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page 2 of JACKSON COUNTY CHRONICLES, dated October 2009: involving passports to travel through, visit, or work in the Cherokee Nation

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  • Ann B. Chambless
    For those of you interested in the early settlement of the northeast corner of Alabama prior to Jackson County s formation in December 1819, I am sharing 3
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 29, 2010
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      For those of you interested in the early settlement of the northeast
      corner of Alabama prior to Jackson County's formation in December 1819,
      I am sharing 3 pages I wrote and published in the JACKSON COUNTY
      CHRONICLES dated October 2009. King's Cove, Doran's Cove, and Old
      Bolivar were contiguous communities in the northeastern corner of the
      original boundaries of Jackson County (prior to the land east of the
      Tennessee River being added to Jackson County after the Cherokees signed
      the Treaty of New Echota in December 1835.)

      EARLY SETTLERS OF KING'S COVE, DORAN'S COVE, AND OLD BOLIVAR:
      WHO WERE THEY? WHEN DID THEY ARRIVE AND FROM WHENCE?
      By Ann B. Chambless

      A great deal of the history of King's Cove, Doran's Cove, and Old
      Bolivar has been written based on traditional stories. History without
      documentation is little more than legends. Legends open the door for
      errors in dates, years, names, and generations. This is true for many
      landmarks, events, and people indigenous to King's Cove, Doran's Cove,
      and Old Bolivar. Therefore, a current study of the early settlers in
      these areas is long past due.

      Who were they? When did they arrive and from whence?

      Bureau of Indian Affairs records are a must-read for studying when and
      by whom King's Cove, Doran's Cove, and Old Bolivar were settled. White
      men who came into this area before late-1819 were intruders in the
      Cherokee Nation UNLESS they had obtained a passport, and several
      instances of their removal is documented by Bureau of Indian Affairs
      records.

      NOTE: The 1791 Treaty of Holston between the Cherokees and the Federal
      Government ceded land in Eastern Tennessee in exchange for President
      Washington's guarantee that the Cherokee Nation would never again be
      invaded by white settlers. This treaty forced Americans to obtain
      passports to enter Cherokee lands and granted the Cherokees the right to
      evict settlers.

      Passports to travel through, visit, or work in the Cherokee Nation were
      signed by Return J. Meigs, the Indian Agent to the Cherokees from
      1801-1823. The Agency was first located at Southwest Point near
      Kingston, TN. Then it moved to Hiwassee Garrison near Dayton, TN.
      Following a dispute over the title to the Garrison land, it was moved to
      Calhoun, Tennessee.
      Some white men who had special skills, such as blacksmiths, were invited
      onto the land by the tribe. In copying the following passes, I have
      omitted portions that were repeated on every pass. On those for passage
      through the Nation, the phrase "they conducting themselves in conformity
      to the Laws for regulating intercourse with the Indian Tribes & for
      preserving peace on the frontier" appears. In those passes granting
      permission to remain in the Cherokee Nation, the phrase "provided there
      shall be no objections made by the Indians" is used.
      Work passports specified the amount of time (usually limited to no more
      than four months) that a white man's "green card" allowed him to
      remain in the Cherokee Nation. For example:
      "James Ore Junior, William _Wark_, Robert _Hugens_, William _Willson_ &
      James _Woolsey _are permitted to pass into the Cherokee Nation to work
      at Salt _Petre_ Works . . they may remain in the nation four months. . .
      22 Nov 1803" page 2

      Researched and written by Ann B. Chambless in October 2009.


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