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Mention of Bellefonte on Another List

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  • Anne P. Johnson
    Hello, Jackson County! The mention of Bellefonte, below, caught my eye, and I thought you might all find it interesting. Anne Johnson ... [Non-text portions of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 5, 2012
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      Hello, Jackson County!

      The mention of Bellefonte, below, caught my eye, and I thought you
      might all find it interesting.

      Anne Johnson

      Begin forwarded message:

      > From: webmaster@...
      > Date: June 3, 2012 11:56:20 PM EDT
      > To: webmaster@...
      > Subject: [The Georgia in the Civil War Message Board:] Digest 13417
      >
      > The following new message has been posted on The Georgia in the
      > Civil War
      > Message Board at <http://history-sites.com/mb/cw/gacwmb/index.cgi>.
      >
      > ***************************************************************************
      >
      > #13417: Re: Georgia Agricultural Schedule (Barry Colbaugh)
      >
      > ***************************************************************************
      >
      > MESSAGE: (#13417) Re: Georgia Agricultural Schedule
      > <http://history-sites.com/mb/cw/gacwmb/index.cgi?rev=13417>
      > AUTHOR: Barry Colbaugh
      > DATE: Sunday, 3 June 2012, at 11:51 p.m.
      >
      > Reply To: (#13300) Re: Georgia Agricultural Schedule
      > Author: Alan Pitts
      > Date: Wednesday, 29 February 2012, at 2:29 p.m.
      >
      > I am not sure he used a specific map. He had traveled through North
      > Georgia
      > prior to the war in the 1840's in search of horses. The story is
      > inAtlanta and
      > Environs: A Chronicle of Its People and Events, 1820s-1870s.
      >
      > On January 21, 1844, a tall red headed lieutenant, First Lieutenant
      > in the
      > U.S. Army then at Charleston South, Carolina received orders to
      > report to
      > Marietta, Georgia. He traveled by rail via Augusta to Madison where
      > he took
      > the mail coach. Passing through Marthasville (Atlanta 1847), he
      > arrived in
      > Marietta on February 17th. The journey took three days, for he had
      > been
      > delayed in leaving Charleston on February 14th.
      >
      > Upon arrival the young Lieutenant reported to Colonel Churchill,
      > Inspector
      > General of the Army. He spent the next six weeks assisting in taking
      > of
      > depositions of Georgia and Alabama concerning certain losses by
      > volunteers in
      > Florida of horses and equipment by reason of failure of the United
      > States to
      > provide sufficient forage, and for which Congress had made an
      > appropriation.
      >
      > During his spare time, The Lieutenant repeatedly rode horseback to
      > Kennesaw
      > Mountain, from the summit of which he viewed the surrounding country
      > including
      > Allatoona Pass,eighteen miles to the north, He also found time to
      > ride also by
      > horseback to the Etowah River(Rubicon of Georgia), to Allatoona, and
      > to the
      > Indian mounds(Etowah) on the Tumlin plantation in Cass, now Bartow
      > County.
      >
      > Upon completion of their work in Marietta the party was ordered to
      > transfer
      > its operations to Bellefonte, Alabama. En route, again by horseback,
      > the young
      > Lieutenant familiarized himself with the country west of Marietta
      > and around
      > Rome. Two months later, the work of taking depositions finished. The
      > lieutenant returned to Augusta upon his horse passing through Rome,
      > Allatoona,
      > Marietta, Marthasville, and Madison thence to Charleston and Fort
      > Moultrie by
      > Rail.
      >
      > This assignment during the early months of 1844, gave the young
      > soldier, the
      > chance to study at close range, the slopes, curves and stretches of
      > the
      > terrain, a habit engendered by a single fondness for the earth. The
      > information, carefully preserved in his memory, was to stand him in
      > good
      > steed. He returned twenty years later, not alone, and no longer a
      > lieutenant.
      > His name was William T. Sherman.
      >
      > Footnote from Memoirs of General William Tecumseh Sherman, Written
      > by Himself.
      > (2 volumes. New York 1891) I 30-32
      > Llyod Lewis, Sherman, Fighting Prophet . (New York 1932)
      >



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    • Ann B. Chambless
      Yes, William Tecumseh Sherman was in Northwest Georgia and Northeast Alabama. In his memoirs, Sherman mentioned the time he spent in Bellefonte, Alabama, and
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 5, 2012
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        Yes, William Tecumseh Sherman was in Northwest Georgia and Northeast
        Alabama. In his memoirs, Sherman mentioned the time he spent in
        Bellefonte, Alabama, and even mentioned a fish-fry given in his honor in
        old Bellefonte. He stated that his travels from Marietta-Kennesaw area
        to Bellefonte in the mid-1840s was of great aid when he was directing
        troops later during the Civil War through these same areas and routes.
        Also, Daniel M. Martin of old Bellefonte wrote to General Sherman during
        the Civil War asking for protection and reminded Sherman of the time he
        had spent in Bellefonte. Congressman W.R.W. Cobb did the same when he
        wrote to General Sherman in 1864.
        Ann B. Chambless
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJjb204amo1BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE3MjQyNwRncnBzcElkAzE3MDUwNDA4MzcEc2VjA2Z0cgRzbGsDZ2ZwBHN0aW1lAzEzMzg5MTUxNjM->
        >
        > S
        >
        >



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