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distance learning of interpreting

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  • Miriam Shlesinger
    Dear Leongko, You wrote: I would like to discuss the issue of distance education in interpreting if there is anyone who is interested in it. I am certainly
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 23, 2001
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      Dear Leongko,

      You wrote: I would like to discuss the issue of distance
      education in interpreting if there is anyone who is interested in it.

      I am certainly interested, but have not had any experience with it. Source materials that we use have included:

      prepared or impromptu talks by the teacher
      prepared or impromptu talks by other students
      audio tapes read expressly for classroom use
      audio tapes from actual conferences
      audio tapes of talks or interviews given on the radio
      video tapes read expressly for classroom use
      video tapes from actual conferences
      video tapes of talks or interviews given on TV

      As for anything coming over the net - whether via Real Audio, radio channels or whatever - I always thought that the sound quality would not be good enough, and/or that adapting it to classroom use would be impracticable. But this may be a misconception.

      Our main strategy in recent years has been to ask our technician to tape (preferably on video) talks given on campus at various conferences (mostly local) that happen to take place there, or even (occasionally) in ordinary lectures in other departments. We also try to obtain recordings (usually audio, rarely video) at conferences where we work. These are our two main sources of non-teacher-based materials, and we find these to be our "most favorite" type of materials, since they are (1) authentic (2) varied. The two drawbacks: (1) sometimes the sound quality is poor, for whatever reason, so that we wind up not being able to use the recording; (2) authentic materials are often not suitable for classroom use (too fast, too decontextualized, too esoteric etc).

      Given all these sources of materials, we actually have more than enough material for the time available - *and yet* I'd be delighted to learn how to explore new sources, partly because it would give us more non-local materials, including historic speeches etc., and partly because if it's out there, why not try to use it.

      Thanks for the idea, and I look forward to learning more about it.
      Miriam

      Miriam Shlesinger
      Bar-Ilan University
      Interpreter and Translator
      Phone: 972-3-6417814
      Fax: 972-3-6430828
      http://www.biu.ac.il/faculty/shlesm




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Hannelore Lee-Jahnke
      Dear Miriam, I just had your name in this message and thought to give you much love. Are you doing well? Best HAnnelore
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 23, 2001
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        Dear Miriam,

        I just had your name in this message and thought to give you much love.

        Are you doing well?

        Best

        HAnnelore
        _________________________________________

        Hannelore Lee-Jahnke
        École de traduction et d'interprétation
        Université de Genève
        40 boul. du Pont D'Arve
        1207 Genève, Suisse
        Tél.: 41-22-311-4870
        Fax : 41-22-310-54-10
        http://www.unige.ch/eti/staff/lee-jahnke
        __________________________________________
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Miriam Shlesinger" <shlesm@...>
        To: <leongko@...>
        Cc: <itit@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: vendredi 23 novembre 2001 16:15
        Subject: [itit] distance learning of interpreting


        >
        > Dear Leongko,
        >
        > You wrote: I would like to discuss the issue of distance
        > education in interpreting if there is anyone who is interested in it.
        >
        > I am certainly interested, but have not had any experience with it. Source
        materials that we use have included:
        >
        > prepared or impromptu talks by the teacher
        > prepared or impromptu talks by other students
        > audio tapes read expressly for classroom use
        > audio tapes from actual conferences
        > audio tapes of talks or interviews given on the radio
        > video tapes read expressly for classroom use
        > video tapes from actual conferences
        > video tapes of talks or interviews given on TV
        >
        > As for anything coming over the net - whether via Real Audio, radio
        channels or whatever - I always thought that the sound quality would not be
        good enough, and/or that adapting it to classroom use would be
        impracticable. But this may be a misconception.
        >
        > Our main strategy in recent years has been to ask our technician to tape
        (preferably on video) talks given on campus at various conferences (mostly
        local) that happen to take place there, or even (occasionally) in ordinary
        lectures in other departments. We also try to obtain recordings (usually
        audio, rarely video) at conferences where we work. These are our two main
        sources of non-teacher-based materials, and we find these to be our "most
        favorite" type of materials, since they are (1) authentic (2) varied. The
        two drawbacks: (1) sometimes the sound quality is poor, for whatever reason,
        so that we wind up not being able to use the recording; (2) authentic
        materials are often not suitable for classroom use (too fast, too
        decontextualized, too esoteric etc).
        >
        > Given all these sources of materials, we actually have more than enough
        material for the time available - *and yet* I'd be delighted to learn how to
        explore new sources, partly because it would give us more non-local
        materials, including historic speeches etc., and partly because if it's out
        there, why not try to use it.
        >
        > Thanks for the idea, and I look forward to learning more about it.
        > Miriam
        >
        > Miriam Shlesinger
        > Bar-Ilan University
        > Interpreter and Translator
        > Phone: 972-3-6417814
        > Fax: 972-3-6430828
        > http://www.biu.ac.il/faculty/shlesm
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • David Ashworth
        I think there are two basic issues concerning interpreter training on the Web. 1. I am not so sure it is very useful for training for conventional situations,
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 23, 2001
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          I think there are two basic issues concerning interpreter training on the
          Web.
          1. I am not so sure it is very useful for training for conventional
          situations, mainly because even in videoconferencing (an expensive
          proposition!) there is no eye contact, and recorded materials lack the
          spontaneity of the real situation. (Of course, as I admitted earlier, I am
          not involved much in interpretation so maybe I am off the mark).

          2. As the Web and the Internet become more widely used as a communication
          platform, the kind of language support for that communication will entail
          new kinds of T&I, such as translation of bulletin board/ discussion group
          interactions.

          I am thinking, for example, of a project a Japanese company
          was contemplating doing for an intranet that would include translations of
          Lotus Notes interactions --one interesting aspect of that was that the
          source language of documents from the company would be Japanese, while the
          targets included English, Thai, Indonesian, Malay, and others. THe
          question of relays came up i.e. whether to translate directly from
          Japanese or from English. Another relevant linguistic issue was the extent
          of "distance" between Indonesian and Malay and whether there was a way of
          "leveraging" the translation of one of these into the other, for example
          using MT to go from one to the other and post editing, since they are
          remarkably similar languages.

          Also, in a project I participated in last year, a pilot course on
          teletranslation with my colleague, Minako O'Hagan out of NZ, we looked at
          problems of handling the multilingual support of text chat (simultaneous
          translation of chat, which we dubbed "transterpreting"), voice chat (still
          too primitive to be of immediate value), teaaching sight translation of
          web page documents (the class is in cyberspace, and we took 'guided tours'
          of selected websites, with the students practicing sight translation and
          interpretation of the voice messages of the guides).

          Also, the phenomenon known as "i-mode" in Japan, the use of hand-held
          cell-phone like devices that can also have videocameras attached, have
          become the dominant vehicle for internet communications and oopens the
          possibility / potential need for language support of communications on
          these devices. Minako O'Hagan has written about this in the LISA
          Newsletters.

          The Internet, shaky and spotty as it is, is becoming a major medium for
          multilingual communication, and some of our training efforts using the web
          need to address the needs and procedures required by that meedium
          Dave Ashworth, University of Hawaii.
        • Miriam Shlesinger
          Dear Hannelore, How nice to hear your voice . Yes, I m fine personally, though of course events in the world around us, both near and far, take their toll in
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 23, 2001
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            Dear Hannelore,
            How nice to "hear your voice". Yes, I'm fine personally, though of course
            events in the world around us, both near and far, take their toll in terms
            of personal wellbeing too. But my family's doing well, and I enjoy my
            teaching, so I really can't complain. And of course, having the PhD behind
            me makes a big difference psychologically... To add to the "feel-good
            factor" (such an American expression, I know) the book that Franz
            Poechhacker and I have edited - the Interpreting Studies Reader, Routledge -
            will be coming out next month.

            And how about you? We haven't shared a conference in a very long time, so
            I'm not up to date. Still I enjoyed seeing the special issue of Meta that
            you guest-edited. Chapeaux!! Actually, I just looked up your website now,
            and I must admit that I'm overwhelmed! You have an amazing span of
            activities, many of which I was not even aware of. (This did not start out
            to be fan-mail, but I can't help it.)

            I will be in Geneva in January. Will you be there? I'll be teaching at ETI
            for a few days, and would love to "do coffee" if you're around.

            In any case, thanks for touching bases - and very warm regards -
            Yours,
            Miriam




            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Hannelore Lee-Jahnke <Hannelore.Lee-Jahnke@...>
            To: <itit@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, November 23, 2001 5:27 PM
            Subject: Re: [itit] distance learning of interpreting


            > Dear Miriam,
            >
            > I just had your name in this message and thought to give you much love.
            >
            > Are you doing well?
            >
            > Best
            >
            > HAnnelore
            > _________________________________________
            >
            > Hannelore Lee-Jahnke
            > École de traduction et d'interprétation
            > Université de Genève
            > 40 boul. du Pont D'Arve
            > 1207 Genève, Suisse
            > Tél.: 41-22-311-4870
            > Fax : 41-22-310-54-10
            > http://www.unige.ch/eti/staff/lee-jahnke
            > __________________________________________
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "Miriam Shlesinger" <shlesm@...>
            > To: <leongko@...>
            > Cc: <itit@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: vendredi 23 novembre 2001 16:15
            > Subject: [itit] distance learning of interpreting
            >
            >
            > >
            > > Dear Leongko,
            > >
            > > You wrote: I would like to discuss the issue of distance
            > > education in interpreting if there is anyone who is interested in it.
            > >
            > > I am certainly interested, but have not had any experience with it.
            Source
            > materials that we use have included:
            > >
            > > prepared or impromptu talks by the teacher
            > > prepared or impromptu talks by other students
            > > audio tapes read expressly for classroom use
            > > audio tapes from actual conferences
            > > audio tapes of talks or interviews given on the radio
            > > video tapes read expressly for classroom use
            > > video tapes from actual conferences
            > > video tapes of talks or interviews given on TV
            > >
            > > As for anything coming over the net - whether via Real Audio, radio
            > channels or whatever - I always thought that the sound quality would not
            be
            > good enough, and/or that adapting it to classroom use would be
            > impracticable. But this may be a misconception.
            > >
            > > Our main strategy in recent years has been to ask our technician to tape
            > (preferably on video) talks given on campus at various conferences (mostly
            > local) that happen to take place there, or even (occasionally) in ordinary
            > lectures in other departments. We also try to obtain recordings (usually
            > audio, rarely video) at conferences where we work. These are our two main
            > sources of non-teacher-based materials, and we find these to be our "most
            > favorite" type of materials, since they are (1) authentic (2) varied. The
            > two drawbacks: (1) sometimes the sound quality is poor, for whatever
            reason,
            > so that we wind up not being able to use the recording; (2) authentic
            > materials are often not suitable for classroom use (too fast, too
            > decontextualized, too esoteric etc).
            > >
            > > Given all these sources of materials, we actually have more than enough
            > material for the time available - *and yet* I'd be delighted to learn how
            to
            > explore new sources, partly because it would give us more non-local
            > materials, including historic speeches etc., and partly because if it's
            out
            > there, why not try to use it.
            > >
            > > Thanks for the idea, and I look forward to learning more about it.
            > > Miriam
            > >
            > > Miriam Shlesinger
            > > Bar-Ilan University
            > > Interpreter and Translator
            > > Phone: 972-3-6417814
            > > Fax: 972-3-6430828
            > > http://www.biu.ac.il/faculty/shlesm
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • leongkoau@yahoo.com.au
            To those who are interested in this topic, Because I am at a remote site during the symposium and have restricted access to the Net, I have not been able to
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 2, 2001
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              To those who are interested in this topic,

              Because I am at a remote site during the symposium and have
              restricted access to the Net, I have not been able to make a reply to
              your responses promptly. My apologies.

              According to the responses, I am under the impression that most of us
              are looking at the issue in the context of conference interpreting.
              Though my research in the area of training community interpreters by
              distance mode, I somehow believe that the training of conference
              interpreters by distance mode, in spite of its difficulties, might be
              a little easier than community interpreters because it does not
              require a high level of verbal and visual interaction as community
              interpreting.

              I also had the experience of giving materials to students and asking
              them to practise by themselves. But this takes place only for a very
              short period of time -- e.g. when we are going to a conference and
              have to fill in the gap of teaching. If I am suggesting that we are
              using this method, or a modified method of this type, to train
              students throughout the whole process of training, do we believe that
              will it work? If not, this might provide some inference to 100% on-
              line programs.

              Well, I am still researching and there are already some other
              attempts in this field around the world. I hope we could find a way
              to serve the needs of education in the modern world. Thank you all
              for making responses to this topic. You are most welcome to write to
              me at leongko@...

              Leong Ko
              Deakin University
              Australia
            • carmen valero
              An answer to Leong Ko Glad to hear something about Community Interpreting. We are now developing a program in Spain (and also an international conference on
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 3, 2001
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                An answer to Leong Ko
                Glad to hear something about Community Interpreting. We are now developing a
                program in Spain (and also an international conference on the topic for next
                February) and I must say that I am a more experience teacher of translation.
                I agree with you that emotianl involment and visual contact is more relevant
                in CI, also the practicioners are sometimes not so well prepared which means
                that part of what has been said in the Symposium is hard to apply.
                I´d like to hear more about what you do.
                Carmen Valero
                mcarmen.valero@...
              • W. Fred Roy III
                Since 1970 I have practiced community interpretation. Administrative, legal and pragmatic questions have been a real part of our (all of us who practice CI
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 4, 2001
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                  Since 1970 I have practiced community interpretation. Administrative,
                  legal and pragmatic questions have been a real part of our (all of us
                  who practice CI everyday) professional lives.

                  What we need is theorectical studies, back up with reliable research
                  that can document, explain what we do and therefore, in a practical
                  sense, allow us to pass-on what we do to graduate students of the
                  professions of interpretation and translation.

                  Pedagogically and technically I beleive this can be done (with the
                  exception of supervised observations, practicums and internships)
                  on-line.

                  I'm interested in learning more about the CI
                  conference in Spain. Further, please share any information who have
                  with regards to presenters and how one would apply to be either hired
                  for presentation work and or make presentations as part of attending
                  said conference.

                  Thanks.

                  Fred



                  -------------------
                  > An answer to Leong Ko
                  > Glad to hear something about Community Interpreting. We are now
                  developing a
                  > program in Spain (and also an international conference on the topic
                  for next
                  > February) and I must say that I am a more experience teacher of
                  translation.
                  > I agree with you that emotianl involment and visual contact is more
                  relevant
                  > in CI, also the practicioners are sometimes not so well prepared
                  which means
                  > that part of what has been said in the Symposium is hard to apply.
                  > I´d like to hear more about what you do.
                  > Carmen Valero
                  > mcarmen.valero@...
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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                  W. Fred Roy III
                  430 Indiana Avenue, Apt 122
                  Indianapolis, IN 46202-3212
                  504-231-2267 cell 317-916-9941 home
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