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[j-ball] Re: Who is your favorite player?

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  • Takekuma Shingo
    My favorite player is Tomohito Itoh of the Yakult Swallows. He won the rookie of the Year the year the Swallows won the first Nippon Series in 15 years. Smae
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 10, 2000
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      My favorite player is Tomohito Itoh of the Yakult Swallows. He won the
      rookie of the Year the year the Swallows won the first Nippon Series in 15
      years. Smae year,I became a resident alien of theU.S.
      I like Sasaki,too

      >From: Michael Westbay <westbay@...>
      >Reply-To: j-ball@egroups.com
      >To: Pro Yakyu ML <j-ball@egroups.com>
      >Subject: [j-ball] Who is your favorite player?
      >Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 12:44:58 +0900
      >
      >Hi, all.
      >
      >Here's question #1: Who is your favorite player?
      >
      >That's a tough one. There was nobody I liked watching more than
      >Kazuhiro Sasaki. He would take a deep breath, heaving his chest upward,
      >before every pitch. That just shown of self confidence. One would hope
      >that the BayStars were up by less than 4 runs going to the ninth every
      >game, as that the the criteria for Sasaki to take the mound! But, alas,
      >Sasaki has now graduated from Pro Yakyu and moved on to Seattle.
      >
      >On the BayStars, there are a lot of great players. Takuro Ishii,
      >Takanori Suzuki, and Robert Rose are all top class. But I think that my
      >favorite BayStar is center fielder Toshio Haru. He first got my
      >attention when he would come on strong in the spring, then kind of
      >disappear as the season progressed. "Haru ichiban" (a term meaning
      >"first strong winds from the South of Spring") was a common play on
      >words for him in the press. (It seems to me that that was also the
      >slogan for a beer commercial a number of years ago, too, when it was
      >first applied to Haru. The reason it's a play on words, though, is that
      >"Haru" is synonymous with "Spring," although the characters for Haru's
      >name are different, literally meaning "Wave Breaker.")
      >
      >Nonetheless, it was his all out guts play on defense on every ball hit
      >to the outfield that made him a wonder to watch. On top of that, when
      >at bat, he'd hustle up the line on even the surest infield ground out,
      >trying desperately for an infield hit. Like Pete Rose in the '70s, you
      >can see that he wants that next bag.
      >
      >Sometimes it seems that Haru has more guts than brains, but still, the
      >impression of Haru that always comes to mind is his smiling, rug-burned
      >face after making a great diving catch in Tokyo Dome's center field. It
      >was plays like that in 1998 that sent the 'Stars all the way to the
      >Japanese championship pennant.
      >
      >The BayStars' number one draft pick this year, Kazunori Tanaka, looks to
      >be a similar player to Haru - but faster! He's defiantly one I've got
      >my eye on.
      >
      >Then there's ace pitcher Kuroki for the Chiba Lotte Marines. He first
      >really got my attention during, of all things, a losing streak. The
      >longest team losing streak in Pro Yakyu history, in fact. Nonetheless,
      >Kuroki came in in relief with a lead against Kintetsu. It was looking
      >like Lotte was going to finally break their losing streak. But, as fate
      >would have it, Kuroki gave up a home run (2-run or 3-run? I don't
      >remember) to blow the lead. He then knelt down on the mound sobbing.
      >Concentrating all of his physical energy on getting those last three
      >outs, and failing to do so, all of his emotional energy just burst. I
      >know. You wouldn't expect a professional to do that sort of thing. But
      >it shows that ball players are human, too.
      >
      >Kuroki continued to hold the attention of fans last season, starting out
      >by beating super-rookie Matsuzaka in front of the only sell out crowd at
      >Chiba Marine Stadium that I'd ever heard of. In his hero interview
      >after the game, Kuroki appealed to the fans to all come out and support
      >the team tomorrow. The next night hardly saw a few thousand fans. Oh,
      >well. He tried. And it's Kuroki's "nice guy" image that really makes
      >him likable.
      >
      >--
      >Michael Westbay
      >Work: Beacon-IT http://www.beacon-it.co.jp
      >Home: http://www.seaple.icc.ne.jp/~westbay
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      >

      ______________________________________________________
    • Jeffrey Sams
      Itoh has also shown interest in going to the Majors. He rehabbed with the Indians. ... From: Takekuma Shingo To: Sent:
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 10, 2000
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        Itoh has also shown interest in going to the Majors. He rehabbed with the
        Indians.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Takekuma Shingo <ys53@...>
        To: <j-ball@egroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2000 10:26 AM
        Subject: [j-ball] Re: Who is your favorite player?


        > My favorite player is Tomohito Itoh of the Yakult Swallows. He won the
        > rookie of the Year the year the Swallows won the first Nippon Series in 15
        > years. Smae year,I became a resident alien of theU.S.
        > I like Sasaki,too
        >
        > >From: Michael Westbay <westbay@...>
        > >Reply-To: j-ball@egroups.com
        > >To: Pro Yakyu ML <j-ball@egroups.com>
        > >Subject: [j-ball] Who is your favorite player?
        > >Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 12:44:58 +0900
        > >
        > >Hi, all.
        > >
        > >Here's question #1: Who is your favorite player?
        > >
        > >That's a tough one. There was nobody I liked watching more than
        > >Kazuhiro Sasaki. He would take a deep breath, heaving his chest upward,
        > >before every pitch. That just shown of self confidence. One would hope
        > >that the BayStars were up by less than 4 runs going to the ninth every
        > >game, as that the the criteria for Sasaki to take the mound! But, alas,
        > >Sasaki has now graduated from Pro Yakyu and moved on to Seattle.
        > >
        > >On the BayStars, there are a lot of great players. Takuro Ishii,
        > >Takanori Suzuki, and Robert Rose are all top class. But I think that my
        > >favorite BayStar is center fielder Toshio Haru. He first got my
        > >attention when he would come on strong in the spring, then kind of
        > >disappear as the season progressed. "Haru ichiban" (a term meaning
        > >"first strong winds from the South of Spring") was a common play on
        > >words for him in the press. (It seems to me that that was also the
        > >slogan for a beer commercial a number of years ago, too, when it was
        > >first applied to Haru. The reason it's a play on words, though, is that
        > >"Haru" is synonymous with "Spring," although the characters for Haru's
        > >name are different, literally meaning "Wave Breaker.")
        > >
        > >Nonetheless, it was his all out guts play on defense on every ball hit
        > >to the outfield that made him a wonder to watch. On top of that, when
        > >at bat, he'd hustle up the line on even the surest infield ground out,
        > >trying desperately for an infield hit. Like Pete Rose in the '70s, you
        > >can see that he wants that next bag.
        > >
        > >Sometimes it seems that Haru has more guts than brains, but still, the
        > >impression of Haru that always comes to mind is his smiling, rug-burned
        > >face after making a great diving catch in Tokyo Dome's center field. It
        > >was plays like that in 1998 that sent the 'Stars all the way to the
        > >Japanese championship pennant.
        > >
        > >The BayStars' number one draft pick this year, Kazunori Tanaka, looks to
        > >be a similar player to Haru - but faster! He's defiantly one I've got
        > >my eye on.
        > >
        > >Then there's ace pitcher Kuroki for the Chiba Lotte Marines. He first
        > >really got my attention during, of all things, a losing streak. The
        > >longest team losing streak in Pro Yakyu history, in fact. Nonetheless,
        > >Kuroki came in in relief with a lead against Kintetsu. It was looking
        > >like Lotte was going to finally break their losing streak. But, as fate
        > >would have it, Kuroki gave up a home run (2-run or 3-run? I don't
        > >remember) to blow the lead. He then knelt down on the mound sobbing.
        > >Concentrating all of his physical energy on getting those last three
        > >outs, and failing to do so, all of his emotional energy just burst. I
        > >know. You wouldn't expect a professional to do that sort of thing. But
        > >it shows that ball players are human, too.
        > >
        > >Kuroki continued to hold the attention of fans last season, starting out
        > >by beating super-rookie Matsuzaka in front of the only sell out crowd at
        > >Chiba Marine Stadium that I'd ever heard of. In his hero interview
        > >after the game, Kuroki appealed to the fans to all come out and support
        > >the team tomorrow. The next night hardly saw a few thousand fans. Oh,
        > >well. He tried. And it's Kuroki's "nice guy" image that really makes
        > >him likable.
        > >
        > >--
        > >Michael Westbay
        > >Work: Beacon-IT http://www.beacon-it.co.jp
        > >Home: http://www.seaple.icc.ne.jp/~westbay
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > >MAXIMIZE YOUR CARD, MINIMIZE YOUR RATE!
        > >Get a NextCard Visa, in 30 seconds! Get rates as low as
        > >0.0% Intro or 9.9% Fixed APR and no hidden fees.
        > >Apply NOW!
        > >http://click.egroups.com/1/2122/5/_/17431/_/952660133/
        > >
        > >-- Check out your group's private Chat room
        > >-- http://www.egroups.com/ChatPage?listName=j-ball&m=1
        > >
        > >
        >
        > ______________________________________________________
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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        > Get a NextCard Visa, in 30 seconds! Get rates as low as
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        > Apply NOW!
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        >
      • aladdinsane
        There are a few players I ve liked, but one that stands out is Ochiai. The reason for that was because he put his foot in the bucket (for those who ve never
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 10, 2000
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          There are a few players I've liked, but one that stands out is Ochiai. The reason for
          that was because he put his foot in the bucket (for those who've never heard this
          expression, it means that the hitter has a tendency to step outward as he started his swing.
          I may be mistaken here, but wasn't it Al Simmons who was known to do this, too?) and
          yet often took pitches down and away deep. I mean, it seems that he would have been
          easy to get out with change ups away, but he still always hammered the leagues'
          pitching staffs.
          One other thing for those of you who have seen Ochiai play a lot more than I have:
          Toward the end of his career, his defense was really poor. Was that true as well for the
          first part of his career before he got traded to the Dragons?

          Gary
          http://home.earthlink.net/~aladdinsane/index.html

          Takekuma Shingo wrote:

          > My favorite player is Tomohito Itoh of the Yakult Swallows. He won the
          > rookie of the Year the year the Swallows won the first Nippon Series in 15
          > years. Smae year,I became a resident alien of theU.S.
          > I like Sasaki,too
          >
          > >From: Michael Westbay <westbay@...>
          > >Reply-To: j-ball@egroups.com
          > >To: Pro Yakyu ML <j-ball@egroups.com>
          > >Subject: [j-ball] Who is your favorite player?
          > >Date: Fri, 10 Mar 2000 12:44:58 +0900
          > >
          > >Hi, all.
          > >
          > >Here's question #1: Who is your favorite player?
          > >
          > >That's a tough one. There was nobody I liked watching more than
          > >Kazuhiro Sasaki. He would take a deep breath, heaving his chest upward,
          > >before every pitch. That just shown of self confidence. One would hope
          > >that the BayStars were up by less than 4 runs going to the ninth every
          > >game, as that the the criteria for Sasaki to take the mound! But, alas,
          > >Sasaki has now graduated from Pro Yakyu and moved on to Seattle.
          > >
          > >On the BayStars, there are a lot of great players. Takuro Ishii,
          > >Takanori Suzuki, and Robert Rose are all top class. But I think that my
          > >favorite BayStar is center fielder Toshio Haru. He first got my
          > >attention when he would come on strong in the spring, then kind of
          > >disappear as the season progressed. "Haru ichiban" (a term meaning
          > >"first strong winds from the South of Spring") was a common play on
          > >words for him in the press. (It seems to me that that was also the
          > >slogan for a beer commercial a number of years ago, too, when it was
          > >first applied to Haru. The reason it's a play on words, though, is that
          > >"Haru" is synonymous with "Spring," although the characters for Haru's
          > >name are different, literally meaning "Wave Breaker.")
          > >
          > >Nonetheless, it was his all out guts play on defense on every ball hit
          > >to the outfield that made him a wonder to watch. On top of that, when
          > >at bat, he'd hustle up the line on even the surest infield ground out,
          > >trying desperately for an infield hit. Like Pete Rose in the '70s, you
          > >can see that he wants that next bag.
          > >
          > >Sometimes it seems that Haru has more guts than brains, but still, the
          > >impression of Haru that always comes to mind is his smiling, rug-burned
          > >face after making a great diving catch in Tokyo Dome's center field. It
          > >was plays like that in 1998 that sent the 'Stars all the way to the
          > >Japanese championship pennant.
          > >
          > >The BayStars' number one draft pick this year, Kazunori Tanaka, looks to
          > >be a similar player to Haru - but faster! He's defiantly one I've got
          > >my eye on.
          > >
          > >Then there's ace pitcher Kuroki for the Chiba Lotte Marines. He first
          > >really got my attention during, of all things, a losing streak. The
          > >longest team losing streak in Pro Yakyu history, in fact. Nonetheless,
          > >Kuroki came in in relief with a lead against Kintetsu. It was looking
          > >like Lotte was going to finally break their losing streak. But, as fate
          > >would have it, Kuroki gave up a home run (2-run or 3-run? I don't
          > >remember) to blow the lead. He then knelt down on the mound sobbing.
          > >Concentrating all of his physical energy on getting those last three
          > >outs, and failing to do so, all of his emotional energy just burst. I
          > >know. You wouldn't expect a professional to do that sort of thing. But
          > >it shows that ball players are human, too.
          > >
          > >Kuroki continued to hold the attention of fans last season, starting out
          > >by beating super-rookie Matsuzaka in front of the only sell out crowd at
          > >Chiba Marine Stadium that I'd ever heard of. In his hero interview
          > >after the game, Kuroki appealed to the fans to all come out and support
          > >the team tomorrow. The next night hardly saw a few thousand fans. Oh,
          > >well. He tried. And it's Kuroki's "nice guy" image that really makes
          > >him likable.
          > >
          > >--
          > >Michael Westbay
          > >Work: Beacon-IT http://www.beacon-it.co.jp
          > >Home: http://www.seaple.icc.ne.jp/~westbay
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > >MAXIMIZE YOUR CARD, MINIMIZE YOUR RATE!
          > >Get a NextCard Visa, in 30 seconds! Get rates as low as
          > >0.0% Intro or 9.9% Fixed APR and no hidden fees.
          > >Apply NOW!
          > >http://click.egroups.com/1/2122/5/_/17431/_/952660133/
          > >
          > >-- Check out your group's private Chat room
          > >-- http://www.egroups.com/ChatPage?listName=j-ball&m=1
          > >
          > >
          >
          > ______________________________________________________
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > DON'T HATE YOUR RATE!
          > Get a NextCard Visa, in 30 seconds! Get rates as low as
          > 0.0% Intro or 9.9% Fixed APR and no hidden fees.
          > Apply NOW!
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          >
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