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US - Town may change name to Got Milk?

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  • Dave Shishkoff
    http://abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s715564.htm Udder nonsense - town may change name to Got Milk? With nary an udder in sight, the small Californian town of
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2002
      http://abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s715564.htm

      Udder nonsense - town may change name to Got Milk?

      With nary an udder in sight, the small Californian town of Biggs is
      pondering a name change to 'Got Milk?'.

      Town officials say Biggs - a community of 1,793 people just north of
      Sacramento - will hold a public hearing on November 18 to consider an offer
      by the California Milk Processors Board officially change its name
      officially to "Got Milk?".

      The change would mark the 10th anniversary of a well-known milk advertising
      campaign in the US.
      Milk board executive director Jeff Manning said says the move "is not meant
      as a prank".

      "We would love to have Got Milk?, California, on the map," he said.

      But a better name change for the town might be Got Rice? as it is now a rice
      farming community.

      Biggs was the only one of about 20 small Californian towns to respond to an
      offer from the milk processors board to consider changing its name to "Got
      Milk?" - the slogan of a national milk campaign that has spawned wildly
      popular TV ad spots and famous print advertisements.

      Biggs Mayor Sharleta Callaway told the San Francisco Chronicle that she felt
      the town should take a look at the Got Milk? proposal.

      "It's interesting, if nothing else," Ms Callaway said.

      Mr Manning says the milk processors board is not attempting to "buy" Biggs'
      name and that there is no explicit promise of funding or aid in the proposed
      deal.

      "First and foremost the benefit would be in the publicity and notoriety in
      changing the name to Got Milk? We are not cutting a check," Mr Manning said.

      However, he added that the milk processing board would be open to helping
      Biggs establish a "Got Milk?" Museum or to do something for the town's
      children.

      "I think they should serve the world's greatest milkshakes in Got Milk?," he
      said.

      Public opinion in Biggs - which was named for a local family almost 100
      years ago - is hard to gauge, although some residents have raised doubts
      about what the name change would mean for institutions like local school
      sports teams.

      "They're the Wolverines now. Does this mean they'd become the Milk Cows and
      that the cheerleaders will wear udders on their heads?" Mike Bottorff, a
      Biggs salesman, told the Chronicle.

      "Will graduation gowns at Got Milk? High be white with black spots?" he
      asked. "Will the blue-and-white cop cars be white with black spots? I think
      we're doing pretty good with what we got."

      If Biggs does go for the bait and change its name, it won't be the first
      small American town to rename itself as part of an advertising campaign.

      The town of Halfway, Oregon, changed its name to "Half.com" in 2000, in
      return for $US73,000 from a Philadelphia Internet e-commerce company of the
      same name.

      Much earlier, in 1950, Hot Springs, New Mexico changed its name to "Truth or
      Consequences" as part of a publicity gimmick arranged by a famous national
      radio quiz show.
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