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20696(U.S.) The Way of All Flesh

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  • MaryFinelli@...
    Apr 22, 2013
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      see also:
      WRITER GOES UNDERCOVER AS USDA INSPECOR AT SCHUYLER BEEF PLANT
      Lincoln Journal Star, Richard Piersol, April 18, 2013
      http://tinyurl.com/d6mwoex
       
       
      THE WAY OF ALL FLESH
      Undercover in an Industrial Slaughterhouse
      Harper's Magazine, Ted Conover, May 2013

      The cattle arrive in perforated silver trailers called cattle pots that let in wind and weather and vent out their hot breath and flatus. It’s hard to see inside a cattle pot. The drivers are in a hurry to unload and leave, and are always speeding by. (When I ask Lefty how meat gets bruised, he says, “You ever see how those guys drive?”) The trucks have come from feedlots, some nearby, some in western Nebraska, a few in Iowa. The plant slaughters about 5,100 cattle each day, and a standard double-decker cattle pot holds only about forty, so there’s a constant stream of trucks pulling in to disgorge, even before the line starts up a little after six a.m.
       
      First the cattle are weighed. Then they are guided into narrow outdoor pens angled diagonally toward the entrance to the kill floor. A veterinarian arrives before our shift and begins to inspect them; she looks for open wounds, problems walking, signs of disease. When their time comes, the cattle will be urged by workers toward the curving ramp that leads up into the building. The ramp has a roof and no sharp turns. It was designed by the livestock expert Temple Grandin, and the curves and penumbral light are believed to soothe the animals in their final moments. But the soothing goes only so far.
       

      http://harpers.org/archive/2013/05/the-way-of-all-flesh/
       
       
       


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