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CHEROKEE BLOOD

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  • Ann
    kUDOS to Jerry Triplett for a well spoken assessment of Cherokee blood in Jackson County! For a number of years, I have researched the Cherokee Nation and
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 19, 2013
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      kUDOS to Jerry Triplett for a well spoken assessment of Cherokee blood in Jackson County!   For a number of years,  I have researched the Cherokee Nation and its inhabitants, and everything I have found to date supports every word in Jerry Triplett's last email.   In fact, I have spent a great deal of time the last 3 months researching Sauta and Crow Town in Jackson County between 1785 and 1819.   I am now in the process of writing two articles for the October 2013 issue of THE JACKSON COUNTY CHRONICLES that will be mailed to Jackson County Historical Association members the first week in October.   One article is about Sequoyah and his one slight connection to Sauta in Jackson County.   The other essay is entitled "What do Cherokee Records Reveal About Sauta and Sauta's Earliest Inhabitants?"
      I am using Cherokee Indian Agent Return J. Meigs' 1809 Cherokee census and survey.   Some of you might be interested to know  his 1809 census/survey shows (among other statistics)  12, 195 Cherokees, 583 black slaves, 94 students, and 5 schools.   Those who have studied Cherokee history know that several thousand Cherokees emigrated voluntarily in 1818 and 1819 and 1828.    I have just typed a March 17, 1819,  letter signed by 4 Cherokee men who lived at Sauta who stated there were 38 families assembled here (Sauta) who came to this place for the purpose of migrating westward.   Their situation is truly alarming.   They are entirely destitute of provisions to subsist on and unless we have aid and comfort extended toward us by the Government we must perish.   The cause of our situation at present is we depended on getting us boats to descend the river this Spring and in consequence of there not being boats enough we are compelled to remain here until next winter destitute of all means of support.   In the 38 families there are 200 souls (big and little).   We are of the opinion that 2 bushels of corn to each head will be sufficient to subsist on until we can raise support for ourselves.   We are driven to this desperate situation by a failure of Government or its agents in not furnishing the boats and provisions to the stipulation of the late treaty.     Richard Riley (lived at Sauta0  has about 400 bushels which he will let us have by your order.   His price is one dollar per bushel.   That is as low as corn can be got for here.    Signed:   Turtle Fields (his mark); Archy Campbell (his mark); Aron Price (his mark); and The Mink (his mark)
      These men and/or their wives show up later on the rolls in Arkansas....so it appears they finally made it to Arkansas.
      Ann B. Chambless

    • gary_bsanders
      Ann, in your research, have you encountered an Indian family named Peek or Peak? My great grandaunt Phoebe Sanders married Henry Lee in 1839 in Marshall
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 21, 2013
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        Ann, in your research, have you encountered an Indian family named Peek or Peak? My great grandaunt Phoebe Sanders married Henry Lee in 1839 in Marshall County. He left her and her children and then she returned to Jackson County where, according to family tradition, she married an Indian named Peek (could be his first name, I guess). The marriage did not last long and he does not appear with her on any census records.

        I agree with you and Jerry that most traditions of Indian ancestry cannot be confirmed. The Sanders male DNA of the two main Sanders lines in Jackson County is definitely European, though there are two or three possibilities of Sanders men having married Indian women and, of course, the rather unusual case of my greataunt who married an Indian man.
        --Gary

        --- In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Ann <rabc123@...> wrote:
        >
        > kUDOS to Jerry Triplett for a well spoken assessment of Cherokee blood
        > in Jackson County! For a number of years, I have researched the
        > Cherokee Nation and its inhabitants, and everything I have found to date
        > supports every word in Jerry Triplett's last email. In fact, I have
        > spent a great deal of time the last 3 months researching Sauta and Crow
        > Town in Jackson County between 1785 and 1819.
      • blackcloud27030
        Gary   Yes there was a family named Peek of mixed Cherokee blood in Jackson County. There are some photos of them in the Photos section at the Group Home
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 21, 2013
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          Gary
           
          Yes there was a family named Peek of mixed Cherokee blood in Jackson County. There are some photos of them in the Photos section at the Group Home Website.
           
          Clay

          From: gary_bsanders <gbs0010@...>
          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 12:44 PM
          Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Re: CHEROKEE BLOOD
           
          Ann, in your research, have you encountered an Indian family named Peek or Peak? My great grandaunt Phoebe Sanders married Henry Lee in 1839 in Marshall County. He left her and her children and then she returned to Jackson County where, according to family tradition, she married an Indian named Peek (could be his first name, I guess). The marriage did not last long and he does not appear with her on any census records.

          I agree with you and Jerry that most traditions of Indian ancestry cannot be confirmed. The Sanders male DNA of the two main Sanders lines in Jackson County is definitely European, though there are two or three possibilities of Sanders men having married Indian women and, of course, the rather unusual case of my greataunt who married an Indian man.
          --Gary

          --- In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Ann <rabc123@...> wrote:
          >
          > kUDOS to Jerry Triplett for a well spoken assessment of Cherokee blood
          > in Jackson County! For a number of years, I have researched the
          > Cherokee Nation and its inhabitants, and everything I have found to date
          > supports every word in Jerry Triplett's last email. In fact, I have
          > spent a great deal of time the last 3 months researching Sauta and Crow
          > Town in Jackson County between 1785 and 1819.

        • Ann
          ... Ann Chambless
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 22, 2013
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            This website may be helpful to many of you:


            Ann Chambless
          • waccess@bellsouth.net
            Unfortunately, I have not been able to find documented NA data that goes back far enough for my Cherokee ancestors, especially for those ancestors that stayed
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 22, 2013
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              Unfortunately, I have not been able to find documented NA data that goes back far enough for my Cherokee ancestors, especially for those ancestors that stayed on the East Coast and blended into the white communities. If anyone has any leads for documented Cherokees the 1600-1700s, I'd love to see them.
              I received this link from a cousin, for those of you who can use more recent information. It takes a ton of time to download the files, so don't give up. By the way, there are a lot of Vann families in this information.

              https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=738e6468ef283e92&id=738E6468EF283E92%215828&authkey=!AMvnuZ0Lb7zgFjc=



              --- In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Ann wrote:
              >
              > This website may be helpful to many of you:
              >
              >
              > > http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/1835census/index.htm
              > >
              > >
              > Ann Chambless
              >


            • gary_bsanders
               Thanks, Clay. My tentative theory is that Phoebe Sanders Lee was married briefly, about 1861,  to one of the sons of James Russell Peek and Judy Henson. I
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 23, 2013
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                 Thanks, Clay. My tentative theory is that Phoebe Sanders Lee was married briefly, about 1861, to one of the sons of James Russell Peek and Judy Henson. I think the mysterious Mr. Peek she married almost certainly has to be related to that family.--Gary 

                Message 3 of 5 , Sat, 09:55 PM
                Gary
                 
                Yes there was a family named Peek of mixed Cherokee blood in Jackson County. There are some photos of them in the Photos section at the Group Home Website.
                 
                Clay
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