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Traveling Salemen/women

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  • Clay Gullatt
    As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these products, spices, herbs,
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 2, 2009
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      As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these products, spices, herbs, flavorings, oinments, salves and other household products. How about the Fuller Brush man?
       
      I well remember all three of these coming to our house in the 1930s/40s/50s and my mother and grandmother buying from them and I can remember the name of one of their salesladies.
       
      Most of these products can still be ordered online and some of our local stores here in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Northwest NC stock them. We are mostly a rural county that caters to tourists. Wal-mart even stocks some of them.
       
      Clay

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • cagle8185@aol.com
      Don t forget the vacuum cleaner, encyclopedia, insurance,?and bible salesmen...... ... From: Clay Gullatt To:
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 2, 2009
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        Don't forget the vacuum cleaner, encyclopedia, insurance,?and bible salesmen......


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Clay Gullatt <blackcloud27030@...>
        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, 2 Mar 2009 2:16 pm
        Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Traveling Salemen/women






        As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these products, spices, herbs, flavorings, oinments, salves and other household products. How about the Fuller Brush man?
        ?
        I well remember all three of these coming to our house in the 1930s/40s/50s and my mother and grandmother buying from them and?I can remember?the name of one?of their salesladies.
        ?
        Most of these products can still be ordered online and some of our local stores?here in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Northwest NC stock them.?We are mostly a rural county that caters to tourists. Wal-mart even?stocks some of them.
        ?
        Clay

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Louise Howard
        We had Jewel Tea, Raliegh and Watkins Salespersons. We lived in the rural area of Dade County, Georgia on a back road. We always looked forward to them coming.
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 2, 2009
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          We had Jewel Tea, Raliegh and Watkins Salespersons. We lived in the rural area of Dade County, Georgia on a back road. We always looked forward to them coming. My Mom bought flavoring, herbs, salves, etc. We lived in Jackson County, Alabama before moving to Wildwood but I was too young then to remember if we had door to door salespeople call on us while living there.
           
          We were a large family and had to make every dollar stretch. I remember clipping coupons from Bordens Evaporated Milk, Fleetwood Coffee, and Octagon Soap. We redeemed them for dishes and other household items we needed at a coupon store in Chattanooga, Tennessee. This was some time before Big Bonus and S & H Green stamps were given with a purchase.
           
          Louise Howard

          --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Clay Gullatt <blackcloud27030@...> wrote:

          From: Clay Gullatt <blackcloud27030@...>
          Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Traveling Salemen/women
          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 3:16 PM






          As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these products, spices, herbs, flavorings, oinments, salves and other household products. How about the Fuller Brush man?
           
          I well remember all three of these coming to our house in the 1930s/40s/50s and my mother and grandmother buying from them and I can remember the name of one of their salesladies.
           
          Most of these products can still be ordered online and some of our local stores here in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Northwest NC stock them. We are mostly a rural county that caters to tourists. Wal-mart even stocks some of them.
           
          Clay

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Joe Burt
          Also Jewel Tea and all the lovely dishes you got with your purchase. JaNelle
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 2, 2009
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            Also Jewel Tea and all the lovely dishes you got with your purchase.
            JaNelle





            Clay Gullatt wrote:
            >
            > As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the
            > Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these
            > products, spices, herbs, flavorings, oinments, salves and other
            > household products. How about the Fuller Brush man?
            >
            > I well remember all three of these coming to our house in the
            > 1930s/40s/50s and my mother and grandmother buying from them and I can
            > remember the name of one of their salesladies.
            >
            > Most of these products can still be ordered online and some of our
            > local stores here in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Northwest NC
            > stock them. We are mostly a rural county that caters to tourists.
            > Wal-mart even stocks some of them.
            >
            > Clay
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
          • Jewel Casey
            Yes, I remember all these things well. Mr. Phipps from Huntland came to Princeton and up Lick Fork Creek that s a road that runs up between Maxwell and Putman
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 2, 2009
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              Yes, I remember all these things well. Mr. Phipps from Huntland came to Princeton and up Lick Fork Creek that's a road that runs up between Maxwell and Putman Mountain where we lived once a week and we traded with him to buy the things needed. He bought chicken and eggs from people on his route or traded for the things they needed in return. Boy, it was so much fun waiting for Mr. Phipps and his peddling truck to arrive each week. He would laugh and kid and joke with all of us and in later years when we moved to Huntland he and his family became church friends with all my family. He had a little machine to do candling of the eggs to see if they were good and he would look at us and grin and say" I don't know about this one, how old is it?" and we would say oh we just took it out of the nest, and he would say, Ok, ok, it's good". We moved from there in Dec 1945 and there still wasn't any electricity.

              yes, Clay, good memories, just sitting back here reading everyone's good ole days.

              Jewel
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Clay Gullatt
              To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, March 02, 2009 2:16 PM
              Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Traveling Salemen/women


              As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these products, spices, herbs, flavorings, oinments, salves and other household products. How about the Fuller Brush man?

              I well remember all three of these coming to our house in the 1930s/40s/50s and my mother and grandmother buying from them and I can remember the name of one of their salesladies.

              Most of these products can still be ordered online and some of our local stores here in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Northwest NC stock them. We are mostly a rural county that caters to tourists. Wal-mart even stocks some of them.

              Clay

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • jackman_0645
              Clay You must not be to far from me I am in Maryville and sitting on my back porch I get to look at the smokies all day. I remember all of those. I also
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 3, 2009
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                Clay
                You must not be to far from me I am in Maryville and sitting on my
                back porch I get to look at the smokies all day. I remember all of
                those. I also remember the breadman as well that sold bread cakes
                pies and cookies. I also remember the milkman as well in Knoxville it
                was Mayfield Milk and ice cream.
                John Larry Hamilton

                In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Clay Gullatt
                <blackcloud27030@...> wrote:
                >
                > As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the
                Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these
                products, spices, herbs, flavorings, oinments, salves and other
                household products. How about the Fuller Brush man?
                >  
                > I well remember all three of these coming to our house in the
                1930s/40s/50s and my mother and grandmother buying from them and I
                can remember the name of one of their salesladies.
                >  
                > Most of these products can still be ordered online and some of our
                local stores here in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Northwest NC
                stock them. We are mostly a rural county that caters to tourists. Wal-
                mart even stocks some of them.
                >  
                > Clay
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • nettiebau1952
                I cannot resist joining this discussion. My grandfather was a traveling salesman for Southwestern Books and for Rawleigh product. He lived in Coosa County and
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 3, 2009
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                  I cannot resist joining this discussion.

                  My grandfather was a traveling salesman for Southwestern Books and for
                  Rawleigh product. He lived in Coosa County and decided that the hard
                  life of farming cotton was not for him. He taught school a couple of
                  years and decided he was not cut out to be a teacher either. So he
                  became a book salesman for the Southwestern Book Company, a company in
                  Nashville that published religious books.

                  He traveled around between 1906 and 1911 selling for this company. He
                  drove around in a horse and buggy most of them time (I have a
                  wonderful picture of him out selling in his horse and buggy) though he
                  took the train other times. I have a letter about his taking the train
                  into Gurley, for example. I have letters where he is writing
                  Southwestern about his horse going lame and losing a week tending to
                  her needs.

                  Southwestern books were wonderful religious tomes filled with lots of
                  hellfire and damnation. My grandmother had one called The Railway
                  Through the Word (which I have now...) that still makes its way into
                  my nightmares. And what's more, Southwestern is still in business,
                  though I believe they have broadened their scope. Last summer, we had
                  friends whose daughter was traveling around selling books for them.

                  http://www.southwestern.com/Default.aspx

                  In 1910, my grandfather married my grandmother. She traveled with him
                  for a while, or took the train to meet him in major places like
                  Columbus, GA. But she didn't like traveling. She took all her
                  inheritance from her uncle and bought a struggling cotton farm, and my
                  poor grandfather was forced to farm (badly, I think) for ten years
                  until he was hired as deputy sheriff and in the late 20s and then
                  elected sheriff in 1930. He lost the election in 1935 and returned to
                  the road selling Rawleigh products until his death in 1936. I still
                  remember a glass ampule containing vanilla beans and a stinky black
                  liniment that my grandmother put on sprains. The label said that it
                  was equally good for men or horses. A few years ago, I bought modern
                  Rawleigh spices in period containers, and still have them in my
                  cabinet. I thought of my grandfather when I sprinkled Rawleigh nutmeg
                  into my quiche last week.

                  But my grandfather loved the road. I have all the letters and
                  postcards he sent my grandmother 1905-1911 and they are full of
                  exuberant descriptions of Alabama towns and life on the road. His
                  territory covered all of Alabama, so traveling gave him access to a
                  larger world that his friends and siblings who spent their lives
                  farming never saw.

                  So I have a warm spot in my heart from traveling salesmen and for this
                  man I never met except through his letters.


                  Annette Bradford

                  > In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, Clay Gullatt
                  > <blackcloud27030@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > As long as we are going down memory lane. Does anyone remember the
                  > Watkins and Rawleigh sales people? Both men and women sold these
                  > products, spices, herbs, flavorings, oinments, salves and other
                  > household products. How about the Fuller Brush man?
                  > >  
                  > > I well remember all three of these coming to our house in the
                  > 1930s/40s/50s and my mother and grandmother buying from them and I
                  > can remember the name of one of their salesladies.
                  > >  
                  > > Most of these products can still be ordered online and some of our
                  > local stores here in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in Northwest NC
                  > stock them. We are mostly a rural county that caters to tourists. Wal-
                  > mart even stocks some of them.
                  > >  
                  > > Clay
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                • Karl Plenge
                  Another example of why I love this list! Thanks to all of you for sharing these wonderful firsthand accounts and memories. [Non-text portions of this message
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 3, 2009
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                    Another example of why I love this list!

                    Thanks to all of you for sharing these wonderful firsthand accounts and memories.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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