Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

(US) Some scientists want to shave that milk mustache

Expand Messages
  • Animalconcerns Community
    (KRT) - In the last two years, the dairy industry has poured millions of dollars into a controversial advertising campaign that suggests drinking milk will
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2005
      (KRT) - In the last two years, the dairy industry has poured millions
      of dollars into a controversial advertising campaign that suggests
      drinking milk will help promote weight loss.

      "Get real. About losing weight," reads one of the print ads, which
      show television talk show host "Dr. Phil" McGraw modeling the telltale
      white milk mustache. "New studies suggest that getting calcium and
      protein from low-fat or fat-free milk could help you lose more weight
      than by just reducing calories."

      But a national health-advocacy group isn't buying the notion that milk
      has magical slimming properties. In its own ads placed last week, the
      Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine urged Dr. Phil - who is
      not a medical doctor but still dishes out plenty of health advice - to
      stop misleading consumers about milk's health benefits and to take a
      stand against false health claims.

      On Tuesday the committee also plans to announce that it will file two
      lawsuits challenging the claims by the dairy industry and certain
      dairy-product manufacturers at a Washington, D.C., press conference.
      Earlier this year, the committee called the "Got Milk?" weight-loss
      ads "dishonest" and filed false-labeling petitions with the Federal
      Trade Commission and the Food and Drug Administration. The agencies
      are investigating.

      "The vast majority of clinical studies show that adding dairy products
      to the diet does nothing whatsoever for weight control; in some cases,
      it encourages weight gain," said Amy Joy Lanou, the senior nutrition
      scientist for committee, which advocates preventive medicine through
      nutrition and a vegetarian diet.

      --
      full story:
      http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/12032584.htm

      -----
      http://www.animalconcerns.org/ - More News Headlines (RSS Feed),
      Events, E-Mail Lists, Jobs, Organizations, and Forums (discussion
      boards), ! Try searching for the news item on Animalconcerns.org!
    • Animalconcerns Community
      (KRT) - In the last two years, the dairy industry has poured millions of dollars into a controversial advertising campaign that suggests drinking milk will
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 1, 2005
        (KRT) - In the last two years, the dairy industry has poured millions
        of dollars into a controversial advertising campaign that suggests
        drinking milk will help promote weight loss.

        "Get real. About losing weight," reads one of the print ads, which
        show television talk show host "Dr. Phil" McGraw modeling the telltale
        white milk mustache. "New studies suggest that getting calcium and
        protein from low-fat or fat-free milk could help you lose more weight
        than by just reducing calories."

        But a national health-advocacy group isn't buying the notion that milk
        has magical slimming properties. In its own ads placed last week, the
        Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine urged Dr. Phil - who is
        not a medical doctor but still dishes out plenty of health advice - to
        stop misleading consumers about milk's health benefits and to take a
        stand against false health claims.

        On Tuesday the committee also plans to announce that it will file two
        lawsuits challenging the claims by the dairy industry and certain
        dairy-product manufacturers at a Washington, D.C., press conference.
        Earlier this year, the committee called the "Got Milk?" weight-loss
        ads "dishonest" and filed false-labeling petitions with the Federal
        Trade Commission and the Food and Drug Administration. The agencies
        are investigating.

        "The vast majority of clinical studies show that adding dairy products
        to the diet does nothing whatsoever for weight control; in some cases,
        it encourages weight gain," said Amy Joy Lanou, the senior nutrition
        scientist for committee, which advocates preventive medicine through
        nutrition and a vegetarian diet.

        --
        full story:
        http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/12032584.htm

        -----
        http://www.animalconcerns.org/ - More News Headlines (RSS Feed),
        Events, E-Mail Lists, Jobs, Organizations, and Forums (discussion
        boards), ! Try searching for the news item on Animalconcerns.org!
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.