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RE: [j4x-owners-group] Tides Marine Track and Slide

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  • Conrad Deeter
    No, none that you said it is aluminum then mine is the Tides Marine Track but it also has the pin at the bottom. Thanks, Conrad _____ From:
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 7, 2012

      No, none that you said it is aluminum then mine is the Tides Marine Track but it also has the pin at the bottom.

       

      Thanks,

       

      Conrad

       


      From: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com [mailto: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of William Stellin
      Sent: Tuesday, February 07, 2012 3:09 PM
      To: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Tides Marine Track and Slide

       

       

      Antal systems are made of aluminum and the gate is a sliding device with a knurled knob that you back off to allow the gate to be opened.  Except for the weight of the sail stacked up over the gate, the cars are very easy to reattach to the track.  The slides have some kind of material bonded to their insides that makes them slide with little friction You can probably Google their catalog to see it.
      Bill
      Sent from my iPad


      On Feb 7, 2012, at 3:55 PM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

       

      Now that you both described as Antal I bet the one on my J42 is also because I have that pin at the bottom.  However when it is time to reef or shake-out a reef it may be pretty hard to pull the pin or put the slides back in.... I use a Cunningham and that is what I have used before but thought they may be a better option. 

       

      Conrad

       


      From: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com [mailto:j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Hotmail
      Sent: Tuesday, February 07, 2012 12:25 PM
      To: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Tides Marine Track and Slide

       

       

      One other suggestion would be to contact Tides and see if the have a lower profile slide. Our Antal are 40mm which makes for a very manageable stack height even when the sail is fully down. I am pretty sure we only have 12 slides plus the headboard slider which is the equivalent of about 3-4 more.  You may have more slides than is necessary. Talk to your sailmaker about reducing the overall stack height. 

      Bill


      Sent from my iPod


      On Feb 7, 2012, at 11:23 AM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

       

      Do any of you use the Tides Marine Track and Slide system for your mainsail track.  It is made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWP) or thermoplastic made by Tides Marine in Florida .  If you do how did you get the reefing point low enough to hook onto the reefing cringles since the slides for this setup cause the sail to stack higher.   I love the track system because it makes it so easy to hoist and drop the main but it is really difficult to get low enough for a second reef.

       

      Thanks,

       

      Conrad

      Another J

       

    • Robert Thuss
      I had the Tides Marine system on my C&C 110 and have the Antal system on my J/42 Jade. Both work well. And on both I WOULD NEVER pull the pin to drop cars out
      Message 2 of 21 , Feb 8, 2012
        I had the Tides Marine system on my C&C 110 and have the Antal system on my J/42 Jade. Both work well. And on both I WOULD NEVER pull the pin to drop cars out of the bottom to reef! With wind and rough seas you would probably lose the whole stack, and there goes your main downwind. Webbing ring is the classic method and soft shackle is the up-to-date solution that resists chafe even better. Robert

        On Feb 7, 2012, at 3:55 PM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

         

        Now that you both described as Antal I bet the one on my J42 is also because I have that pin at the bottom.  However when it is time to reef or shake-out a reef it may be pretty hard to pull the pin or put the slides back in.... I use a Cunningham and that is what I have used before but thought they may be a better option. 

         

        Conrad

         


        From: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com [mailto:j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Hotmail
        Sent: Tuesday, February 07, 2012 12:25 PM
        To: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Tides Marine Track and Slide

         

         

        One other suggestion would be to contact Tides and see if the have a lower profile slide. Our Antal are 40mm which makes for a very manageable stack height even when the sail is fully down. I am pretty sure we only have 12 slides plus the headboard slider which is the equivalent of about 3-4 more.  You may have more slides than is necessary. Talk to your sailmaker about reducing the overall stack height. 

        Bill


        Sent from my iPod


        On Feb 7, 2012, at 11:23 AM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

         

        Do any of you use the Tides Marine Track and Slide system for your mainsail track.  It is made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWP) or thermoplastic made by Tides Marine in Florida .  If you do how did you get the reefing point low enough to hook onto the reefing cringles since the slides for this setup cause the sail to stack higher.   I love the track system because it makes it so easy to hoist and drop the main but it is really difficult to get low enough for a second reef.

         

        Thanks,

         

        Conrad

        Another J

         

        The information contained in this communication is confidential, may be privileged and is intended for the exclusive use of the above named addressee(s). If you are not the intended recipient(s), you are expressly prohibited from copying, distributing, disseminating, or in any other way using any information contained within this communication. If you have received this communication in error please contact the sender by telephone or by response via mail.

        We have taken precautions to minimize the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this message. We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.

      • William Stellin
        The way we reef it would be pretty hard to lose the stack. When underway, we only reef from a fully hoisted main. The halyard is under control on a winch and
        Message 3 of 21 , Feb 8, 2012
          The way we reef it would be pretty hard to lose the stack.  When underway, we only reef from a fully hoisted main.  The halyard is under control on a winch and clutch and frankly there has never been a time when even with a second reef in, that there was not enough room under the tack for the loose slides.  If we needed more room, it is very easy to open the gate, drop out two or three slides, close the gate, and finish tensioning the halyard.
          The nice thing about the Antal slides is that we can easily reef off the wind, lessening the flogging of the sail which would occur when reefing up wind.
          Bill

          Sent from my iPad

          On Feb 8, 2012, at 8:24 AM, "Robert Thuss" <Robert.Thuss@...> wrote:

           

          I had the Tides Marine system on my C&C 110 and have the Antal system on my J/42 Jade. Both work well. And on both I WOULD NEVER pull the pin to drop cars out of the bottom to reef! With wind and rough seas you would probably lose the whole stack, and there goes your main downwind. Webbing ring is the classic method and soft shackle is the up-to-date solution that resists chafe even better. Robert

          On Feb 7, 2012, at 3:55 PM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

           

          Now that you both described as Antal I bet the one on my J42 is also because I have that pin at the bottom.  However when it is time to reef or shake-out a reef it may be pretty hard to pull the pin or put the slides back in.... I use a Cunningham and that is what I have used before but thought they may be a better option. 

           

          Conrad

           


          From: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com [mailto:j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Hotmail
          Sent: Tuesday, February 07, 2012 12:25 PM
          To: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Tides Marine Track and Slide

           

           

          One other suggestion would be to contact Tides and see if the have a lower profile slide. Our Antal are 40mm which makes for a very manageable stack height even when the sail is fully down. I am pretty sure we only have 12 slides plus the headboard slider which is the equivalent of about 3-4 more.  You may have more slides than is necessary. Talk to your sailmaker about reducing the overall stack height. 

          Bill


          Sent from my iPod


          On Feb 7, 2012, at 11:23 AM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

           

          Do any of you use the Tides Marine Track and Slide system for your mainsail track.  It is made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWP) or thermoplastic made by Tides Marine in Florida .  If you do how did you get the reefing point low enough to hook onto the reefing cringles since the slides for this setup cause the sail to stack higher.   I love the track system because it makes it so easy to hoist and drop the main but it is really difficult to get low enough for a second reef.

           

          Thanks,

           

          Conrad

          Another J

           

          The information contained in this communication is confidential, may be privileged and is intended for the exclusive use of the above named addressee(s). If you are not the intended recipient(s), you are expressly prohibited from copying, distributing, disseminating, or in any other way using any information contained within this communication. If you have received this communication in error please contact the sender by telephone or by response via mail.

          We have taken precautions to minimize the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this message. We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.

        • Conrad Deeter
          Thanks, all the information is useful.. Conrad _____ From: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com [mailto:j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William
          Message 4 of 21 , Feb 8, 2012

            Thanks, all the information is useful..

             

            Conrad

             


            From: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com [mailto: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of William Stellin
            Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2012 7:58 AM
            To: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Tides Marine Track and Slide

             

             

            The way we reef it would be pretty hard to lose the stack.  When underway, we only reef from a fully hoisted main.  The halyard is under control on a winch and clutch and frankly there has never been a time when even with a second reef in, that there was not enough room under the tack for the loose slides.  If we needed more room, it is very easy to open the gate, drop out two or three slides, close the gate, and finish tensioning the halyard.

            The nice thing about the Antal slides is that we can easily reef off the wind, lessening the flogging of the sail which would occur when reefing up wind.

            Bill

            Sent from my iPad


            On Feb 8, 2012, at 8:24 AM, "Robert Thuss" <Robert.Thuss@...> wrote:

             

            I had the Tides Marine system on my C&C 110 and have the Antal system on my J/42 Jade. Both work well. And on both I WOULD NEVER pull the pin to drop cars out of the bottom to reef! With wind and rough seas you would probably lose the whole stack, and there goes your main downwind. Webbing ring is the classic method and soft shackle is the up-to-date solution that resists chafe even better. Robert

            On Feb 7, 2012, at 3:55 PM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

             

            Now that you both described as Antal I bet the one on my J42 is also because I have that pin at the bottom.  However when it is time to reef or shake-out a reef it may be pretty hard to pull the pin or put the slides back in.... I use a Cunningham and that is what I have used before but thought they may be a better option. 

             

            Conrad

             


            From: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com [mailto:j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Hotmail
            Sent: Tuesday, February 07, 2012 12:25 PM
            To: j4x-owners-group@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [j4x-owners-group] Tides Marine Track and Slide

             

             

            One other suggestion would be to contact Tides and see if the have a lower profile slide. Our Antal are 40mm which makes for a very manageable stack height even when the sail is fully down. I am pretty sure we only have 12 slides plus the headboard slider which is the equivalent of about 3-4 more.  You may have more slides than is necessary. Talk to your sailmaker about reducing the overall stack height. 

            Bill


            Sent from my iPod


            On Feb 7, 2012, at 11:23 AM, "Conrad Deeter" <cdsail@...> wrote:

             

            Do any of you use the Tides Marine Track and Slide system for your mainsail track.  It is made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWP) or thermoplastic made by Tides Marine in Florida .  If you do how did you get the reefing point low enough to hook onto the reefing cringles since the slides for this setup cause the sail to stack higher.   I love the track system because it makes it so easy to hoist and drop the main but it is really difficult to get low enough for a second reef.

             

            Thanks,

             

            Conrad

            Another J

             

            The information contained in this communication is confidential, may be privileged and is intended for the exclusive use of the above named addressee(s). If you are not the intended recipient(s), you are expressly prohibited from copying, distributing, disseminating, or in any other way using any information contained within this communication. If you have received this communication in error please contact the sender by telephone or by response via mail.

            We have taken precautions to minimize the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this message. We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.

          • Anthony M Iacono
            I shared the goose neck bushing fix Bill suggested with my friend who works at Hall. He told me they have changed the way they attach booms to masts since mine
            Message 5 of 21 , Feb 18, 2013
              I shared the goose neck bushing fix Bill suggested with my friend who works at Hall. He told me they have changed the way they attach booms to masts since mine was manufactured in 1998.  They now weld two aluminum lugs directly to the mast and use stainless bushings for the pin holes. He said Bronze could be used as well… Just FYI… Tony Affinity 26

               

            • William Stellin
              Too bad it took them so long to figure out the mismatch between alum. and stainless steel What is odd though is the fact our mast was built in 1995/96 and has
              Message 6 of 21 , Feb 18, 2013
                Too bad it took them so long to figure out the mismatch between alum. and stainless steel
                What is odd though is the fact our mast was built in 1995/96 and has the tangs welded directly to the mast.  So are the tangs for the boom vang.  Nothing is bolted or screwed on to the mast.
                I would have used stainless steel bushing if I could have easily found them.  The local True Value has all kinds of bronze bushings and I think I bought all I needed for less than $10.
                Bill Stellin   #6 Jaywalker 

                Sent from my iPad

                On Feb 18, 2013, at 7:17 PM, "Anthony M Iacono" <tony@...> wrote:

                 

                I shared the goose neck bushing fix Bill suggested with my friend who works at Hall. He told me they have changed the way they attach booms to masts since mine was manufactured in 1998.  They now weld two aluminum lugs directly to the mast and use stainless bushings for the pin holes. He said Bronze could be used as well… Just FYI… Tony Affinity 26

                 

              • Thomas Keffer
                Bill, do you have a picture? I m not having any problems with my gooseneck, but I m curious how you put yours together. Sounds like a great solution. -tk ...
                Message 7 of 21 , Feb 18, 2013
                  Bill, do you have a picture? I'm not having any problems with my gooseneck, but I'm curious how you put yours together. Sounds like a great solution.

                  -tk

                  On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 4:33 PM, William Stellin <wstellin@...> wrote:
                   

                  Too bad it took them so long to figure out the mismatch between alum. and stainless steel
                  What is odd though is the fact our mast was built in 1995/96 and has the tangs welded directly to the mast.  So are the tangs for the boom vang.  Nothing is bolted or screwed on to the mast.
                  I would have used stainless steel bushing if I could have easily found them.  The local True Value has all kinds of bronze bushings and I think I bought all I needed for less than $10.
                  Bill Stellin   #6 Jaywalker 

                  Sent from my iPad

                  On Feb 18, 2013, at 7:17 PM, "Anthony M Iacono" <tony@...> wrote:

                   

                  I shared the goose neck bushing fix Bill suggested with my friend who works at Hall. He told me they have changed the way they attach booms to masts since mine was manufactured in 1998.  They now weld two aluminum lugs directly to the mast and use stainless bushings for the pin holes. He said Bronze could be used as well… Just FYI… Tony Affinity 26

                   




                  --
                  Tom Keffer
                  keffer@...
                  +1 541-386-8891 (h)
                  +1 541-490-9507 (c)
                  Skype: tkeffer
                • William Stellin
                  I don t have any pic s. The boat is covered and miles away so not much chance till spring. However, to get a good idea, go to any large hardware store and
                  Message 8 of 21 , Feb 18, 2013
                    I don't have any pic's.  The boat is covered and miles away so not much chance till spring.
                    However, to get a good idea, go to any large hardware store and look for bushings.  Stock sizes have a half inch inside diameter which is the same as the pin outside dia.

                    Look for bushings with a collar on one end.  This collar will keep it from falling through the hole.
                    Next look for a drill bit that matches the outside dia. of the bushing.  You might have to hunt a little for the bit at a speciality machine tool store.  Try to get one almost the same dia as the bushing but just a hair smaller so you can press the bushing in.  Then with a long heavy bolt with washers on each end and a nut, put it through the bushing and the hole and tighten till you have pressed the bushing into the hole.  I think you get the idea.  
                    You will have to do the same for the boom tangs.  

                    With the gooseneck itself, I would take it to a machine shop and let them press in a bushing since it might be hard to find one long enough in a hardware store.   Also there is no room for a collar so the bushing must be flush with the ends of the holes which requires a tight pressed in fit.  Maybe Hall would do it for you if you sent the gooseneck back to them.
                    Hope this helps.

                    Bill

                    Sent from my iPad

                    On Feb 18, 2013, at 7:37 PM, "Thomas Keffer" <tkeffer@...> wrote:

                     

                    Bill, do you have a picture? I'm not having any problems with my gooseneck, but I'm curious how you put yours together. Sounds like a great solution.


                    -tk

                    On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 4:33 PM, William Stellin <wstellin@...> wrote:
                     

                    Too bad it took them so long to figure out the mismatch between alum. and stainless steel
                    What is odd though is the fact our mast was built in 1995/96 and has the tangs welded directly to the mast.  So are the tangs for the boom vang.  Nothing is bolted or screwed on to the mast.
                    I would have used stainless steel bushing if I could have easily found them.  The local True Value has all kinds of bronze bushings and I think I bought all I needed for less than $10.
                    Bill Stellin   #6 Jaywalker 

                    Sent from my iPad

                    On Feb 18, 2013, at 7:17 PM, "Anthony M Iacono" <tony@...> wrote:

                     

                    I shared the goose neck bushing fix Bill suggested with my friend who works at Hall. He told me they have changed the way they attach booms to masts since mine was manufactured in 1998.  They now weld two aluminum lugs directly to the mast and use stainless bushings for the pin holes. He said Bronze could be used as well… Just FYI… Tony Affinity 26

                     




                    --
                    Tom Keffer
                    keffer@...
                    +1 541-386-8891 (h)
                    +1 541-490-9507 (c)
                    Skype: tkeffer

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