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16011Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

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  • diane.cagle
    Jun 11, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      About 1950, we went by to check on our old home place (Cagle Place). I was just a kid and remember the sharecropper living in there and farming the land. After we left I ask my Dad why the kids did not have shoes. He said they had shoes but only wore them school. When they came home they took their shoes off so they would not ware them out.

      Bill Cagle


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jewel Casey <jcasey@...>
      To: Jewel Casey <jcasey@...>; jacksongenealogy <jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sun, Jun 9, 2013 8:48 am
      Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers







      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Jewel Casey
      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, June 08, 2013 3:17 PM
      Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

      Thank you Susan. I have enjoyed doing genealogy since 1970 and have found so many people that have led much more enjoyable and exciting life's than I, but none more fulfilling. I appreciate every day of my upbringing in Paint Rock Valley, Jackson County, AL and the rough times we had because I know it made a much better person of me and my brothers. When I look back at those days I have to laugh because we didn't know we were poor, everyone else we knew had as little as we did and we didn't consider them to be poor.
      Thanks
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: CULBERSON, SUSAN
      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 9:07 PM
      Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

      I don’t consider it a lecture at all….thanks so much for sharing your story!

      Susan

      From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jewel Casey
      Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 4:51 PM
      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

      Jerry, the sharecroppers had to buy all the supplies, food, clothing, etc, beginning in January each year because they didn't have enough money left over from their farming when they paid off their debts each fall when they harvested their crops. So each year the sharcropper just started all over again, hoping over and over that next year would be better and never was. In the fall of the year sometimes he would start looking for another farm with a better house and a better deal for his family and they would move again and would start all over with another merchantile store to begin another year and pay up in the fall. Sometimes the house was better, maybe needed a new roof and my daddy would put new shingles on, paper the walls and make it much warmer, put banisters around the prorch so the kids couldn't fall off the porch while playing. Daddy always left the house in better condition than what he rented it. But the sharecroppers are still around in some parts of the south, what really ran then out was the big machinery taking over doing their jobs. The big farmers becoming bigger and changing the way they farm and no longer needing farm hands to get the work done. Then the farm hands had to find work in the mills and go north to find jobs in the steel mills, etc. Sorry, didn't mean to start a lecture.
      Jewel

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: blackcloud27030@...<mailto:blackcloud27030%40yahoo.com>;
      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
      Sent: Thursday, June 06, 2013 9:18 PM
      Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

      Jerry

      Most poor whites who lived in the rural South were sharecroppers and were exploited by the landowners since you were forced to buy everything at the company store on credit and you never made enough to pay off your debt and buy seed and your needs for the coming year. Only with the coming of the mills in the late 1920s and 1930s did most poor whites get out of sharecropping. WW2 more or less killed the system with whites. The same system was used in the company stores with the coal miners in KY and WVA.

      Clay

      ________________________________
      From: Jerry Triplett <jrytrplt@...<mailto:jrytrplt%40aol.com>>;
      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy%40yahoogroups.com>;
      Sent: Thursday, June 6, 2013 4:56 PM
      Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Sharecroppers

      Most often sharecropping is used as an example of how whites in the South took a advantage of free, poor Blacks following the Civil War. It is used as an example of the worst of the worst exploitation.

      After looking at my ancestors in Jackson County, I think many of them were sharecroppers. They were white, landless, and I'm pretty sure, poor. I've never seen that term applied to them.

      Anyone know how land rents were paid in Jackson County in the first half of the 20th century?

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