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RE: [jacksongenealogy] EARLY SUMMER HOMES in JACKSON COUNTY

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  • Regina Pipes
    I find this so interesting. If I have ever heard of these summer homes I don t remember BUT I think I have blocked so much of my childhood out of my memory.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 29, 2010
      I find this so interesting. If I have ever heard of these summer homes I
      don't remember BUT I think I have blocked so much of my childhood out of my
      memory. I don't remember work ever letting up when I was young. I don't
      have any memory of not being in some field working or going around trying to
      get yards to mow or going around picking up coke bottles to sale. I
      remember hoeing cotton, picking cotton, pulling corn or picking pepper,
      black berry picking or picking wild plumbs. We always had a large garden
      and there was always something to pick to be canned. The school I started
      to school in didn't have indoor bathrooms so we sure didn't have heating and
      cooling in the school. We burned coal in the winter and opened windows in
      the summer. Now days when someone says they were raised poor I wonder what
      they mean.



      Regina



      From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard Matthews
      Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2010 8:35 AM
      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] EARLY SUMMER HOMES in JACKSON COUNTY





      Farm work did let up some by early July, when many crops were "laid by"
      until the Fall harvest, but yes there was still plenty of work to be done
      such as a gardens to tend, farm animals to be cared for and such never
      ending chores. It could be that the old and feeble, women and small children
      went off to summer mountain homes, for it was somewhat cooler along the
      bluff areas of our surrounding hills, where a cooling breeze could be had at
      times.

      Part of my growing up years and pre-air conditioning years were spent on
      Sand Mountain, between Hodge and Section, Alabama and I must say it
      was unbearably hot there also. We would picnic on the Section bluff, near
      Fern Cliff, to enjoy some of the bit cooler breezes. Fern Cliff lodge sat
      right at the bluff edge between Section and Hodge.

      Could it have been that the poor folks had to suffer through summer heat
      where they were and the more wealthy did have summer homes where they could
      escape some of the worst heat?

      Other ways we had of escaping the heat were, swimming in the Tennessee River
      and nearby creeks and springs, trips to some nearby caves, hand fans, and my
      favorite, home made ice cream.
      ............................................................................
      ............................................................................
      ............................................................................
      .....................

      On Mon, Jun 28, 2010 at 9:05 PM, Jewel Casey <jcasey@...
      <mailto:jcasey%40cafes.net> > wrote:

      >
      >
      > Hi Everyone:
      >
      > Well here goes my two-cents worth.
      >
      > Yes, there was a lot of people missed on the census in Jackson County as
      > well as the other states, but after all we are all so lucky to have the
      > census at all. When the 1890 was destroyed by fire and water we really
      > missed a lot of information!!!
      >
      > In 1860, 1870 and 1880 which was just after the Civil War there wasn't
      many
      > dudes hanging around Jackson County that had enough money to run off to
      the
      > mountains in the "summer time" and bum around or hide from the census
      taker.
      > They had to stay in their corn, cotton and hay fields, etc. to harvest
      their
      > crops and worry about feeding their families, not frolicking about in the
      > mountains trying to stay cool or lie to the census takers wherever he
      might
      > be riding through.
      >
      > So all the daydreaming and old-timers tales are cute but take it from
      > someone who was born and raised near and in some of those mountains, it
      > didn't happen back then. "Gone to the mountain" meant for a visit to their
      > family in case someone came by to visit with them. Merely a country saying
      > to let you know they were gone for a short time only.
      >
      > Thanks for listening
      >
      > Jewel
      >
      >
      >

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