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Re: [j4x-owners-group] Adding Solar Panels & wind generator to J-42

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  • Jvanheek
    Installed silent wind generator this year on our j 46 in Caribbean . Still use engine appr 1 hour/day to keep batteries up. Suggest also adding solar to be
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 2, 2013
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      Installed silent wind generator this year on our j 46 in Caribbean . Still use engine appr 1 hour/day to keep batteries up. Suggest also adding solar to be fully independent. Hate my Noisy Honda so will sell it when back in USA in may.
      Jan van Heek
      J46 SweetBeam

      Sent from my iPhone
    • Joseph Reed
      If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 2, 2013
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        If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

        If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

        Joe Reed 
        Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
         
      • William Stellin
        No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all. Bill Sent from my iPad
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 2, 2013
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          No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all.
          Bill

          Sent from my iPad

          On Apr 2, 2013, at 9:09 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

           

          If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

          If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

          Joe Reed 
          Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
           

        • Anthony M Iacono
          Joe, you probably know of Jim Wilson, currently on a circumnavigation with a crew consisting of his wife and two small boys. You may be interested to see his
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 2, 2013
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            Joe, you probably know of Jim Wilson, currently on a circumnavigation with a crew consisting of his wife and two small boys. You may be interested to see his Boat modifications / prep. That and  more very cool stuff, including some details of his adventure, can be seen on 



            From: Joseph Reed <joseph.w.reed@...>
            Reply-To: <j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Tue, 02 Apr 2013 21:07:55 -0300
            To: <j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com>
            Cc: Don Hekler <cptndon@...>, DONNA J HEKLER <donnajoyce@...>, Barbara Wallace <Barbara.j.wallace@...>, Lee Blanchard <lblanchard1@...>, Ken Dickinson <OrangeAero@...>, Mike Kienlen <eugene.m.kienlen@...>
            Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Adding Solar Panels & wind generator to J-42

             

            If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

            If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

            Joe Reed 
            Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
             

          • Wayne Cassady
            I was wondering if I was the only one thinking that.
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 3, 2013
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              I was wondering if I was the only one thinking that.

              On 4/2/2013 9:15 PM, William Stellin wrote:
               
              No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all.
              Bill

              Sent from my iPad

              On Apr 2, 2013, at 9:09 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

               
              If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

              If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

              Joe Reed 
              Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
               

            • Thomas Keffer
              I would have to agree. Joe, think about why you bought a J/42 in the first place. Surely it was for the great sailing performance, especially in light air. All
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 3, 2013
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                I would have to agree.

                Joe, think about why you bought a J/42 in the first place. Surely it was for the great sailing performance, especially in light air. All of that it's going to disappear as you laden the boat down, particularly with high windage items like an arch or solar panels

                It's your boat, but for my own, I've made the conscious decision to accept a more Spartan on-board life in exchange for those moments when VELOCITY is hard on the breeze, doing 7+ knots to windward, sailing, when everyone else is motoring.

                The one concession I've made is a larger (160 amp Electromaax) alternator. It's gotten the engine runtime down to about 45 minutes a day.

                Sincerely,

                Tom Keffer

                On Apr 2, 2013 7:30 PM, "William Stellin" <wstellin@...> wrote:
                 

                No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all.
                Bill

                Sent from my iPad

                On Apr 2, 2013, at 9:09 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

                 

                If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

                If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

                Joe Reed 
                Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
                 

              • Wayne Cassady
                Well said. I started removing extra stuff during the delivery of our boat back to the States that the previous owner had installed.
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 3, 2013
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                  Well said. I started removing extra stuff during the delivery of our boat back to the States that the previous owner had installed.

                  On 4/3/2013 11:04 AM, Thomas Keffer wrote:
                   

                  I would have to agree.

                  Joe, think about why you bought a J/42 in the first place. Surely it was for the great sailing performance, especially in light air. All of that it's going to disappear as you laden the boat down, particularly with high windage items like an arch or solar panels

                  It's your boat, but for my own, I've made the conscious decision to accept a more Spartan on-board life in exchange for those moments when VELOCITY is hard on the breeze, doing 7+ knots to windward, sailing, when everyone else is motoring.

                  The one concession I've made is a larger (160 amp Electromaax) alternator. It's gotten the engine runtime down to about 45 minutes a day.

                  Sincerely,

                  Tom Keffer

                  On Apr 2, 2013 7:30 PM, "William Stellin" <wstellin@...> wrote:
                   
                  No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all.
                  Bill

                  Sent from my iPad

                  On Apr 2, 2013, at 9:09 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

                   
                  If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

                  If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

                  Joe Reed 
                  Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
                   

                • William Stellin
                  Despite what you see out on the water, I don t think carrying a dinghy on davits is a good idea. In a gale and high seas it presents way too much windage.
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 3, 2013
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                    Despite what you see out on the water, I don't think carrying a dinghy on davits is a good idea.
                    In a gale and high seas it presents way too much windage.  During passage making, we always deflate ours and carry it on deck lashed in front of the mast. Even if it were a hard bottom, we would stow it deflated and on the fore deck.  The outboard is also stowed below in the starboard aft locker.  No jerry cans are ever on deck either.
                    I installed the optional port hard fuel tank and built a floor over it and the jerry cans can sit on top of the floor, down nice and low and very secure.
                    Bill

                    Sent from my iPad

                    On Apr 3, 2013, at 11:22 AM, "Wayne Cassady" <wcassady@...> wrote:

                     

                    Well said. I started removing extra stuff during the delivery of our boat back to the States that the previous owner had installed.

                    On 4/3/2013 11:04 AM, Thomas Keffer wrote:
                     

                    I would have to agree.

                    Joe, think about why you bought a J/42 in the first place. Surely it was for the great sailing performance, especially in light air. All of that it's going to disappear as you laden the boat down, particularly with high windage items like an arch or solar panels

                    It's your boat, but for my own, I've made the conscious decision to accept a more Spartan on-board life in exchange for those moments when VELOCITY is hard on the breeze, doing 7+ knots to windward, sailing, when everyone else is motoring.

                    The one concession I've made is a larger (160 amp Electromaax) alternator. It's gotten the engine runtime down to about 45 minutes a day.

                    Sincerely,

                    Tom Keffer

                    On Apr 2, 2013 7:30 PM, "William Stellin" <wstellin@...> wrote:
                     
                    No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all.
                    Bill

                    Sent from my iPad

                    On Apr 2, 2013, at 9:09 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

                     
                    If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

                    If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

                    Joe Reed 
                    Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
                     

                  • Joseph Reed
                    I agree that the dinghy should always be stowed on deck during a passage. My current dinghy has a soft inflatable floor which deflates to assembly that is 36 ,
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 3, 2013
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                      I agree that the dinghy should always be stowed on deck during a passage. My current dinghy has a soft inflatable floor which deflates to assembly that is 36", L 24" W, & 16" H. It  is stored on the cabin top forward of the dodger. If I upgrade the dinghy to a RIB it has to fit forward of the mast deflated and lashed down. Also, davits interfere with the swim ladder 

                      My overall goal is to keep as much performance as possible and still be able to do a 3,000 nm passage safely. For the Caribbean 1500, I installed the optional 31 gal fuel on the port side and 2 jerry can fit aft of it. During this passage we ran the engine just over 2 hours per day for battery charging, refrigeration and SSB use. Over the last 5 months cruising the Virgin Island, the engine is run 2 hours per day and the Honda about 1 hour per day.  

                      The current batteries are around 10 years old and will be replaced when I get back to Annapolis. During this upgrade I will add a SOC monitor for both the 400ah house bank and 75ah start battery. Also, I will take Tom's advise about upgrading the alternator. 

                      I have already decide against a gantry.

                      Thank you for all your inputs. I will update everyone when the final configuration has been selected.

                      Joe
                      Sent from my iPad


                      On Apr 3, 2013, at 11:52 AM, William Stellin <wstellin@...> wrote:

                       

                      Despite what you see out on the water, I don't think carrying a dinghy on davits is a good idea.
                      In a gale and high seas it presents way too much windage.  During passage making, we always deflate ours and carry it on deck lashed in front of the mast. Even if it were a hard bottom, we would stow it deflated and on the fore deck.  The outboard is also stowed below in the starboard aft locker.  No jerry cans are ever on deck either.
                      I installed the optional port hard fuel tank and built a floor over it and the jerry cans can sit on top of the floor, down nice and low and very secure.
                      Bill

                      Sent from my iPad

                      On Apr 3, 2013, at 11:22 AM, "Wayne Cassady" <wcassady@...> wrote:

                       

                      Well said. I started removing extra stuff during the delivery of our boat back to the States that the previous owner had installed.

                      On 4/3/2013 11:04 AM, Thomas Keffer wrote:
                       

                      I would have to agree.

                      Joe, think about why you bought a J/42 in the first place. Surely it was for the great sailing performance, especially in light air. All of that it's going to disappear as you laden the boat down, particularly with high windage items like an arch or solar panels

                      It's your boat, but for my own, I've made the conscious decision to accept a more Spartan on-board life in exchange for those moments when VELOCITY is hard on the breeze, doing 7+ knots to windward, sailing, when everyone else is motoring.

                      The one concession I've made is a larger (160 amp Electromaax) alternator. It's gotten the engine runtime down to about 45 minutes a day.

                      Sincerely,

                      Tom Keffer

                      On Apr 2, 2013 7:30 PM, "William Stellin" <wstellin@...> wrote:
                       
                      No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all.
                      Bill

                      Sent from my iPad

                      On Apr 2, 2013, at 9:09 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

                       
                      If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

                      If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

                      Joe Reed 
                      Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
                       

                    • William Stellin
                      Joe If you pack your inflatable in a bag, consider stowing it ahead of the mast. It is more secure there as the hand rails are closer, you can use the mast to
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 3, 2013
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                        Joe
                        If you pack your inflatable in a bag, consider stowing it ahead of the mast.
                        It is more secure there as the hand rails are closer, you can use the mast to tie it to as well, it makes a very handy step to get to the main headboard when you attach the halyard, it also is a nice seat up forward when you are underway and finally it is easier to inflate there due to more room and easier to launch with no boom in the way.  Just a thought.
                        Bill

                        Sent from my iPad

                        On Apr 3, 2013, at 12:42 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

                         

                        I agree that the dinghy should always be stowed on deck during a passage. My current dinghy has a soft inflatable floor which deflates to assembly that is 36", L 24" W, & 16" H. It  is stored on the cabin top forward of the dodger. If I upgrade the dinghy to a RIB it has to fit forward of the mast deflated and lashed down. Also, davits interfere with the swim ladder 

                        My overall goal is to keep as much performance as possible and still be able to do a 3,000 nm passage safely. For the Caribbean 1500, I installed the optional 31 gal fuel on the port side and 2 jerry can fit aft of it. During this passage we ran the engine just over 2 hours per day for battery charging, refrigeration and SSB use. Over the last 5 months cruising the Virgin Island, the engine is run 2 hours per day and the Honda about 1 hour per day.  

                        The current batteries are around 10 years old and will be replaced when I get back to Annapolis. During this upgrade I will add a SOC monitor for both the 400ah house bank and 75ah start battery. Also, I will take Tom's advise about upgrading the alternator. 

                        I have already decide against a gantry.

                        Thank you for all your inputs. I will update everyone when the final configuration has been selected.

                        Joe
                        Sent from my iPad


                        On Apr 3, 2013, at 11:52 AM, William Stellin <wstellin@...> wrote:

                         

                        Despite what you see out on the water, I don't think carrying a dinghy on davits is a good idea.
                        In a gale and high seas it presents way too much windage.  During passage making, we always deflate ours and carry it on deck lashed in front of the mast. Even if it were a hard bottom, we would stow it deflated and on the fore deck.  The outboard is also stowed below in the starboard aft locker.  No jerry cans are ever on deck either.
                        I installed the optional port hard fuel tank and built a floor over it and the jerry cans can sit on top of the floor, down nice and low and very secure.
                        Bill

                        Sent from my iPad

                        On Apr 3, 2013, at 11:22 AM, "Wayne Cassady" <wcassady@...> wrote:

                         

                        Well said. I started removing extra stuff during the delivery of our boat back to the States that the previous owner had installed.

                        On 4/3/2013 11:04 AM, Thomas Keffer wrote:
                         

                        I would have to agree.

                        Joe, think about why you bought a J/42 in the first place. Surely it was for the great sailing performance, especially in light air. All of that it's going to disappear as you laden the boat down, particularly with high windage items like an arch or solar panels

                        It's your boat, but for my own, I've made the conscious decision to accept a more Spartan on-board life in exchange for those moments when VELOCITY is hard on the breeze, doing 7+ knots to windward, sailing, when everyone else is motoring.

                        The one concession I've made is a larger (160 amp Electromaax) alternator. It's gotten the engine runtime down to about 45 minutes a day.

                        Sincerely,

                        Tom Keffer

                        On Apr 2, 2013 7:30 PM, "William Stellin" <wstellin@...> wrote:
                         
                        No pun or disrespect, but I think your vessel name says it all.
                        Bill

                        Sent from my iPad

                        On Apr 2, 2013, at 9:09 PM, "Joseph Reed" <joseph.w.reed@...> wrote:

                         
                        If I plan on going around the world, I will be adding solar, wind, battery upgrade and monitor SOC at a minimum. This means adding a gantry to the stern to accommodate all this and plus support for a dinghy. I am also considering a wind vane as a back up for the auto pilot.

                        If  you have any recommendation please provide your recommendations. I am planning all the upgrades this summer.

                        Joe Reed 
                        Keep It Simple J-42 hull #12
                         

                      • Paul Lever
                        On my J/37 while cruising Central America I had stainless bars weld from the pushpit to the lifeline gate entry. Then mounted smaller solar panels on the rail
                        Message 11 of 15 , Apr 4, 2013
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                          On my J/37 while cruising Central America I had stainless bars weld from the pushpit to the lifeline gate entry. Then mounted smaller solar panels on the rail on Magma rail mounts that were tiltable.  This let me put them up during normal conditions and fold them down when they might be in the way. Total  of 350 watts solar using 4 panels. Figure on most days at least one panel would be shaded. Handled all onboard electric when the weather was good. Required using the Yamaha 1000 genset when it was cloudy.

                          Paul

                        • Frank Flannery
                          We ve been cruising the Caribbean for 8 years on our J/40, so we have some experience with this. First and foremost, before considering adding charging
                          Message 12 of 15 , Apr 4, 2013
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                            We've been cruising the Caribbean for 8 years on our J/40, so we have
                            some experience with this.

                            First and foremost, before considering adding charging solutions, you
                            need to reduce your usage. Refrigeration and computers tend to be the
                            biggest draws, based on our experience. Make sure your fridge top is
                            VERY well gasketed and your compressor is well ventilated. Better
                            yet, get a keel cooler for the fridge. Next, get a netbook, since
                            they draw significantly less power. Probably 1/4 the power of a
                            normal laptop. Finally, upgrade your lights to LED and CFL. Also, an
                            amp meter is a must.

                            For charging, we have 290 watts of solar, mostly mounted on the
                            bimini, This was about perfect in the sunny E Caribbean, but in the
                            west, it is not always enough. We have a honda 2000 that can put 100
                            amps an hour into the batteries via an old Hart Freedom 20. A high
                            output alternator is great, but if your engine has a turbo, it will
                            wreck it eventually. The Honda, while noisy, will put in as many or
                            more amps and not heat up the boat interior, making your fridge work
                            even harder.

                            Finally, as for loading down your J-boat, yes it sucks, but it is the
                            inevitability of cruising. Of course we all try to keep the weight
                            down but it isn't going to happen. We have raised our waterline twice
                            and are laden with too many toys. That being said, the boat still
                            sails great, especially in light air. The other day, we were beating
                            into 10-11 kts doing about 6.4. I think the bigger penalty is in
                            breeze upwind in seas, hobbyhorsing really kills the speed. Luckily,
                            we work hard to avoid this for lots of reasons. You will also notice a
                            hit in under 8 or 9 and well. J boats are great caribbean boats
                            because we can sail island to island while everyone else is motoring.
                            When the seas are 8-12 ft, nobody is thrilled to be out there, but in
                            10-12 kts and 3-4 ft seas, we're sailing and they're motoring.

                            One suggestion on weight is get a 9.5 Aluminum AB dinghy and 15 horse
                            enduro. The weight combination is very good, and the dinghy is big
                            enough for all cruising purposes. If you put a 10 inch pitch prop on
                            it and some water wings, it will even plane 4 adults. The 9.5 fits
                            perfectly on the foredeck of a j/40, so I assume it will also fit the
                            42. It was one of the best purchases we've made.

                            Also, do the math on the weight of some panels vs fuel weight planning
                            the run your engine two hrs a day times 10 day passage. I think the
                            panels will win.

                            Good luck, Frank


                            On 4/4/13, Paul Lever <svjeorgia@...> wrote:
                            > On my J/37 while cruising Central America I had stainless bars weld from
                            > the pushpit to the lifeline gate entry. Then mounted smaller solar panels
                            > on the rail on Magma rail mounts that were tiltable. This let me put them
                            > up during normal conditions and fold them down when they might be in the
                            > way. Total of 350 watts solar using 4 panels. Figure on most days at least
                            > one panel would be shaded. Handled all onboard electric when the weather
                            > was good. Required using the Yamaha 1000 genset when it was cloudy.
                            >
                            > Paul
                            >
                          • John Burnett
                            We usually run the genset 2 hours a day primarily for the Sea Frost DC drain. We are looking at adding a couple solar panels on the bimini to cut down on
                            Message 13 of 15 , Apr 13, 2013
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                              We usually run the genset 2 hours a day primarily for the Sea Frost DC drain. We are looking at adding a couple solar panels on the bimini to cut down on genset time and act as a backup power source when the alternators die. 

                              We boat sat a Beneteau in SXM this winter and were very impressed with how little engine charging time their DC reefer used. They had a solar panel which helped out.

                              We used to have a 150 amp alternator and switched down to 100 amp.
                              The larger did not ever put out anything like its rated output.

                              We will probably add a wind mill next trip down to the West Indies.

                              John Burnett
                              J46 Folie a Deux



                              From: Jvanheek <jvanheek49@...>
                              To: "j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com" <j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Tuesday, April 2, 2013 12:55 PM
                              Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Adding Solar Panels & wind generator to J-42

                               
                              Installed silent wind generator this year on our j 46 in Caribbean . Still use engine appr 1 hour/day to keep batteries up. Suggest also adding solar to be fully independent. Hate my Noisy Honda so will sell it when back in USA in may.
                              Jan van Heek
                              J46 SweetBeam

                              Sent from my iPhone


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