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(PI) Pros and cons of a macrobiotic diet

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  • AnimalConcerns.org
    [Manila Bulletin] Is a macrobiotic diet the same as a vegetarian diet? If not, how do they differ? What are the benefits and disadvantages, if there are any,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2008
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      [Manila Bulletin]

      Is a macrobiotic diet the same as a vegetarian diet? If not, how do
      they differ? What are the benefits and disadvantages, if there are
      any, of a macrobiotic diet? - Stella M., Manila

      A macrobiotic diet is not synonymous with a vegetarian diet because
      although plant products form the bulk of the macrobiotic diet, the
      diet also allows for some animal products.
      ...
      What are the benefits of a macrobiotic diet? Definitely, a macrobiotic
      diet, because of its vegetarian and organic nature, has some pros,
      health-wise. Plant products are healthier than animal products because
      they do not contain cholesterol and saturated fats—substances that
      predispose one to many diseases; their total fat content is lower than
      in animal products; they have high fiber content; they contain lesser
      additives, preservatives, and other unnatural chemicals; and they do
      not transmit animal-borne diseases such as anthrax, bovine
      encephalitis, tapeworms, and certain flatworms. Furthermore, the
      organic nature of a macrobiotic diet ensures that chemical residues of
      pesticides, herbicides, hormones, etc. that are used in conventional
      farming do not accumulate within the body. However, the claim of some
      adherents of the diet that numerous serious diseases including cancer
      and AIDS can be prevented and cured by the diet are unsubstantiated by
      controlled scientific research. A macrobiotic diet also has its
      downside. The assortment of amino acids (the building blocks of
      protein) in the macrobiotic diet is not as good as in animal meat.
      Likewise, the diet is short on calcium, zinc, vitamin D, riboflavin,
      and vitamin B12, which comes only from animal sources. It is also low
      in iron, making the person susceptible to anemia.

      --
      full story:
      http://www.mb.com.ph/20081102139654.html

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