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Re: [israel-food] home-made vanilla extract

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  • ncoom gilbar
    Ruth- Roughly how much is 50 grams? One bean? More? Less? I have never strained, and it hasn t caused any problems. shalom, Ncoom ... §§§§
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 30, 2004
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      Ruth-
      Roughly how much is 50 grams? One bean? More? Less?

      I have never strained, and it hasn't caused any problems.
      shalom,
      Ncoom
      On Dec 1, 2004, at 8:58 AM, Ruth Baks wrote:

      >
      >
      > Making your own vanilla extract is easy, and a great cost saver.
      >
      > First of all, I don't recommend using ethanol because it has a very
      > sharp bite. I prefer to use vodka, because it is neutral and will
      > not impart any flavor, allowing the vanilla flavor to shine.
      >
      > I use 50 gm. of vanilla beans to 1 liter of vodka (45% alc/vol) to
      > make mine. Check the percentage of alc/vol printed on the bottle;
      > there are many different strengths offered. (By law, commercially
      > sold pure vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35% alcohol by
      > volume.)
      >
      > Cut the vanilla beans into small pieces and drop into a bottle of
      > vodka (pour a little vodka out first, as the vanilla beans will cause
      > some displacement.) That's it! Now you just have to wait for it to
      > steep.
      >
      > I'll tell you why I cut up the beans, rather than leaving them whole.
      > The power of the infusion comes from keeping the essential matter (in
      > this case vanilla, which provides the 'essence') submerged in the
      > liquid (in this case, vodka.) Vanilla beans are long and thin, and
      > will stand up vertically in the bottle. If you are making a small
      > amount (less than a full bottle) the vodka level may not cover all
      > the beans. Even when using a full bottle of vodka, little by little
      > this will be poured off as you use the extract, meaning the upper
      > part of the (uncut) beans will quickly become exposed to the air. The
      > longer the beans steep totally submerged the stronger the flavor of
      > the extract. That is why I wrote that I pour off only a small amount
      > at a time (enough to fill a 100 ml. bottle - less than 4 oz.) and
      > keep this on my spice shelf for regular use. The remainder I leave in
      > the vodka bottle to further infuse with flavor. By cutting up the
      > vanilla beans, the pieces will sink to the bottom of the bottle so
      > even as I pour off the extract and the vodka level drops, the
      > remainder continues to infuse as all of the vanilla bean pieces are
      > submerged, and the extract continues to develop flavor.
      >
      > Aside from this, cutting open the seed pods gives greater access
      > (maximum contact) to the flavor cells. Remember, you will need to
      > filter the extract if the pods were cut -- the seeds are very tiny
      > (like ground poppy) so I recommend straining through something very
      > fine, eg. coffee filter paper.
      >
      > Okay, so now it has to steep for a couple of months. It will get
      > darker and darker over time; strain before using. I strain and
      > transfer a small amount into a small bottle for everyday use
      > (allowing the original batch in the vodka bottle to further intensify
      > in flavor.)
      >
      > Here's the fun part: the same vanilla beans may be reused to make
      > more essence! When the liter is all used up, I refill the vodka 50%
      > of the original (using 500 cc or 1/2 liter of vodka) for the second
      > infusion. When that is used up I may go for a 3rd infusion, using 50%
      > of the previous (this time 250 cc or 1/4 liter of vodka) -- as long
      > as the color comes through the flavor will too.
      >
      > You really cannot imagine how much flavor these beans contain! I
      > remember when I first read about doing a 2nd or 3rd infusion (using
      > the same beans) I was skeptical, thinking that this was stretching
      > things too far... but when I tried it, I found that it really works!
      > As long as you see the color come through, the flavor will also be
      > there. As I explained, I cut the vodka in half for each successive
      > infusion, compensating for depleted flavor by raising the
      > concentration factor.
      >
      > I have been making all my own vanilla extract for years using this
      > method with excellent results.
      >
      > Commercial vanilla extract is made from the lowest quality vanilla
      > beans: rejects and broken pieces that cannot be sold in open market.
      > When making the extract yourself, however, you have control over the
      > quality of the vanilla beans used.
      >
      > Keep in mind to use kosher le'pesach alcohol (vodka) and the vanilla
      > extract may be used all year round, including on Pesach.
      >
      > Good luck!
      >
      > Ruth Baks
      > Jerusalem
      >
      >
      > At 6:41 PM +0000 11/30/04, Leila Barbosa wrote:
      >> I want to make my own vanilla extract from vanilla beans and ethyl
      >> alcohol
      >> (ethanol). However I don't know the procedure. I need to know the
      >> pitfalls,
      >> if any, that might make the vanilla flavor less than it could be. If
      >> you
      >> know how to do it, please advise me. I will really appreciate your
      >> advice; I
      >> can't start without it.
      >>
      >> Leila Barbosa ..... lolokolo989@...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      §§§§ §§§§
      ~~~~~~
      ncoom@...
      Gilbars at Large http://www.shilo.org.il/gilbar/
      Shilo http://www.shilo.org.il
    • Mirjam Dorn
      I ve been using Ruth s method since she first posted this here months ago, and it makes wonderful vanilla. I also scrape the beans before submerging them in
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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        I've been using Ruth's method since she first posted this here
        months ago, and it makes wonderful vanilla.

        I also scrape the beans before submerging them in the vodka, you get
        lots of extra vanilla flavor.

        -- Mirj

        --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, Ruth Baks <PosUnltd@n...> wrote:
        >
        > Making your own vanilla extract is easy, and a great cost saver.
        >
        > First of all, I don't recommend using ethanol because it has a
        very
        > sharp bite. I prefer to use vodka, because it is neutral and will
        > not impart any flavor, allowing the vanilla flavor to shine.
        >
        > I use 50 gm. of vanilla beans to 1 liter of vodka (45% alc/vol) to
        > make mine. Check the percentage of alc/vol printed on the bottle;
        > there are many different strengths offered. (By law, commercially
        > sold pure vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35% alcohol by
        > volume.)
        >
        > Cut the vanilla beans into small pieces and drop into a bottle of
        > vodka (pour a little vodka out first, as the vanilla beans will
        cause
        > some displacement.) That's it! Now you just have to wait for it
        to
        > steep.
        >
        > I'll tell you why I cut up the beans, rather than leaving them
        whole.
        > The power of the infusion comes from keeping the essential matter
        (in
        > this case vanilla, which provides the 'essence') submerged in the
        > liquid (in this case, vodka.) Vanilla beans are long and thin, and
        > will stand up vertically in the bottle. If you are making a small
        > amount (less than a full bottle) the vodka level may not cover all
        > the beans. Even when using a full bottle of vodka, little by
        little
        > this will be poured off as you use the extract, meaning the upper
        > part of the (uncut) beans will quickly become exposed to the air.
        The
        > longer the beans steep totally submerged the stronger the flavor
        of
        > the extract. That is why I wrote that I pour off only a small
        amount
        > at a time (enough to fill a 100 ml. bottle - less than 4 oz.) and
        > keep this on my spice shelf for regular use. The remainder I leave
        in
        > the vodka bottle to further infuse with flavor. By cutting up the
        > vanilla beans, the pieces will sink to the bottom of the bottle so
        > even as I pour off the extract and the vodka level drops, the
        > remainder continues to infuse as all of the vanilla bean pieces
        are
        > submerged, and the extract continues to develop flavor.
        >
        > Aside from this, cutting open the seed pods gives greater access
        > (maximum contact) to the flavor cells. Remember, you will need to
        > filter the extract if the pods were cut -- the seeds are very tiny
        > (like ground poppy) so I recommend straining through something
        very
        > fine, eg. coffee filter paper.
        >
        > Okay, so now it has to steep for a couple of months. It will get
        > darker and darker over time; strain before using. I strain and
        > transfer a small amount into a small bottle for everyday use
        > (allowing the original batch in the vodka bottle to further
        intensify
        > in flavor.)
        >
        > Here's the fun part: the same vanilla beans may be reused to make
        > more essence! When the liter is all used up, I refill the vodka
        50%
        > of the original (using 500 cc or 1/2 liter of vodka) for the
        second
        > infusion. When that is used up I may go for a 3rd infusion, using
        50%
        > of the previous (this time 250 cc or 1/4 liter of vodka) -- as
        long
        > as the color comes through the flavor will too.
        >
        > You really cannot imagine how much flavor these beans contain! I
        > remember when I first read about doing a 2nd or 3rd infusion
        (using
        > the same beans) I was skeptical, thinking that this was stretching
        > things too far... but when I tried it, I found that it really
        works!
        > As long as you see the color come through, the flavor will also be
        > there. As I explained, I cut the vodka in half for each successive
        > infusion, compensating for depleted flavor by raising the
        > concentration factor.
        >
        > I have been making all my own vanilla extract for years using this
        > method with excellent results.
        >
        > Commercial vanilla extract is made from the lowest quality vanilla
        > beans: rejects and broken pieces that cannot be sold in open
        market.
        > When making the extract yourself, however, you have control over
        the
        > quality of the vanilla beans used.
        >
        > Keep in mind to use kosher le'pesach alcohol (vodka) and the
        vanilla
        > extract may be used all year round, including on Pesach.
        >
        > Good luck!
        >
        > Ruth Baks
        > Jerusalem
        >
        >
        > At 6:41 PM +0000 11/30/04, Leila Barbosa wrote:
        > >I want to make my own vanilla extract from vanilla beans and
        ethyl alcohol
        > >(ethanol). However I don't know the procedure. I need to know the
        pitfalls,
        > >if any, that might make the vanilla flavor less than it could be.
        If you
        > >know how to do it, please advise me. I will really appreciate
        your advice; I
        > >can't start without it.
        > >
        > >Leila Barbosa ..... lolokolo989@h...
      • Chava
        Hi one bottle of vodka and 2 vanilla beans.Put thevanilla beans in the bottle and store it in a cool place for 4 -6 weeks.It is great. Behatzlacha Chava ...
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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          Hi
          one bottle of vodka and 2 vanilla beans.Put thevanilla beans in the bottle
          and store it in a cool place for 4 -6 weeks.It is great.
          Behatzlacha
          Chava

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Leila Barbosa [mailto:lolokolo989@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 8:42 PM
          To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [israel-food] home-made vanilla extract




          I want to make my own vanilla extract from vanilla beans and ethyl alcohol
          (ethanol). However I don't know the procedure. I need to know the pitfalls,
          if any, that might make the vanilla flavor less than it could be. If you
          know how to do it, please advise me. I will really appreciate your advice; I
          can't start without it.

          Leila Barbosa ..... lolokolo989@...

          _________________________________________________________________
          Use MSN Messenger to send music and pics to your friends
          http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger








          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • menucha
          thanks for reminding me. I usually plan my vanilla bottles so that they re ready for pesach. I use kosher lepesach vodka and keep the bottle out of the
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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            thanks for reminding me. I usually plan my vanilla bottles so that
            they're ready for pesach. I use kosher lepesach vodka and keep the
            bottle out of the kitchen. Does anyone have recommendaions for where to
            buy the vanilla beans?
            menucha
          • Ruth Baks
            The weight depends on the size of the pods. In Israel they usually come in large and small. I really don t remember how many pods you get for 50 grams,
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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              The weight depends on the size of the pods. In Israel they usually
              come in large and small. I really don't remember how many pods you
              get for 50 grams, (maybe 10?) However, if you buy at a spice store,
              they can weigh them for you.

              About straining, it is not a requirement, but it will effect the
              appearance of your end food product. In some cases its presence
              could be complimentary (eg. interesting speckles in French vanilla
              ice cream) but in other cases it may not be appreciated (eg. I once
              served a cocktail which included unstrained vanilla, later one guest
              approached me, asking "What is that black thing?" It could be
              perceived as a piece of grit.

              Ruth Baks
              Jerusalem

              At 9:50 AM +0200 12/1/04, ncoom gilbar wrote:
              >Ruth-
              >Roughly how much is 50 grams? One bean? More? Less?
              >
              >I have never strained, and it hasn't caused any problems.
              >shalom,
              >Ncoom
              >On Dec 1, 2004, at 8:58 AM, Ruth Baks wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> Making your own vanilla extract is easy, and a great cost saver.
              >>
              >> First of all, I don't recommend using ethanol because it has a very
              >> sharp bite. I prefer to use vodka, because it is neutral and will
              >> not impart any flavor, allowing the vanilla flavor to shine.
              >>
              >> I use 50 gm. of vanilla beans to 1 liter of vodka (45% alc/vol) to
              >> make mine. Check the percentage of alc/vol printed on the bottle;
              >> there are many different strengths offered. (By law, commercially
              >> sold pure vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35% alcohol by
              >> volume.)
              >>
              >> Cut the vanilla beans into small pieces and drop into a bottle of
              >> vodka (pour a little vodka out first, as the vanilla beans will cause
              >> some displacement.) That's it! Now you just have to wait for it to
              >> steep.
              >>
              >> I'll tell you why I cut up the beans, rather than leaving them whole.
              >> The power of the infusion comes from keeping the essential matter (in
              >> this case vanilla, which provides the 'essence') submerged in the
              >> liquid (in this case, vodka.) Vanilla beans are long and thin, and
              >> will stand up vertically in the bottle. If you are making a small
              >> amount (less than a full bottle) the vodka level may not cover all
              >> the beans. Even when using a full bottle of vodka, little by little
              >> this will be poured off as you use the extract, meaning the upper
              >> part of the (uncut) beans will quickly become exposed to the air. The
              >> longer the beans steep totally submerged the stronger the flavor of
              >> the extract. That is why I wrote that I pour off only a small amount
              >> at a time (enough to fill a 100 ml. bottle - less than 4 oz.) and
              >> keep this on my spice shelf for regular use. The remainder I leave in
              >> the vodka bottle to further infuse with flavor. By cutting up the
              >> vanilla beans, the pieces will sink to the bottom of the bottle so
              >> even as I pour off the extract and the vodka level drops, the
              >> remainder continues to infuse as all of the vanilla bean pieces are
              >> submerged, and the extract continues to develop flavor.
              >>
              >> Aside from this, cutting open the seed pods gives greater access
              >> (maximum contact) to the flavor cells. Remember, you will need to
              >> filter the extract if the pods were cut -- the seeds are very tiny
              >> (like ground poppy) so I recommend straining through something very
              >> fine, eg. coffee filter paper.
              >>
              >> Okay, so now it has to steep for a couple of months. It will get
              >> darker and darker over time; strain before using. I strain and
              >> transfer a small amount into a small bottle for everyday use
              >> (allowing the original batch in the vodka bottle to further intensify
              >> in flavor.)
              >>
              >> Here's the fun part: the same vanilla beans may be reused to make
              >> more essence! When the liter is all used up, I refill the vodka 50%
              >> of the original (using 500 cc or 1/2 liter of vodka) for the second
              >> infusion. When that is used up I may go for a 3rd infusion, using 50%
              >> of the previous (this time 250 cc or 1/4 liter of vodka) -- as long
              >> as the color comes through the flavor will too.
              >>
              >> You really cannot imagine how much flavor these beans contain! I
              > > remember when I first read about doing a 2nd or 3rd infusion (using
              >> the same beans) I was skeptical, thinking that this was stretching
              >> things too far... but when I tried it, I found that it really works!
              >> As long as you see the color come through, the flavor will also be
              >> there. As I explained, I cut the vodka in half for each successive
              >> infusion, compensating for depleted flavor by raising the
              >> concentration factor.
              >>
              >> I have been making all my own vanilla extract for years using this
              >> method with excellent results.
              >>
              >> Commercial vanilla extract is made from the lowest quality vanilla
              >> beans: rejects and broken pieces that cannot be sold in open market.
              >> When making the extract yourself, however, you have control over the
              >> quality of the vanilla beans used.
              >>
              >> Keep in mind to use kosher le'pesach alcohol (vodka) and the vanilla
              >> extract may be used all year round, including on Pesach.
              >>
              >> Good luck!
              >>
              >> Ruth Baks
              >> Jerusalem
              >>
              >>
              >> At 6:41 PM +0000 11/30/04, Leila Barbosa wrote:
              >>> I want to make my own vanilla extract from vanilla beans and ethyl
              >>> alcohol
              >>> (ethanol). However I don't know the procedure. I need to know the
              >>> pitfalls,
              >>> if any, that might make the vanilla flavor less than it could be. If
              >>> you
              >>> know how to do it, please advise me. I will really appreciate your
              >>> advice; I
              >>> can't start without it.
              >>>
              > >> Leila Barbosa ..... lolokolo989@...
              > >
            • Ruth Baks
              I m not certain if scraping increases the flavor, because chopping in small pieces gives plenty of access to the seeds. However, lots of loose seeds floating
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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                I'm not certain if scraping increases the flavor, because chopping in
                small pieces gives plenty of access to the seeds. However, lots of
                loose seeds floating around could make straining more difficult,
                particularly if you plan to recycle the vanilla beans for future
                infusions.

                Ruth Baks
                Jerusalem

                At 9:37 AM +0000 12/1/04, Mirjam Dorn wrote:
                >I've been using Ruth's method since she first posted this here
                >months ago, and it makes wonderful vanilla. 
                >
                >I also scrape the beans before submerging them in the vodka, you get
                >lots of extra vanilla flavor.
                >
                >-- Mirj
              • Ruth Baks
                Also keep in mind that I use a one-liter bottle of vodka to the 50 gm. vanilla. This bottle is 1000 ml, whereas most vodka is sold in the smaller 750 ml
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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                  Also keep in mind that I use a one-liter bottle of vodka to the 50
                  gm. vanilla. This bottle is 1000 ml, whereas most vodka is sold in
                  the smaller 750 ml bottles. Keep the proportions in mind; for a
                  smaller bottle of vodka you would use less vanilla.

                  Ruth Baks
                  Jerusalem

                  At 9:50 AM +0200 12/1/04, ncoom gilbar wrote:
                  >Ruth-
                  >Roughly how much is 50 grams? One bean? More? Less?
                  >
                  >I have never strained, and it hasn't caused any problems.
                  >shalom,
                  >Ncoom
                  >On Dec 1, 2004, at 8:58 AM, Ruth Baks wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Making your own vanilla extract is easy, and a great cost saver.
                  >>
                  >> First of all, I don't recommend using ethanol because it has a very
                  >> sharp bite. I prefer to use vodka, because it is neutral and will
                  >> not impart any flavor, allowing the vanilla flavor to shine.
                  >>
                  >> I use 50 gm. of vanilla beans to 1 liter of vodka (45% alc/vol) to
                  >> make mine. Check the percentage of alc/vol printed on the bottle;
                  >> there are many different strengths offered. (By law, commercially
                  >> sold pure vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35% alcohol by
                  >> volume.)
                  >>
                  >> Cut the vanilla beans into small pieces and drop into a bottle of
                  >> vodka (pour a little vodka out first, as the vanilla beans will cause
                  >> some displacement.) That's it! Now you just have to wait for it to
                  >> steep.
                  >>
                  >> I'll tell you why I cut up the beans, rather than leaving them whole.
                  >> The power of the infusion comes from keeping the essential matter (in
                  >> this case vanilla, which provides the 'essence') submerged in the
                  >> liquid (in this case, vodka.) Vanilla beans are long and thin, and
                  >> will stand up vertically in the bottle. If you are making a small
                  >> amount (less than a full bottle) the vodka level may not cover all
                  >> the beans. Even when using a full bottle of vodka, little by little
                  >> this will be poured off as you use the extract, meaning the upper
                  >> part of the (uncut) beans will quickly become exposed to the air. The
                  >> longer the beans steep totally submerged the stronger the flavor of
                  >> the extract. That is why I wrote that I pour off only a small amount
                  >> at a time (enough to fill a 100 ml. bottle - less than 4 oz.) and
                  >> keep this on my spice shelf for regular use. The remainder I leave in
                  >> the vodka bottle to further infuse with flavor. By cutting up the
                  >> vanilla beans, the pieces will sink to the bottom of the bottle so
                  >> even as I pour off the extract and the vodka level drops, the
                  >> remainder continues to infuse as all of the vanilla bean pieces are
                  >> submerged, and the extract continues to develop flavor.
                  >>
                  >> Aside from this, cutting open the seed pods gives greater access
                  >> (maximum contact) to the flavor cells. Remember, you will need to
                  >> filter the extract if the pods were cut -- the seeds are very tiny
                  >> (like ground poppy) so I recommend straining through something very
                  >> fine, eg. coffee filter paper.
                  >>
                  >> Okay, so now it has to steep for a couple of months. It will get
                  >> darker and darker over time; strain before using. I strain and
                  >> transfer a small amount into a small bottle for everyday use
                  >> (allowing the original batch in the vodka bottle to further intensify
                  >> in flavor.)
                  >>
                  >> Here's the fun part: the same vanilla beans may be reused to make
                  >> more essence! When the liter is all used up, I refill the vodka 50%
                  >> of the original (using 500 cc or 1/2 liter of vodka) for the second
                  >> infusion. When that is used up I may go for a 3rd infusion, using 50%
                  >> of the previous (this time 250 cc or 1/4 liter of vodka) -- as long
                  >> as the color comes through the flavor will too.
                  >>
                  >> You really cannot imagine how much flavor these beans contain! I
                  >> remember when I first read about doing a 2nd or 3rd infusion (using
                  >> the same beans) I was skeptical, thinking that this was stretching
                  >> things too far... but when I tried it, I found that it really works!
                  >> As long as you see the color come through, the flavor will also be
                  >> there. As I explained, I cut the vodka in half for each successive
                  >> infusion, compensating for depleted flavor by raising the
                  > > concentration factor.
                  >>
                  >> I have been making all my own vanilla extract for years using this
                  >> method with excellent results.
                  >>
                  >> Commercial vanilla extract is made from the lowest quality vanilla
                  >> beans: rejects and broken pieces that cannot be sold in open market.
                  >> When making the extract yourself, however, you have control over the
                  >> quality of the vanilla beans used.
                  >>
                  >> Keep in mind to use kosher le'pesach alcohol (vodka) and the vanilla
                  >> extract may be used all year round, including on Pesach.
                  >>
                  >> Good luck!
                  >>
                  >> Ruth Baks
                  >> Jerusalem
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> At 6:41 PM +0000 11/30/04, Leila Barbosa wrote:
                  >>> I want to make my own vanilla extract from vanilla beans and ethyl
                  >>> alcohol
                  >>> (ethanol). However I don't know the procedure. I need to know the
                  >>> pitfalls,
                  >>> if any, that might make the vanilla flavor less than it could be. If
                  >>> you
                  >>> know how to do it, please advise me. I will really appreciate your
                  >>> advice; I
                  >>> can't start without it.
                  >>>
                  > >> Leila Barbosa ..... lolokolo989@...
                  > >
                • Ruth Baks
                  I just checked my notes. For large vanilla beans (extra long) you might get 6-7 for 50 gm. For the small variety, it could be 9-11. Weigh them. If vanilla
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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                    I just checked my notes. For large vanilla beans (extra long) you
                    might get 6-7 for 50 gm. For the small variety, it could be 9-11.
                    Weigh them.

                    If vanilla beans are very pricey and you don't want to spend that
                    much, resist the temptation of using fewer vanilla beans. (Don't
                    sacrifice quality for quantity!) Instead, use less vodka and make a
                    smaller quantity of extract, requiring fewer beans. Remember, you
                    can re-use the same beans for further infusions.

                    Ruth Baks
                    Jerusalem


                    At 9:50 AM +0200 12/1/04, ncoom gilbar wrote:
                    >Ruth-
                    >Roughly how much is 50 grams? One bean? More? Less?
                    >
                    >I have never strained, and it hasn't caused any problems.
                    >shalom,
                    >Ncoom
                    >On Dec 1, 2004, at 8:58 AM, Ruth Baks wrote:
                    >
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Making your own vanilla extract is easy, and a great cost saver.
                    >>
                    >> First of all, I don't recommend using ethanol because it has a very
                    >> sharp bite. I prefer to use vodka, because it is neutral and will
                    >> not impart any flavor, allowing the vanilla flavor to shine.
                    >>
                    >> I use 50 gm. of vanilla beans to 1 liter of vodka (45% alc/vol) to
                    >> make mine. Check the percentage of alc/vol printed on the bottle;
                    >> there are many different strengths offered. (By law, commercially
                    >> sold pure vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35% alcohol by
                    >> volume.)
                    >>
                    >> Cut the vanilla beans into small pieces and drop into a bottle of
                    >> vodka (pour a little vodka out first, as the vanilla beans will cause
                    >> some displacement.) That's it! Now you just have to wait for it to
                    >> steep.
                    >>
                    >> I'll tell you why I cut up the beans, rather than leaving them whole.
                    >> The power of the infusion comes from keeping the essential matter (in
                    >> this case vanilla, which provides the 'essence') submerged in the
                    >> liquid (in this case, vodka.) Vanilla beans are long and thin, and
                    >> will stand up vertically in the bottle. If you are making a small
                    >> amount (less than a full bottle) the vodka level may not cover all
                    >> the beans. Even when using a full bottle of vodka, little by little
                    >> this will be poured off as you use the extract, meaning the upper
                    >> part of the (uncut) beans will quickly become exposed to the air. The
                    >> longer the beans steep totally submerged the stronger the flavor of
                    >> the extract. That is why I wrote that I pour off only a small amount
                    >> at a time (enough to fill a 100 ml. bottle - less than 4 oz.) and
                    >> keep this on my spice shelf for regular use. The remainder I leave in
                    >> the vodka bottle to further infuse with flavor. By cutting up the
                    >> vanilla beans, the pieces will sink to the bottom of the bottle so
                    >> even as I pour off the extract and the vodka level drops, the
                    >> remainder continues to infuse as all of the vanilla bean pieces are
                    >> submerged, and the extract continues to develop flavor.
                    >>
                    >> Aside from this, cutting open the seed pods gives greater access
                    >> (maximum contact) to the flavor cells. Remember, you will need to
                    >> filter the extract if the pods were cut -- the seeds are very tiny
                    >> (like ground poppy) so I recommend straining through something very
                    >> fine, eg. coffee filter paper.
                    >>
                    >> Okay, so now it has to steep for a couple of months. It will get
                    >> darker and darker over time; strain before using. I strain and
                    >> transfer a small amount into a small bottle for everyday use
                    >> (allowing the original batch in the vodka bottle to further intensify
                    >> in flavor.)
                    >>
                    >> Here's the fun part: the same vanilla beans may be reused to make
                    >> more essence! When the liter is all used up, I refill the vodka 50%
                    >> of the original (using 500 cc or 1/2 liter of vodka) for the second
                    >> infusion. When that is used up I may go for a 3rd infusion, using 50%
                    >> of the previous (this time 250 cc or 1/4 liter of vodka) -- as long
                    >> as the color comes through the flavor will too.
                    >>
                    >> You really cannot imagine how much flavor these beans contain! I
                    >> remember when I first read about doing a 2nd or 3rd infusion (using
                    >> the same beans) I was skeptical, thinking that this was stretching
                    >> things too far... but when I tried it, I found that it really works!
                    > > As long as you see the color come through, the flavor will also be
                    >> there. As I explained, I cut the vodka in half for each successive
                    >> infusion, compensating for depleted flavor by raising the
                    >> concentration factor.
                    >>
                    >> I have been making all my own vanilla extract for years using this
                    >> method with excellent results.
                    >>
                    >> Commercial vanilla extract is made from the lowest quality vanilla
                    >> beans: rejects and broken pieces that cannot be sold in open market.
                    >> When making the extract yourself, however, you have control over the
                    >> quality of the vanilla beans used.
                    >>
                    >> Keep in mind to use kosher le'pesach alcohol (vodka) and the vanilla
                    >> extract may be used all year round, including on Pesach.
                    >>
                    >> Good luck!
                    >>
                    >> Ruth Baks
                    >> Jerusalem
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> At 6:41 PM +0000 11/30/04, Leila Barbosa wrote:
                    >>> I want to make my own vanilla extract from vanilla beans and ethyl
                    >>> alcohol
                    >>> (ethanol). However I don't know the procedure. I need to know the
                    >>> pitfalls,
                    >>> if any, that might make the vanilla flavor less than it could be. If
                    >>> you
                    >>> know how to do it, please advise me. I will really appreciate your
                    >>> advice; I
                    >>> can't start without it.
                    >>>
                    > >> Leila Barbosa ..... lolokolo989@...
                    > >
                  • ncoom gilbar
                    I ve been doing this with MUCH less bean than you. One big bean per bottle. Color I get, which I presume means I m getting a good vanilla. No complaints about
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
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                      I've been doing this with MUCH less bean than you.

                      One big bean per bottle. Color I get, which I presume means I'm getting
                      a good vanilla. No complaints about the taste. Is it possible you don't
                      need as much as you've been using? (I never recycled them, on the other
                      hand)
                      shalom,
                      Ncoom
                      On Dec 1, 2004, at 5:10 PM, Ruth Baks wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > I just checked my notes. For large vanilla beans (extra long) you
                      > might get 6-7 for 50 gm. For the small variety, it could be 9-11.
                      > Weigh them.
                      >
                      > If vanilla beans are very pricey and you don't want to spend that
                      > much, resist the temptation of using fewer vanilla beans. (Don't
                      > sacrifice quality for quantity!) Instead, use less vodka and make a
                      > smaller quantity of extract, requiring fewer beans. Remember, you
                      > can re-use the same beans for further infusions.
                      >
                      > Ruth Baks
                      > Jerusalem
                      >
                      >
                      > At 9:50 AM +0200 12/1/04, ncoom gilbar wrote:
                      >> Ruth-
                      >> Roughly how much is 50 grams? One bean? More? Less?
                      >>
                      >> I have never strained, and it hasn't caused any problems.
                      >> shalom,
                      >> Ncoom
                      >> On Dec 1, 2004, at 8:58 AM, Ruth Baks wrote:
                      >>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>> Making your own vanilla extract is easy, and a great cost saver.
                      >>>
                      >>> First of all, I don't recommend using ethanol because it has a very
                      >>> sharp bite. I prefer to use vodka, because it is neutral and will
                      >>> not impart any flavor, allowing the vanilla flavor to shine.
                      >>>
                      >>> I use 50 gm. of vanilla beans to 1 liter of vodka (45% alc/vol) to
                      >>> make mine. Check the percentage of alc/vol printed on the bottle;
                      >>> there are many different strengths offered. (By law, commercially
                      >>> sold pure vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35% alcohol by
                      >>> volume.)
                      >>>
                      >>> Cut the vanilla beans into small pieces and drop into a bottle of
                      >>> vodka (pour a little vodka out first, as the vanilla beans will
                      >>> cause
                      >>> some displacement.) That's it! Now you just have to wait for it to
                      >>> steep.
                      >>>
                      >>> I'll tell you why I cut up the beans, rather than leaving them
                      >>> whole.
                      >>> The power of the infusion comes from keeping the essential matter
                      >>> (in
                      >>> this case vanilla, which provides the 'essence') submerged in the
                      >>> liquid (in this case, vodka.) Vanilla beans are long and thin, and
                      >>> will stand up vertically in the bottle. If you are making a small
                      >>> amount (less than a full bottle) the vodka level may not cover all
                      >>> the beans. Even when using a full bottle of vodka, little by little
                      >>> this will be poured off as you use the extract, meaning the upper
                      >>> part of the (uncut) beans will quickly become exposed to the air.
                      >>> The
                      >>> longer the beans steep totally submerged the stronger the flavor of
                      >>> the extract. That is why I wrote that I pour off only a small amount
                      >>> at a time (enough to fill a 100 ml. bottle - less than 4 oz.) and
                      >>> keep this on my spice shelf for regular use. The remainder I leave
                      >>> in
                      >>> the vodka bottle to further infuse with flavor. By cutting up the
                      >>> vanilla beans, the pieces will sink to the bottom of the bottle so
                      >>> even as I pour off the extract and the vodka level drops, the
                      >>> remainder continues to infuse as all of the vanilla bean pieces are
                      >>> submerged, and the extract continues to develop flavor.
                      >>>
                      >>> Aside from this, cutting open the seed pods gives greater access
                      >>> (maximum contact) to the flavor cells. Remember, you will need to
                      >>> filter the extract if the pods were cut -- the seeds are very tiny
                      >>> (like ground poppy) so I recommend straining through something very
                      >>> fine, eg. coffee filter paper.
                      >>>
                      >>> Okay, so now it has to steep for a couple of months. It will get
                      >>> darker and darker over time; strain before using. I strain and
                      >>> transfer a small amount into a small bottle for everyday use
                      >>> (allowing the original batch in the vodka bottle to further
                      >>> intensify
                      >>> in flavor.)
                      >>>
                      >>> Here's the fun part: the same vanilla beans may be reused to make
                      >>> more essence! When the liter is all used up, I refill the vodka 50%
                      >>> of the original (using 500 cc or 1/2 liter of vodka) for the second
                      >>> infusion. When that is used up I may go for a 3rd infusion, using
                      >>> 50%
                      >>> of the previous (this time 250 cc or 1/4 liter of vodka) -- as long
                      >>> as the color comes through the flavor will too.
                      >>>
                      >>> You really cannot imagine how much flavor these beans contain! I
                      >>> remember when I first read about doing a 2nd or 3rd infusion (using
                      >>> the same beans) I was skeptical, thinking that this was stretching
                      >>> things too far... but when I tried it, I found that it really works!
                      >>> As long as you see the color come through, the flavor will also be
                      >>> there. As I explained, I cut the vodka in half for each successive
                      >>> infusion, compensating for depleted flavor by raising the
                      >>> concentration factor.
                      >>>
                      >>> I have been making all my own vanilla extract for years using this
                      >>> method with excellent results.
                      >>>
                      >>> Commercial vanilla extract is made from the lowest quality vanilla
                      >>> beans: rejects and broken pieces that cannot be sold in open market.
                      >>> When making the extract yourself, however, you have control over the
                      >>> quality of the vanilla beans used.
                      >>>
                      >>> Keep in mind to use kosher le'pesach alcohol (vodka) and the vanilla
                      >>> extract may be used all year round, including on Pesach.
                      >>>
                      >>> Good luck!
                      >>>
                      >>> Ruth Baks
                      >>> Jerusalem
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>> At 6:41 PM +0000 11/30/04, Leila Barbosa wrote:
                      >>>> I want to make my own vanilla extract from vanilla beans and ethyl
                      >>>> alcohol
                      >>>> (ethanol). However I don't know the procedure. I need to know the
                      >>>> pitfalls,
                      >>>> if any, that might make the vanilla flavor less than it could be.
                      >>>> If
                      >>>> you
                      >>>> know how to do it, please advise me. I will really appreciate your
                      >>>> advice; I
                      >>>> can't start without it.
                      >>>>
                      >>>> Leila Barbosa ..... lolokolo989@...
                      >>>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      §§§§ §§§§
                      ~~~~~~
                      ncoom@...
                      Gilbars at Large http://www.shilo.org.il/gilbar/
                      Shilo http://www.shilo.org.il
                    • Ruth Baks
                      Before I started making it, I did research to learn as much as I could and get a feel for industry standards. There is a range, and my concentration is nowhere
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 1, 2004
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Before I started making it, I did research to learn as much as I
                        could and get a feel for industry standards. There is a range, and my
                        concentration is nowhere near the top. However, I am pleased with
                        this concentration, and perhaps I've become accustomed to it. Kinda
                        like a cup of coffee, some swear by a particular bean and roast and
                        fresh grind, while others are quite content with instant; in between
                        there is a broad range of preferences. It's a matter of personal
                        taste. If you are satisfied with the results you achieve, stick with
                        it. As the adage goes, 'Don't fix it if it ain't broke.'

                        Ruth Baks
                        Jerusalem
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