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Re: Effects of the Civil War on residents in Jackson County, Alabama

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  • Stephen
    Included is the link for Civil War veterans ran by the National Park Service.  You have to select whether you are researching the Confederate enlistment rolls
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 17, 2013
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      Included is the link for Civil War veterans ran by the National Park Service.  You have to select whether you are researching the Confederate enlistment rolls or the Union rolls, along with their name.  Other people have written me claiming to have reached a "dead end" on their genealogical research.  I've found that the reason for many "dead ends" in this area is Indian removal in 1836, and the attempt by many families to hide their color and be "white."  The Indian Removal Act only removed the Natives who insisted on living the "tribal" way of life.  If they submitted themselves to white law, they were allowed to stay.  I'm not saying the existence they lived was a peaceful one, but many stayed here, especially in the mountain coves and hollers.  From Little Coon to Pea Town, there are many stories of families who refused to go with their native brothers and sisters.  I'm really not going out on a limb when I say that probably 60-70% of people who qualified as "Indian" in 1836 did not go on the Trail of Tears, but stayed here and took up the white man's ways.  I would also suggest that the Civil War was an Indian rebellion, but that is another story.   As far as trying to escape your color and the time leading up to the Civil War, I have found that many civil war veterans, and veterans families tried to forget the real history of the Civil War in these counties just like the majority of us have been trying to be "white" for almost 150 years.  If you had family in this area in 1830, there is almost a 90% chance that your heritage is Native American, because the Indians didn't allow just "anyone" to move into this territory.  This was the land of the very militant Chickamauga Cherokee and Dragging Canoe (from Chattanooga to Muscle Shoals).  The Cherokee did allow people to move into this area who were of Indian ancestry.  The Delaware are just one of the tribes the Chickamauga Cherokee took in after the Revolutionary War.  We know that psychology teaches us that the human mind will create many falsehoods and errors when dealing with painful times.  It wasn't until late in the 1800's, that the popular version of romance and valor was beginning to be the framework defining the memory of the South during the War.  For almost 40 years after the war it was a very painful time, especially for areas of the South that had high Unionist sentiments, because those counties were marked with war coupled with partisan violence.  A double whammy.  Very little was written about this guerrilla warfare to two reasons.  First, the north didn't want it known that there was such a large body of unionist that they left hanging out on a limb for almost 3 years.  Second, the side of the Confederacy didn't want it to be known that there was so much dissent to secession in the "heart" of Dixie.   A journalist who had traveled with Napoleon in his wars claimed that from Knoxville to Chattanooga he had "never" seen the type devastation inflicted on a people as he witnessed there during the Civil War.  Another claimed he knew he was in East TN by the farms burned to the ground.  On average, Southern counties lost 1/2 of their total land values from 1860-1865.  On the contrary, most Northern counties "doubled" their land values during the war.  The Confederate Sequestration Act and the Union Confiscation Act loomed high on the horizon of the average citizen in Jackson County.  Being neutral was not an option, for you cannot be neutral on a fast moving train.  If it wasn't enough that you could have your farm destroyed by shelling from either of the two armies, your farm could be seized depending on your loyalties and the occupier, or you could be burned out by partisans from either groups.  To get a clear picture, imagine half the property in Jackson County being destroyed in 3-5 years.  The true story of Jackson County during the Civil War has yet to be told.  For too long we have allowed the memory of the Confederacy to be framed by battlefield valor instead of sound government and actual events.  "The first casualty of war is the truth."  Gone To Texas.  

      http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/search-soldiers.htm?submitted=1&SDkeyword=&SDOriginState_count=None+Selected&SDlName=simmons&SDRankIn_count=None+Selected&SDfName=zachariah&SDRankOut_count=None+Selected&SDsideName=C&SDfunction_count=None+Selected
      "No man is justified in doing evil on the ground of expedience." Theodore Roosevelt
    • Waynette Davis
      To Freethinkier: If you had family in this area in 1830, there is almost a 90% chance that your heritage is Native American, because the Indians didn t allow
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 18, 2013
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        To Freethinkier:

        If you had family in this area in 1830, there is almost a 90% chance that
        your heritage is Native American, because the Indians didn't allow just
        "anyone" to move into this territory

        That statement in your email that I have highlighted in turquoise here,
        refers to exactly what area? Does it include Jackson County, Alabama?

        Enjoyed your thoughts.

        Waynette



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • blackcloud27030
        Waynette   That part of Jackson County west of the TN River became a Alabama county in Dec 1819 and whites began flooding in. The western part of Jackson
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 18, 2013
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          Waynette
           
          That part of Jackson County west of the TN River became a Alabama county in Dec 1819 and whites began flooding in. The western part of Jackson County adjoining Madison County MS Territory was being settled by whites as early as 1809 even though it was part of the Cherokee Nation.
           
          Clay

          From: Waynette Davis <wmddavis@...>
          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 8:37 PM
          Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Jackson County, Alabama
           
          To Freethinkier:

          If you had family in this area in 1830, there is almost a 90% chance that
          your heritage is Native American, because the Indians didn't allow just
          "anyone" to move into this territory

          That statement in your email that I have highlighted in turquoise here,
          refers to exactly what area? Does it include Jackson County, Alabama?

          Enjoyed your thoughts.

          Waynette

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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