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Sharecroppers

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  • Jerry Triplett
    Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 6, 2013
      Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

      After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

      Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • blackcloud27030
      Jerry   Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 6, 2013
        Jerry
         
        Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.
         
        Clay
         
         


        ________________________________
        From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...>
        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
        Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

         

        Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

        After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

        Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jewel Casey
        Jerry, my parents and most of my relatives were sharecroppers living in the south. We lived in Jackson County, AL. The shacks that were furnished, with the
        Message 3 of 20 , Jun 6, 2013
          Jerry, my parents and most of my relatives were sharecroppers living in the south. We lived in Jackson County, AL. The shacks that were furnished, with the land we rented on hafers as it was called, was hardly fit to live in. Sharecroppers rented the land and house, mules & tools, furnished the seed, fertilized and all the labor and when the crops were harvested and sold, the landlord got half the profits. And yes, we were merely white slaves 95% of the time, white, landless and very poor. I know this sounds awful but the truth hurts, so be it.
          Jewel

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Jerry Triplett
          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 3:56 PM
          Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



          Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

          After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

          Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          No virus found in this message.
          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3184/6390 - Release Date: 06/06/13


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • JLH
          My mother s father owned a couple of farms in Langston and had share croppers rent the home and farm. It was however a secondary occupation with the families
          Message 4 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
            My mother's father owned a couple of farms in Langston and had share croppers rent the home and farm. It was however a secondary occupation with the families and the men for the most part had other jobs also and farmed in there off time and family members would help with the farming Grandpa Treece would except a small amount of the crops for him and my grandmothers own consumption as part of the rent. I can remember going to one of the farms during hog killing time when I was very young.



            From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of blackcloud27030@...
            Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 10:18 PM
            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers





            Jerry

            Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

            Clay




            ________________________________
            From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@... <mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com> >
            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
            Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



            Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

            After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

            Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Larry Williams
            Sharecropping was often done by landowners also. For instance: cotton farmers often used a method called, hoe and pick which was a sharecropping method where
            Message 5 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
              Sharecropping was often done by landowners also. For instance: cotton
              farmers often used a method called, "hoe and pick" which was a
              sharecropping method where the farmer would plow, plant, etc. the crop and
              the landowner would hoe the cotton and pick the cotton and the profit was
              split on an agreed rate.


              On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South
              > took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used
              > as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.
              >
              > After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were
              > sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've
              > never seen that term applied to them.
              >
              > Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half
              > of the 20th century?
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Larry G. Williams
              Co-Director, Agrimissions
              43 Crisp Lane
              Trenton, GA 30752
              (706) 657-7778 Home
              (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
              agrimissions.williams@...
              lgwilliams1947@...
              http://agrimissions.com
              http://themissionsociety.org


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • clyde broadway
              Thirds or fourths was another way the crops were split. The Sharecropper would harvest his part and leave the owners part in the field. It was then up to the
              Message 6 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
                Thirds or fourths was another way the crops were split. The Sharecropper would harvest his part and leave the owners part in the field. It was then up to the land owner to harvest his own part of the crop. It was easy to tell how much to leave, because it was done by rows. The 'cropper would gather, say, 2 rows and leave one, gather two more and leave another, and so on. Then the owner would come and gather the remaining rows.
                The part that was left for the owner was sometimes referred to as the rent.. Down by the river at the edge of the field were built corncribs that were called "rent cribs" where the owner put his part of the harvest. The steamboats would come and the rent corn would be loaded onto the steamboats and shipped to market. My father, Bernice Broadway had a (gas powered, I'm thinking) corn sheller mounted on the back of a truck which he would drive to the rent cribs along the river and shell the corn for the farmers so they could ship pure grain without the cobs. This was back in the 1920s or 30s.
                 
                About 11 or 12 years ago I saw such a corn sheller mounted on a truck at the Dutton Antique Tractor show.
                 
                Dr. David Campbell wrote an article about these rent cribs that appeared in the Jackson County Chronicles sometime back in the 80s or early 90s. He interviewed people who knew about these cribs first hand.
                 
                --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:


                From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 8:45 AM



                 



                Sharecropping was often done by landowners also. For instance: cotton
                farmers often used a method called, "hoe and pick" which was a
                sharecropping method where the farmer would plow, plant, etc. the crop and
                the landowner would hoe the cotton and pick the cotton and the profit was
                split on an agreed rate.

                On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...> wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South
                > took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used
                > as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.
                >
                > After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were
                > sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've
                > never seen that term applied to them.
                >
                > Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half
                > of the 20th century?
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >

                --
                Larry G. Williams
                Co-Director, Agrimissions
                43 Crisp Lane
                Trenton, GA 30752
                (706) 657-7778 Home
                (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                agrimissions.williams@...
                lgwilliams1947@...
                http://agrimissions.com
                http://themissionsociety.org

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Larry Williams
                Interesting. are you a descendant of Charles Hunter Broadway? ... -- Larry G. Williams Co-Director, Agrimissions 43 Crisp Lane Trenton, GA 30752 (706) 657-7778
                Message 7 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
                  Interesting. are you a descendant of Charles Hunter Broadway?


                  On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 4:09 PM, clyde broadway <clydeabroadway@...>wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  > Thirds or fourths was another way the crops were split. The Sharecropper
                  > would harvest his part and leave the owners part in the field. It was then
                  > up to the land owner to harvest his own part of the crop. It was easy to
                  > tell how much to leave, because it was done by rows. The 'cropper would
                  > gather, say, 2 rows and leave one, gather two more and leave another, and
                  > so on. Then the owner would come and gather the remaining rows.
                  > The part that was left for the owner was sometimes referred to as the
                  > rent.. Down by the river at the edge of the field were built corncribs that
                  > were called "rent cribs" where the owner put his part of the harvest. The
                  > steamboats would come and the rent corn would be loaded onto the steamboats
                  > and shipped to market. My father, Bernice Broadway had a (gas powered, I'm
                  > thinking) corn sheller mounted on the back of a truck which he would drive
                  > to the rent cribs along the river and shell the corn for the farmers so
                  > they could ship pure grain without the cobs. This was back in the 1920s or
                  > 30s.
                  >
                  > About 11 or 12 years ago I saw such a corn sheller mounted on a truck at
                  > the Dutton Antique Tractor show.
                  >
                  > Dr. David Campbell wrote an article about these rent cribs that appeared
                  > in the Jackson County Chronicles sometime back in the 80s or early 90s. He
                  > interviewed people who knew about these cribs first hand.
                  >
                  > --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                  > Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                  > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 8:45 AM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Sharecropping was often done by landowners also. For instance: cotton
                  > farmers often used a method called, "hoe and pick" which was a
                  > sharecropping method where the farmer would plow, plant, etc. the crop and
                  > the landowner would hoe the cotton and pick the cotton and the profit was
                  > split on an agreed rate.
                  >
                  > On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > **
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South
                  > > took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used
                  > > as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.
                  > >
                  > > After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them
                  > were
                  > > sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've
                  > > never seen that term applied to them.
                  > >
                  > > Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half
                  > > of the 20th century?
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Larry G. Williams
                  > Co-Director, Agrimissions
                  > 43 Crisp Lane
                  > Trenton, GA 30752
                  > (706) 657-7778 Home
                  > (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                  > agrimissions.williams@...
                  > lgwilliams1947@...
                  > http://agrimissions.com
                  > http://themissionsociety.org
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  --
                  Larry G. Williams
                  Co-Director, Agrimissions
                  43 Crisp Lane
                  Trenton, GA 30752
                  (706) 657-7778 Home
                  (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                  agrimissions.williams@...
                  lgwilliams1947@...
                  http://agrimissions.com
                  http://themissionsociety.org


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Jewel Casey
                  Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn t have enough money left over from
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
                    Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn't have enough money left over from their farming when they paid off their debts each fall when they harvested their crops. So each year the sharcropper just started all over again, hoping over and over that next year would be better and never was. In the fall of the year sometimes he would start looking for another farm with a better house and a better deal for his family and they would move again and would start all over with another merchantile store to begin another year and pay up in the fall. Sometimes the house was better, maybe needed a new roof and my daddy would put new shingles on, paper the walls and make it much warmer, put banisters around the prorch so the kids couldn't fall off the porch while playing. Daddy always left the house in better condition than what he rented it. But the sharecroppers are still around in some parts of the south, what really ran then out was the big machinery taking over doing their jobs. The big farmers becoming bigger and changing the way they farm and no longer needing farm hands to get the work done. Then the farm hands had to find work in the mills and go north to find jobs in the steel mills, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                    Jewel

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: blackcloud27030@...
                    To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 9:18 PM
                    Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



                    Jerry

                    Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

                    Clay




                    ________________________________
                    From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...>
                    To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
                    Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



                    Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

                    After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

                    Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                    No virus found in this message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3184/6390 - Release Date: 06/06/13


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Patricia Elleven
                    ... Au contraire, Jewel! This entire discussion is fascinating. Pat Elleven [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
                      On Jun 8, 2013, at 6:50 AM, Jewel Casey <jcasey@...> wrote:

                      > SNIP - Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                      > Jewel
                      >
                      >
                      Au contraire, Jewel! This entire discussion is fascinating.

                      Pat Elleven

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • CULBERSON, SUSAN
                      I don’t consider it a lecture at all….thanks so much for sharing your story! Susan From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
                        I don’t consider it a lecture at all….thanks so much for sharing your story!

                        Susan

                        From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jewel Casey
                        Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 4:51 PM
                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



                        Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn't have enough money left over from their farming when they paid off their debts each fall when they harvested their crops. So each year the sharcropper just started all over again, hoping over and over that next year would be better and never was. In the fall of the year sometimes he would start looking for another farm with a better house and a better deal for his family and they would move again and would start all over with another merchantile store to begin another year and pay up in the fall. Sometimes the house was better, maybe needed a new roof and my daddy would put new shingles on, paper the walls and make it much warmer, put banisters around the prorch so the kids couldn't fall off the porch while playing. Daddy always left the house in better condition than what he rented it. But the sharecroppers are still around in some parts of the south, what really ran then out was the big machinery taking over doing their jobs. The big farmers becoming bigger and changing the way they farm and no longer needing farm hands to get the work done. Then the farm hands had to find work in the mills and go north to find jobs in the steel mills, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                        Jewel

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: blackcloud27030@...<mailto:blackcloud27030%40yahoo.com>
                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 9:18 PM
                        Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                        Jerry

                        Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

                        Clay



                        ________________________________
                        From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...<mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com>>
                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
                        Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                        Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

                        After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

                        Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        No virus found in this message.
                        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com<http://www.avg.com>
                        Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3184/6390 - Release Date: 06/06/13

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Waynette Davis
                        Loved these sharecropper stories....a much fuller many faceted and 3 dimensional look at a whole eco system so to speak that for me was a word reduced to a
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
                          Loved these sharecropper stories....a much fuller many faceted and 3
                          dimensional look at a "whole eco system" so to speak that for me was

                          a word reduced to a 2 dimensional concept.

                          Waynette Davis



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • clyde broadway
                          His grandson. ... From: Larry Williams Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com Date:
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jun 7, 2013
                            His grandson.

                            --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:


                            From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 3:54 PM



                             



                            Interesting. are you a descendant of Charles Hunter Broadway?

                            On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 4:09 PM, clyde broadway <clydeabroadway@...>wrote:

                            > **
                            >
                            >
                            > Thirds or fourths was another way the crops were split. The Sharecropper
                            > would harvest his part and leave the owners part in the field. It was then
                            > up to the land owner to harvest his own part of the crop. It was easy to
                            > tell how much to leave, because it was done by rows. The 'cropper would
                            > gather, say, 2 rows and leave one, gather two more and leave another, and
                            > so on. Then the owner would come and gather the remaining rows.
                            > The part that was left for the owner was sometimes referred to as the
                            > rent.. Down by the river at the edge of the field were built corncribs that
                            > were called "rent cribs" where the owner put his part of the harvest. The
                            > steamboats would come and the rent corn would be loaded onto the steamboats
                            > and shipped to market. My father, Bernice Broadway had a (gas powered, I'm
                            > thinking) corn sheller mounted on the back of a truck which he would drive
                            > to the rent cribs along the river and shell the corn for the farmers so
                            > they could ship pure grain without the cobs. This was back in the 1920s or
                            > 30s.
                            >
                            > About 11 or 12 years ago I saw such a corn sheller mounted on a truck at
                            > the Dutton Antique Tractor show.
                            >
                            > Dr. David Campbell wrote an article about these rent cribs that appeared
                            > in the Jackson County Chronicles sometime back in the 80s or early 90s. He
                            > interviewed people who knew about these cribs first hand.
                            >
                            > --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                            > Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                            > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                            > Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 8:45 AM
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Sharecropping was often done by landowners also. For instance: cotton
                            > farmers often used a method called, "hoe and pick" which was a
                            > sharecropping method where the farmer would plow, plant, etc. the crop and
                            > the landowner would hoe the cotton and pick the cotton and the profit was
                            > split on an agreed rate.
                            >
                            > On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > **
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South
                            > > took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used
                            > > as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.
                            > >
                            > > After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them
                            > were
                            > > sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've
                            > > never seen that term applied to them.
                            > >
                            > > Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half
                            > > of the 20th century?
                            > >
                            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            > --
                            > Larry G. Williams
                            > Co-Director, Agrimissions
                            > 43 Crisp Lane
                            > Trenton, GA 30752
                            > (706) 657-7778 Home
                            > (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                            > agrimissions.williams@...
                            > lgwilliams1947@...
                            > http://agrimissions.com
                            > http://themissionsociety.org
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            >

                            --
                            Larry G. Williams
                            Co-Director, Agrimissions
                            43 Crisp Lane
                            Trenton, GA 30752
                            (706) 657-7778 Home
                            (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                            agrimissions.williams@...
                            lgwilliams1947@...
                            http://agrimissions.com
                            http://themissionsociety.org

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • T'Lene Tillotson
                            I thoroughly enjoy the stories of times gone by. Brings them back to life. Many thanks to all. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jun 8, 2013
                              I thoroughly enjoy the stories of times gone by. Brings them back to life.
                              Many thanks to all.

                              On Jun 8, 2013, at 2:29 AM, clyde broadway <clydeabroadway@...> wrote:

                              > His grandson.
                              >
                              > --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                              > Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                              > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                              > Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 3:54 PM
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Interesting. are you a descendant of Charles Hunter Broadway?
                              >
                              > On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 4:09 PM, clyde broadway <clydeabroadway@...>wrote:
                              >
                              > > **
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Thirds or fourths was another way the crops were split. The Sharecropper
                              > > would harvest his part and leave the owners part in the field. It was then
                              > > up to the land owner to harvest his own part of the crop. It was easy to
                              > > tell how much to leave, because it was done by rows. The 'cropper would
                              > > gather, say, 2 rows and leave one, gather two more and leave another, and
                              > > so on. Then the owner would come and gather the remaining rows.
                              > > The part that was left for the owner was sometimes referred to as the
                              > > rent.. Down by the river at the edge of the field were built corncribs that
                              > > were called "rent cribs" where the owner put his part of the harvest. The
                              > > steamboats would come and the rent corn would be loaded onto the steamboats
                              > > and shipped to market. My father, Bernice Broadway had a (gas powered, I'm
                              > > thinking) corn sheller mounted on the back of a truck which he would drive
                              > > to the rent cribs along the river and shell the corn for the farmers so
                              > > they could ship pure grain without the cobs. This was back in the 1920s or
                              > > 30s.
                              > >
                              > > About 11 or 12 years ago I saw such a corn sheller mounted on a truck at
                              > > the Dutton Antique Tractor show.
                              > >
                              > > Dr. David Campbell wrote an article about these rent cribs that appeared
                              > > in the Jackson County Chronicles sometime back in the 80s or early 90s. He
                              > > interviewed people who knew about these cribs first hand.
                              > >
                              > > --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                              > > Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                              > > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                              > > Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 8:45 AM
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Sharecropping was often done by landowners also. For instance: cotton
                              > > farmers often used a method called, "hoe and pick" which was a
                              > > sharecropping method where the farmer would plow, plant, etc. the crop and
                              > > the landowner would hoe the cotton and pick the cotton and the profit was
                              > > split on an agreed rate.
                              > >
                              > > On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > > **
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South
                              > > > took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used
                              > > > as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.
                              > > >
                              > > > After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them
                              > > were
                              > > > sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've
                              > > > never seen that term applied to them.
                              > > >
                              > > > Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half
                              > > > of the 20th century?
                              > > >
                              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              > > --
                              > > Larry G. Williams
                              > > Co-Director, Agrimissions
                              > > 43 Crisp Lane
                              > > Trenton, GA 30752
                              > > (706) 657-7778 Home
                              > > (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                              > > agrimissions.williams@...
                              > > lgwilliams1947@...
                              > > http://agrimissions.com
                              > > http://themissionsociety.org
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                              > --
                              > Larry G. Williams
                              > Co-Director, Agrimissions
                              > 43 Crisp Lane
                              > Trenton, GA 30752
                              > (706) 657-7778 Home
                              > (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                              > agrimissions.williams@...
                              > lgwilliams1947@...
                              > http://agrimissions.com
                              > http://themissionsociety.org
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Jewel Casey
                              ... From: Jewel Casey To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:17 PM Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers Thank you Susan.
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jun 8, 2013
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Jewel Casey
                                To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:17 PM
                                Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers


                                Thank you Susan. I have enjoyed doing genealogy since 1970 and have found so many people that have led much more enjoyable and exciting life's than I, but none more fulfilling. I appreciate every day of my upbringing in Paint Rock Valley, Jackson County, AL and the rough times we had because I know it made a much better person of me and my brothers. When I look back at those days I have to laugh because we didn't know we were poor, everyone else we knew had as little as we did and we didn't consider them to be poor.
                                Thanks
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: CULBERSON, SUSAN
                                To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 9:07 PM
                                Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



                                I don’t consider it a lecture at all….thanks so much for sharing your story!

                                Susan

                                From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jewel Casey
                                Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 4:51 PM
                                To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



                                Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn't have enough money left over from their farming when they paid off their debts each fall when they harvested their crops. So each year the sharcropper just started all over again, hoping over and over that next year would be better and never was. In the fall of the year sometimes he would start looking for another farm with a better house and a better deal for his family and they would move again and would start all over with another merchantile store to begin another year and pay up in the fall. Sometimes the house was better, maybe needed a new roof and my daddy would put new shingles on, paper the walls and make it much warmer, put banisters around the prorch so the kids couldn't fall off the porch while playing. Daddy always left the house in better condition than what he rented it. But the sharecroppers are still around in some parts of the south, what really ran then out was the big machinery taking over doing their jobs. The big farmers becoming bigger and changing the way they farm and no longer needing farm hands to get the work done. Then the farm hands had to find work in the mills and go north to find jobs in the steel mills, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                                Jewel

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: blackcloud27030@...<mailto:blackcloud27030%40yahoo.com>
                                To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 9:18 PM
                                Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                Jerry

                                Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

                                Clay



                                ________________________________
                                From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...<mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com>>
                                To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
                                Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

                                After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

                                Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com<http://www.avg.com>
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                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Jewel Casey
                                ... From: Jewel Casey To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:19 PM Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers Glad you like it
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jun 8, 2013
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Jewel Casey
                                  To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:19 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers


                                  Glad you like it but it's over
                                  Thanks
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Patricia Elleven
                                  To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 8:26 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers




                                  On Jun 8, 2013, at 6:50 AM, Jewel Casey <jcasey@...> wrote:

                                  > SNIP - Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                                  > Jewel
                                  >
                                  >
                                  Au contraire, Jewel! This entire discussion is fascinating.

                                  Pat Elleven

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                  No virus found in this message.
                                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                  Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3199/6391 - Release Date: 06/07/13


                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Jewel Casey
                                  my new address is jcasey@lighttube.net ... From: Jewel Casey To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:19 PM Subject: Re:
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jun 8, 2013
                                    my new address is jcasey@...
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Jewel Casey
                                    To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:19 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers


                                    Glad you like it but it's over
                                    Thanks
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Patricia Elleven
                                    To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 8:26 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers




                                    On Jun 8, 2013, at 6:50 AM, Jewel Casey <jcasey@...> wrote:

                                    > SNIP - Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                                    > Jewel
                                    >
                                    >
                                    Au contraire, Jewel! This entire discussion is fascinating.

                                    Pat Elleven

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                    No virus found in this message.
                                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                    Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3199/6391 - Release Date: 06/07/13


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Jewel Casey
                                    how do I change my address to jcasey@ligghttube.net ... From: T Lene Tillotson To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com Cc: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jun 8, 2013
                                      how do I change my address to jcasey@...
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: T'Lene Tillotson
                                      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                      Cc: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 11:47 AM
                                      Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers



                                      I thoroughly enjoy the stories of times gone by. Brings them back to life.
                                      Many thanks to all.

                                      On Jun 8, 2013, at 2:29 AM, clyde broadway <clydeabroadway@...> wrote:

                                      > His grandson.
                                      >
                                      > --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                                      > Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                                      > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 3:54 PM
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Interesting. are you a descendant of Charles Hunter Broadway?
                                      >
                                      > On Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 4:09 PM, clyde broadway <clydeabroadway@...>wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > **
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Thirds or fourths was another way the crops were split. The Sharecropper
                                      > > would harvest his part and leave the owners part in the field. It was then
                                      > > up to the land owner to harvest his own part of the crop. It was easy to
                                      > > tell how much to leave, because it was done by rows. The 'cropper would
                                      > > gather, say, 2 rows and leave one, gather two more and leave another, and
                                      > > so on. Then the owner would come and gather the remaining rows.
                                      > > The part that was left for the owner was sometimes referred to as the
                                      > > rent.. Down by the river at the edge of the field were built corncribs that
                                      > > were called "rent cribs" where the owner put his part of the harvest. The
                                      > > steamboats would come and the rent corn would be loaded onto the steamboats
                                      > > and shipped to market. My father, Bernice Broadway had a (gas powered, I'm
                                      > > thinking) corn sheller mounted on the back of a truck which he would drive
                                      > > to the rent cribs along the river and shell the corn for the farmers so
                                      > > they could ship pure grain without the cobs. This was back in the 1920s or
                                      > > 30s.
                                      > >
                                      > > About 11 or 12 years ago I saw such a corn sheller mounted on a truck at
                                      > > the Dutton Antique Tractor show.
                                      > >
                                      > > Dr. David Campbell wrote an article about these rent cribs that appeared
                                      > > in the Jackson County Chronicles sometime back in the 80s or early 90s. He
                                      > > interviewed people who knew about these cribs first hand.
                                      > >
                                      > > --- On Fri, 6/7/13, Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > From: Larry Williams <lgwilliams1947@...>
                                      > > Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers
                                      > > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                      > > Date: Friday, June 7, 2013, 8:45 AM
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Sharecropping was often done by landowners also. For instance: cotton
                                      > > farmers often used a method called, "hoe and pick" which was a
                                      > > sharecropping method where the farmer would plow, plant, etc. the crop and
                                      > > the landowner would hoe the cotton and pick the cotton and the profit was
                                      > > split on an agreed rate.
                                      > >
                                      > > On Thu, Jun 6, 2013 at 4:56 PM, Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > > **
                                      > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South
                                      > > > took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used
                                      > > > as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them
                                      > > were
                                      > > > sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've
                                      > > > never seen that term applied to them.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half
                                      > > > of the 20th century?
                                      > > >
                                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      > > --
                                      > > Larry G. Williams
                                      > > Co-Director, Agrimissions
                                      > > 43 Crisp Lane
                                      > > Trenton, GA 30752
                                      > > (706) 657-7778 Home
                                      > > (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                                      > > agrimissions.williams@...
                                      > > lgwilliams1947@...
                                      > > http://agrimissions.com
                                      > > http://themissionsociety.org
                                      > >
                                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      > >
                                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > Larry G. Williams
                                      > Co-Director, Agrimissions
                                      > 43 Crisp Lane
                                      > Trenton, GA 30752
                                      > (706) 657-7778 Home
                                      > (423) 240-2089 Cell/Business
                                      > agrimissions.williams@...
                                      > lgwilliams1947@...
                                      > http://agrimissions.com
                                      > http://themissionsociety.org
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >
                                      >

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                      No virus found in this message.
                                      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                      Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3199/6394 - Release Date: 06/08/13


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • diane.cagle
                                      About 1950, we went by to check on our old home place (Cagle Place). I was just a kid and remember the sharecropper living in there and farming the land. After
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Jun 11, 2013
                                        About 1950, we went by to check on our old home place (Cagle Place). I was just a kid and remember the sharecropper living in there and farming the land. After we left I ask my Dad why the kids did not have shoes. He said they had shoes but only wore them school. When they came home they took their shoes off so they would not ware them out.

                                        Bill Cagle


                                        -----Original Message-----
                                        From: Jewel Casey <jcasey@...>
                                        To: Jewel Casey <jcasey@...>; jacksongenealogy <jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Sent: Sun, Jun 9, 2013 8:48 am
                                        Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers







                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: Jewel Casey
                                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:17 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                        Thank you Susan. I have enjoyed doing genealogy since 1970 and have found so many people that have led much more enjoyable and exciting life's than I, but none more fulfilling. I appreciate every day of my upbringing in Paint Rock Valley, Jackson County, AL and the rough times we had because I know it made a much better person of me and my brothers. When I look back at those days I have to laugh because we didn't know we were poor, everyone else we knew had as little as we did and we didn't consider them to be poor.
                                        Thanks
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: CULBERSON, SUSAN
                                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 9:07 PM
                                        Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                        I don’t consider it a lecture at all….thanks so much for sharing your story!

                                        Susan

                                        From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jewel Casey
                                        Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 4:51 PM
                                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                        Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn't have enough money left over from their farming when they paid off their debts each fall when they harvested their crops. So each year the sharcropper just started all over again, hoping over and over that next year would be better and never was. In the fall of the year sometimes he would start looking for another farm with a better house and a better deal for his family and they would move again and would start all over with another merchantile store to begin another year and pay up in the fall. Sometimes the house was better, maybe needed a new roof and my daddy would put new shingles on, paper the walls and make it much warmer, put banisters around the prorch so the kids couldn't fall off the porch while playing. Daddy always left the house in better condition than what he rented it. But the sharecroppers are still around in some parts of the south, what really ran then out was the big machinery taking over doing their jobs. The big farmers becoming bigger and changing the way they farm and no longer needing farm hands to get the work done. Then the farm hands had to find work in the mills and go north to find jobs in the steel mills, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                                        Jewel

                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        From: blackcloud27030@...<mailto:blackcloud27030%40yahoo.com>;
                                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                        Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 9:18 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                        Jerry

                                        Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

                                        Clay

                                        ________________________________
                                        From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...<mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com>>;
                                        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                        Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
                                        Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                        Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

                                        After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

                                        Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                        No virus found in this message.
                                        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com<;http://www.avg.com>
                                        Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3184/6390 - Release Date: 06/06/13

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                        No virus found in this message.
                                        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                        Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3199/6391 - Release Date: 06/07/13

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Jewel Casey
                                        That is so true Bill because most of us sharecroppers didn t have enough money left over to buy two or three pair of shoes. We had to have shoes to wear to
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Jun 11, 2013
                                          That is so true Bill because most of us sharecroppers didn't have enough money left over to buy two or three pair of shoes. We had to have shoes to wear to school and shoes to wear to church, so therefore we didn't shoes to wear around the house to play in or to work in so we had to go barefoot.

                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: cagle8185@...
                                          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com ; jcasey@...
                                          Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 10:43 AM
                                          Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers




                                          About 1950, we went by to check on our old home place (Cagle Place). I was just a kid and remember the sharecropper living in there and farming the land. After we left I ask my Dad why the kids did not have shoes. He said they had shoes but only wore them school. When they came home they took their shoes off so they would not ware them out.

                                          Bill Cagle

                                          -----Original Message-----
                                          From: Jewel Casey <jcasey@...>
                                          To: Jewel Casey <jcasey@...>; jacksongenealogy <jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Sun, Jun 9, 2013 8:48 am
                                          Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: Jewel Casey
                                          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:17 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                          Thank you Susan. I have enjoyed doing genealogy since 1970 and have found so many people that have led much more enjoyable and exciting life's than I, but none more fulfilling. I appreciate every day of my upbringing in Paint Rock Valley, Jackson County, AL and the rough times we had because I know it made a much better person of me and my brothers. When I look back at those days I have to laugh because we didn't know we were poor, everyone else we knew had as little as we did and we didn't consider them to be poor.
                                          Thanks
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: CULBERSON, SUSAN
                                          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 9:07 PM
                                          Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                          I don’t consider it a lecture at all….thanks so much for sharing your story!

                                          Susan

                                          From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jewel Casey
                                          Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 4:51 PM
                                          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                          Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn't have enough money left over from their farming when they paid off their debts each fall when they harvested their crops. So each year the sharcropper just started all over again, hoping over and over that next year would be better and never was. In the fall of the year sometimes he would start looking for another farm with a better house and a better deal for his family and they would move again and would start all over with another merchantile store to begin another year and pay up in the fall. Sometimes the house was better, maybe needed a new roof and my daddy would put new shingles on, paper the walls and make it much warmer, put banisters around the prorch so the kids couldn't fall off the porch while playing. Daddy always left the house in better condition than what he rented it. But the sharecroppers are still around in some parts of the south, what really ran then out was the big machinery taking over doing their jobs. The big farmers becoming bigger and changing the way they farm and no longer needing farm hands to get the work done. Then the farm hands had to find work in the mills and go north to find jobs in the steel mills, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                                          Jewel

                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          From: blackcloud27030@...<mailto:blackcloud27030%40yahoo.com>;
                                          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                          Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 9:18 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                          Jerry

                                          Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

                                          Clay

                                          ________________________________
                                          From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...<mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com>>;
                                          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                          Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
                                          Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                          Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

                                          After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

                                          Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                                        • JLH
                                          I know this may be off subject a little but my dad worked for the railroad so for that time he made fair money. and we had shoes but we just mostly went
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Jun 12, 2013
                                            I know this may be off subject a little but my dad worked for the railroad so for that time he made fair money. and we had shoes but we just mostly went barefoot when playing. You did not wear shoes in the house at all. If you smoked you went to the back porch to do it. We did not have air conditioning either.



                                            From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jewel Casey
                                            Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 6:11 PM
                                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers





                                            That is so true Bill because most of us sharecroppers didn't have enough money left over to buy two or three pair of shoes. We had to have shoes to wear to school and shoes to wear to church, so therefore we didn't shoes to wear around the house to play in or to work in so we had to go barefoot.

                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: cagle8185@... <mailto:cagle8185%40aol.com>
                                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com> ; jcasey@... <mailto:jcasey%40lighttube.net>
                                            Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 10:43 AM
                                            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                            About 1950, we went by to check on our old home place (Cagle Place). I was just a kid and remember the sharecropper living in there and farming the land. After we left I ask my Dad why the kids did not have shoes. He said they had shoes but only wore them school. When they came home they took their shoes off so they would not ware them out.

                                            Bill Cagle

                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            From: Jewel Casey <jcasey@... <mailto:jcasey%40cafes.net> >
                                            To: Jewel Casey <jcasey@... <mailto:jcasey%40lighttube.net> >; jacksongenealogy <jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com> >
                                            Sent: Sun, Jun 9, 2013 8:48 am
                                            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: Jewel Casey
                                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
                                            Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:17 PM
                                            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                            Thank you Susan. I have enjoyed doing genealogy since 1970 and have found so many people that have led much more enjoyable and exciting life's than I, but none more fulfilling. I appreciate every day of my upbringing in Paint Rock Valley, Jackson County, AL and the rough times we had because I know it made a much better person of me and my brothers. When I look back at those days I have to laugh because we didn't know we were poor, everyone else we knew had as little as we did and we didn't consider them to be poor.
                                            Thanks
                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: CULBERSON, SUSAN
                                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
                                            Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 9:07 PM
                                            Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                            I don’t consider it a lecture at all….thanks so much for sharing your story!

                                            Susan

                                            From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Jewel Casey
                                            Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 4:51 PM
                                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>
                                            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                            Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn't have enough money left over from their farming when they paid off their debts each fall when they harvested their crops. So each year the sharcropper just started all over again, hoping over and over that next year would be better and never was. In the fall of the year sometimes he would start looking for another farm with a better house and a better deal for his family and they would move again and would start all over with another merchantile store to begin another year and pay up in the fall. Sometimes the house was better, maybe needed a new roof and my daddy would put new shingles on, paper the walls and make it much warmer, put banisters around the prorch so the kids couldn't fall off the porch while playing. Daddy always left the house in better condition than what he rented it. But the sharecroppers are still around in some parts of the south, what really ran then out was the big machinery taking over doing their jobs. The big farmers becoming bigger and changing the way they farm and no longer needing farm hands to get the work done. Then the farm hands had to find work in the mills and go north to find jobs in the steel mills, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
                                            Jewel

                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: blackcloud27030@... <mailto:blackcloud27030%40yahoo.com> <mailto:blackcloud27030%40yahoo.com>;
                                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                            Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 9:18 PM
                                            Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                            Jerry

                                            Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

                                            Clay

                                            ________________________________
                                            From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@... <mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com> <mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com>>;
                                            To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                            Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
                                            Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

                                            Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

                                            After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

                                            Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                            No virus found in this message.
                                            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com<;http://www.avg.com>
                                            Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3184/6390 - Release Date: 06/06/13

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                            No virus found in this message.
                                            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
                                            Version: 2013.0.3343 / Virus Database: 3199/6391 - Release Date: 06/07/13

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                            No virus found in this message.
                                            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
                                            Version: 2013.0.3345 / Virus Database: 3199/6401 - Release Date: 06/11/13

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