Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

(US) Eyes on the fries

Expand Messages
  • Animalconcerns Community
    Two years after McDonald s own deadline for reducing trans fats, the french fry has thus far snatched defeat from the jaws of victory. The heavyweight among
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Two years after McDonald's' own deadline for reducing trans fats, the
      french fry has thus far snatched defeat from the jaws of victory.

      The heavyweight among fast food chains had announced with fanfare that
      the amount of trans fats in its cooking oil would be cut almost in
      half by February 2003. After that, a more ambitious goal: McDonald's
      planned to eliminate this form of disease-causing grease, right down
      to the last McNugget.

      Today, however, an order of fries remains as trans-laden as ever,
      leaving consumer advocates with a supersized disbelief.
      ...
      McDonald's has been using trans fats since 1990. At the time it turned
      trans, the company was looking for a way to reduce the saturated fat
      and cholesterol coming out of its fryers. Trans fats are, before a
      chemical transformation, vegetable oil. The hope was that the trans
      fats would be no harder on a customer's health than canola or corn
      oil.

      But the evidence against trans fat was already gathering, and it has
      now become one of the major controversies in the American food
      industry. The new U.S. Dietary Guidelines, released just this month,
      urge Americans to keep their trans-fat consumption as close to zero as
      possible.
      ...
      Dr. Dean Ornish, for one, believes these are more than just claims for
      public relations. For almost 30 years, Ornish has touted the benefits
      of a diet very low in fat. In 2002, the devoted vegetarian was one of
      the many experts who praised McDonald's for abandoning trans fats.
      He's now consulting with the company on ways to make its food better
      for the 23 million Americans who eat it each day.

      "I think they remain committed to achieving the trans fatty acid
      goal," says Ornish, who runs the Preventive Medicine Research
      Institute in Sausalito, Calif. "The truth is that it was easier to
      reduce it in some products than others."

      --
      full story:
      http://www.hollandsentinel.com/stories/020105/lif_020105029.shtml

      -----
      Your Portal to Animal Concerns Forum (discussion board), More News
      Headlines, Events, E-Mail Lists, Jobs, and Organizations! Try
      searching for the news item on Animalconcerns!
      http://www.animalconcerns.org/
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.