Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Old maps and such

Expand Messages
  • Richard Matthews
    The old maps tell us something about the pre-automobile years. The transportation in those days was most times as the crow flies. Their trails went from point
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 6, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      The old maps tell us something about the pre-automobile years. The
      transportation in those days was most times as the crow flies. Their trails
      went from point to point up over mountain ridges and down through the
      swamps. Horse travel and foot transportation had many advantages.

      After automobiles became available many of the old routes went back to
      nature and some of the old places, no longer auto accessible, died out or
      dwindled.

      I guess the same thing is still happening when the new highways bypass the
      old towns.

      As one researches genealogy, especially back in settlement days, it is wise
      to refer to maps of the time. Even state boundries jumped around quickly as
      our country was being settled. What was then Georgia might now be Alabama or
      North Carolina now Tennessee. This makes the search about as confusing as
      having a family name that can be spelled four different ways . . . . . . . .
      but that is part of the challenge, isn't it?

      I have found that I have Cherokee heritage on both sides of my tree and that
      area of genealogy research seems to have been somewhat neglected in our
      area, but I'm finding that many familes in Jackson County have Cherokee
      blood. My McCoys, Rowlands, Moons, Mannings, and Isbells have strong indian
      connections.

      I had occasion to go to Atlanta yesterday and on the way back got off the
      interstate at Calhoun to visit the New Echota Cherokee capital site for the
      first time. If you have Cherokee heritage you need to visit there. The
      museum has a small library with good genelogy information. They have records
      of Cherokee familes who were removed from Crow Town and Sauta in Jackson
      County around 1835. There is also a recreation of the town there (houses
      and cabins, not teepees or wigwams), that shows how civilized the Cherokee
      were when their land was stolen from them. . . . . . we are indeed on
      Cherokee land.


      Richard
    • Richard Matthews
      (They have records of Cherokee familes who were removed from Crow Town and Sauta in Jackson County around 1835.) As an added note, that applies to our recent
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 6, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        (They have records of Cherokee familes who were removed from Crow Town and
        Sauta in Jackson
        County around 1835.)

        As an added note, that applies to our recent discussion of local ferries,
        the list of Cherokees, who were removed to the west, showed their
        occupations also, along the Tennessee river in northern Alabama, nine
        Cherokees owned and operated ferries in the pre-1835 years and most of them
        had white names . . . makes you wonder if our Mr Sublett might have assumed
        the operation of a ferry that had belonged to one of them.

        Richard
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.