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Re: [jacksongenealogy] PINK DAVIS was not in Tennessee but in Jefferson County, AL, working as convict labor at TCI

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  • blackcloud27030@yahoo.com
    Thanks Ann   And from the number of transfer entries he worked for more than one mining company.   Did the court trial records always refer to him as Pink
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 25, 2012
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      Thanks Ann
       
      And from the number of transfer entries he worked for more than one mining company.
       
      Did the court trial records always refer to him as Pink Davis or A. P. Davis with no full name?
       
      Clay


      ________________________________
      From: Ann B. Chambless <rabc123@...>
      To: Jackson Co Genealogy <jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 12:45 PM
      Subject: [jacksongenealogy] PINK DAVIS was not in Tennessee but in Jefferson County, AL, working as convict labor at TCI



       

      After reading the info on the Court Docket, I discovered that Pink Davis
      was not in an asylum in Nashville. IF you look more closely you will
      see Tenn C I & RR. Pink was used (and abused) as convict labor by the
      Tennessee Coal, Iron, and Railway Company (TCI) founded in 1852. Its
      home office was in Birmingham, Alabama, and TCI eventually became a
      subsidiary of the U.S. Steel Corporation. The following is taken from
      Encyclopedia of Alabama:
      "TCI entered the Birmingham district with the transfer of ownership on
      December 28, 1886. In addition to the Tennessee holdings, TCI now owned
      76,000 acres of coal land, 460 coke ovens, two blast furnaces, and
      13,000 acres of land that included the Red Mountain iron ore seam. The
      company moved its headquarters to Birmingham in 1895. Local
      industrialists hoped to develop steel plants as a local market for the
      existing pig iron industry. That same year, TCI began producing basic
      pig iron for northern customers, who converted it to steel, and in 1898
      began constructing an open-hearth furnace for manufacturing steel at
      TCI's Ensley plant. The furnace began operation on Thanksgiving Day,
      1899, launching Birmingham as a true competitor in the national iron and
      steel industry."

      NOTE BY ABC: TCI had a contract with the State of Alabama to use
      convictS as mine labor until 1911. Therefore, Pink Davis was in
      Jefferson County working/digging in a mine shaft for TCI. NO WONDER he
      tried to escape. I have read numerous horror stories of how the
      convicts were treated when they were "farmed out" to various mining
      companies. The same thing happened here in Jackson County at the
      Belmont Mines on Cumberland Mountain. The annotation of SHAFT by his
      name simply referred to the type work he did and where he did such work.
      Ann B. Chambless

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