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Cherokees

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  • Nell Roberts
    Clay, where does the Melungeon come into the picture of Native American? or do they? I have really enjoyed your email describing the Cherokees and the
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 29, 2010
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      Clay, where does the Melungeon come into the picture of Native American? or do they?
      I have really enjoyed your email describing the Cherokees and the Cherokee nation, it does make the picture I have of them somewhat clearer. I think the only way we are really going to know is DNA.
      Thanks!!! and keep giving us the real history on the Native American.


      Some marriage licenses in Jackson County of persons of known Indian descent are marked as (c), an example is F.M.(Frances Marion) Boothe m. R. A. (Rebecca Alice) Keys 28 Dec 1884.. Rebecca Alice Keys was a granddaughter of Samuel Keys and Mary Polly Riley who was one of Doublehead's granddaughters. Rebecca Alice and her children were enrolled in the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma.

      This is not always the case. None of the Gullatts who were of Indian descent were marked (c) on their marriage license or the census. It is rare to find someone listed as Indian on the Jackson Co. Census of any year even those who were full blood, an example Jemima (Welsh) Clark wife of Isaac Clark, she was a full blood Cherokee, two of her daughters Jerusha Juliett and Martha Elizabeth married the Gullatt twins James M. and Thomas J. Niether she or of her children or grandchildren were ever listed as Indian. Some of her grandchildren applied for membership in the Cherokee Nation but were denied.

      I did a study of Jackson County's census several years ago and found less that a dozen who were listed as Indian or Native American. Isaac Clark on the 1840 Census is listed with on Free Colored Person a male age 10-23. I have never figured out who this is, one of Jemima's relatives I suppose. Jemima was always listed as a white female on all the census. From what I have been told it was whispered at family gatherings that the Gullatts and Clarks were Indian but no one talked about it openly. I don't descend from Jerusha Juliett Clark but from James M.'s second wife Malissa Payne Harper, but all the Gullatts from Jackson Co. have Indian blood from the early 1700s in VA through Manerva Catherine Yancy (Mitchell) Gullatt's grandmother Sebacah (Bridwell) Botts.

      It was in Virginia and Eastern North Carolina that Indians/Native Americans were most frequently listed as Black or Colored Persons on the Census. It was not really legal to be an Indian is the Southeastern US until the Civil Rights laws in the mid 1960s and it was not legal for Indians to marry whites until the Supreme Court's "Loving v. VA" decision in 1967.

      The state of Virginia had an active policy denying that there were any Indians left in the state. They had an idiot named Walter Plecker as Register of Virginia's Bureau of Vital Statistics from 1912 to 1946 who rigidly enforced the 1924 Racial Integrity Law, know as the "one drop law" which said there were "pure" white and everybody else. Virginia later changed the law to allow people with no more than one sixteenth Native American/Indian blood to still be considered white due to uproar of the descendants of John Rolfe and Pocahontas. Plecker changed birth certificates and marriages records of Native Americans to Negro, Colored or Mulatto. He was a leader in America's Eugenics, purging the records of anyone who he thought had "one drop" of blood from any other race other than Anglo-Saxon. Plecker boasted in 1943 "Hitler's genealogical study of the Jews is not more complete".

      It has only been during the last 30 years that the Governor of Virginia has apologized for what Plecker did and Virginia now allows changing of the records to show Indian/Native American on the records and at state expense.

      You can find a lot of info on the Cherokees and what lands they had as well as the other tribes of the Southeastern US at tngenweb, click on the First People of Tennessee and the American Southeast.

      Clay

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • RON aKINS
      Hi Nell,my grandmother Lu Huff was very dark complected.Her grandfather William Huff is said to have married a full blood Cherokee woman in Sevier County,TN in
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 29, 2010
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        Hi Nell,my grandmother Lu Huff was very dark complected.Her grandfather William Huff is said to have married a full blood Cherokee woman in Sevier County,TN in the early 1800's.Where could I look to verify this.Maybe I will have to just rely on the family oral history. Ron Akins

        --- On Wed, 9/29/10, Nell Roberts <faylen3@...> wrote:

        > From: Nell Roberts <faylen3@...>
        > Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Cherokees
        > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Wednesday, September 29, 2010, 10:32 AM
        >
        >   Clay, where does the Melungeon come into the picture
        > of Native American? or do they?
        >    I have really enjoyed your email
        > describing  the Cherokees and the Cherokee nation, it
        > does make the picture I have of them somewhat clearer.
        > I  think the only way we are really going to know is
        > DNA.
        >   Thanks!!! and keep giving us the  real history
        > on the  Native American.
        >
        >
        >   Some marriage licenses in Jackson County of persons
        > of known Indian descent are marked as (c), an example is
        > F.M.(Frances Marion) Boothe m. R. A. (Rebecca Alice) Keys 28
        > Dec 1884.. Rebecca Alice Keys was a granddaughter of Samuel
        > Keys and Mary Polly Riley who  was one of Doublehead's
        > granddaughters. Rebecca Alice and her children were enrolled
        > in the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma.
        >    
        >   This is not always the case.  None of the
        > Gullatts who were of Indian descent were marked (c) on their
        > marriage license or the census. It is rare to find someone
        > listed as Indian on the Jackson Co. Census of any year even
        > those who were full blood, an example Jemima (Welsh) Clark
        > wife of Isaac Clark, she was a full blood Cherokee, 
        > two of her daughters Jerusha Juliett and Martha Elizabeth
        > married the Gullatt twins James M. and Thomas J. Niether she
        > or of her children  or grandchildren were ever listed
        > as Indian. Some of her grandchildren applied for membership
        > in the Cherokee Nation but were denied.
        >    
        >   I did a study of Jackson County's census several
        > years ago and found less that a dozen who were listed as
        > Indian or Native American.  Isaac Clark on the 1840
        > Census is listed with on Free Colored Person a male age
        > 10-23. I have never figured out who this is, one of Jemima's
        > relatives I suppose. Jemima was always listed as a white
        > female on all the census. From what I have been told it was
        > whispered at family gatherings that the Gullatts and Clarks
        > were Indian but no one talked about it openly. I don't
        > descend from Jerusha Juliett Clark but from James M.'s
        > second wife Malissa Payne Harper, but all the Gullatts from
        > Jackson Co. have Indian blood from the early 1700s in VA
        > through Manerva Catherine Yancy (Mitchell) Gullatt's
        > grandmother Sebacah (Bridwell) Botts.
        >    
        >   It was in Virginia and Eastern North Carolina that
        > Indians/Native Americans were most frequently listed as
        > Black or Colored Persons on the Census. It was not really
        > legal to be an Indian is the Southeastern US until the Civil
        > Rights laws in the mid 1960s and it was not legal for
        > Indians to marry whites until the Supreme Court's "Loving v.
        > VA" decision in 1967.
        >    
        >   The state of Virginia had an active policy denying
        > that there were any Indians left in the state. They had an
        > idiot named Walter Plecker as Register of Virginia's 
        > Bureau of Vital Statistics from 1912 to 1946 who rigidly
        > enforced the 1924 Racial Integrity Law, know as the "one
        > drop law" which said there were "pure" white and everybody
        > else. Virginia later changed the law to allow people with no
        > more than one sixteenth Native American/Indian blood to
        > still be considered white due to uproar of the descendants
        > of John Rolfe and Pocahontas. Plecker changed birth
        > certificates and marriages records of Native Americans to
        > Negro, Colored or Mulatto.  He was a leader in
        > America's Eugenics, purging the records of anyone who he
        > thought had "one drop" of blood from any other race other
        > than Anglo-Saxon. Plecker boasted in 1943 "Hitler's
        > genealogical study of the Jews is not more complete".
        >    
        >   It has only been during the last 30 years that the
        > Governor of Virginia has apologized for what Plecker did and
        > Virginia now allows changing of the records to show
        > Indian/Native American on the records and at state expense.
        >    
        >   You can find a lot of info on the Cherokees and what
        > lands they had as well as the other tribes of the
        > Southeastern US at  tngenweb, click on the First People
        > of Tennessee and the American Southeast.
        >    
        >   Clay
        >
        >   [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
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        >
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        >
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