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Flashlight Helps Read Tombstone Inscriptions

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  • grandmother6@rocketmail.com
    I found this very interesting and thought I would pass it on. Flashlight Helps Read Tombstone Inscriptions Shining a torch [flashlight] obliquely across an
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 13, 2009
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      I found this very interesting and thought I would pass it on.
      Flashlight Helps Read Tombstone Inscriptions
      Shining a torch [flashlight] obliquely across an inscription in the dark, makes the inscription really stand out. However, being a lady totally averse to exploring graveyards and cemeteries in the night, this method was not to my liking. I then hit on the idea of taking a large travel blanket on my trips. By placing that over the tombstone and crawling beneath it, it was sufficient for me to use the oblique torch method to read faded inscriptions. It worked every time, but I leave to your imagination the time I finished one particularly difficult stone. I had spent quite some time on my knees and I stood up groaning with the blanket draped over my head, just as a drunk came staggering down the churchyard path in the dusk. He turned tail and ran and I doubt he ever touched a drop again.
    • Karl Plenge
      There was an obituary in our local paper today for a lady from Fort Payne. I realize this is not Jackson Co, but it s close enough that I thought it may
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 13, 2009
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        There was an obituary in our local paper today for a lady from Fort Payne. I realize this is not Jackson Co, but it's close enough that I thought it may possibly have relevance to someone, either now or in the future. There is also a photo of her at the following link, but of course, it will not be there but a certain number of months or days:

        http://www.legacy.com/LakeCityReporter/Obituaries.asp?Page=Lifestory&PersonId=132660773

        Mrs. Carolyn Shortnacy Cole, 73, passed away peacefully in her sleep on Tuesday, September 2, 2009 following a long illness. Mrs. Cole was born on March 23, 1936 in Fort Payne, Alabama. Mrs. Cole moved from Fort Payne, Alabama to Ocala, Florida in 1956 and then from Ocala to Lake City in 1964. Mrs. Cole was united in marriage in 1952 to Mr. Johnnie Elie Cole. Mrs. Cole was employed with Aero Corporation in Lake City, Florida for 19 years before retiring. Mrs. Cole enjoyed doing an assortment of crafts.

        Mrs. Cole is survived by her husband of 57 years Johnnie Elie Cole: four sons, Bobby Cole, Mickey Cole, David Cole and Buddy Cole; one daughter, Linda Geiger: twelve grandchildren and nine great grandchildren, all of Lake City, Florida.

        A private memorial service was held for Mrs. Cole. Mrs. Cole will be sadly missed by friends and family.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Regina Pipes
        I also saw this posted on the GenNewbie web site. I have doubt of it working but you never know. Regina From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 14, 2009
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          I also saw this posted on the GenNewbie web site. I have doubt of it
          working but you never know.

          Regina



          From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          grandmother6@...
          Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2009 10:46 PM
          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Flashlight Helps Read Tombstone Inscriptions





          I found this very interesting and thought I would pass it on.
          Flashlight Helps Read Tombstone Inscriptions
          Shining a torch [flashlight] obliquely across an inscription in the dark,
          makes the inscription really stand out. However, being a lady totally averse
          to exploring graveyards and cemeteries in the night, this method was not to
          my liking. I then hit on the idea of taking a large travel blanket on my
          trips. By placing that over the tombstone and crawling beneath it, it was
          sufficient for me to use the oblique torch method to read faded
          inscriptions. It worked every time, but I leave to your imagination the time
          I finished one particularly difficult stone. I had spent quite some time on
          my knees and I stood up groaning with the blanket draped over my head, just
          as a drunk came staggering down the churchyard path in the dusk. He turned
          tail and ran and I doubt he ever touched a drop again.





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John Green
          I have also used this lighting method to find small objects on multi-color carpet. I don t know how you came upon this method, but I observed it on TV shows
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 14, 2009
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            I have also used this lighting method to find small objects on
            multi-color carpet. I don't know how you came upon this method, but I
            observed it on TV shows like Crime Scene Investigators. It works well
            for any similar jobs.

            John McCollum Green
            On Sep 13, 2009, at 10:45 PM, grandmother6@... wrote:

            > I found this very interesting and thought I would pass it on.
            > Flashlight Helps Read Tombstone Inscriptions
            > Shining a torch [flashlight] obliquely across an inscription in the
            > dark, makes the inscription really stand out. However, being a lady
            > totally averse to exploring graveyards and cemeteries in the night,
            > this method was not to my liking. I then hit on the idea of taking a
            > large travel blanket on my trips. By placing that over the tombstone
            > and crawling beneath it, it was sufficient for me to use the oblique
            > torch method to read faded inscriptions. It worked every time, but I
            > leave to your imagination the time I finished one particularly
            > difficult stone. I had spent quite some time on my knees and I stood
            > up groaning with the blanket draped over my head, just as a drunk came
            > staggering down the churchyard path in the dusk. He turned tail and
            > ran and I doubt he ever touched a drop again.
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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