like 200 years ago when the first squatters moved into Cherokee
          territory around here. From letters that were written by some of my long ago
          kin I've found that their hardships were great even 100 or so years after
          those first settlers. I've found that this area was so ravaged by the WBTS
          that hardly anything was left after the war. I know from my own parents,
          that living conditions were not very good for them up through the first
          quarter of the 20th century. Most of my Jackson County kin for the past six
          generations have been farmers. One thing I learned from my Grandparents is
          that in times passed the farm families were pretty much self sufficient.
          They could live with what was grown/made by them or their neighbors.
          Certainly they had to buy some things from others but their lives were no
          comparison to our life styles. And it is sad to say they still suffered
          greatly from poor medical care and diseases.


          Richard





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          This is the answer to the nagging question: Where did they come from? How
          did they get here? Why did they come? What was here when they arrived?
          Certainly an entertaining answer to an entertaining question?

          Thank you,

          Laura Frazier Golden
        • MaryTom482@aol.com
          Thank you so much for such valuable information. I loved reading every word... Mary Willis Drew [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 4, 2003
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            Thank you so much for such valuable information. I loved reading every
            word...
            Mary Willis Drew


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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