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Re: grill question

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  • Fredi Siskind Engelberg
    It s actually an easy way to clean off the dirty grill before you start cooking! Sent from my iPad
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 15, 2013
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      It's actually an easy way to clean off the dirty grill before you start cooking!

      Sent from my iPad
    • Donna Moncharsh
      FWIW - any cigar skin including those marked spring rolls can be cut in strips and fried for the equivalent of crunchy chinese noodles and the results are
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 16, 2013
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        FWIW - any cigar skin including those marked spring rolls can be cut in strips and fried for the equivalent of "crunchy chinese noodles" and the results are quite similar to fried wonton skin strips.

        Also, my instincts tell me that the "spring roll skins" written in English are plain old cigar skins relabled for those unfamiliar with cigar skins.

        and last but not least, having made "vegan" pasta last week, the results are quite similar to traditional wonton skins - I rolled on atlas pasta machine to "4" - would go to "5" for wontons  and possibly "6" for eggrolls.

        The recipe below calls for oil- I will cut in half next time .  ( Recipe from 1000 vegan recipes)


        Egg-Free Pasta Dough

        Makes about 1 pound

        This is an all-purpose pasta dough that can be used to make the ravioli and tortellini recipes  or other handmade pasta shapes such as farfalle and papardelle. You can also crank this dough through a pasta maker to make your own linguine and fettuccine. The olive oil gives the dough a rich texture and flavor.

        2 cups all-purpose flour

        1 teaspoon salt

        2 tablespoons olive oil

        1⁄2 to ¾ cup hot water

        1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and salt. Make a well in the center and add the olive oil. Pour in 1⁄2 cup of the water and, stirring with a fork, gradually incorporate the flour into the liquid. Add additional water if needed to make a stiff dough.

        2. When the dough is pliable, and not sticky, knead it on a lightly floured work surface until smooth, 2 to 3 minutes. If the dough is sticky, sprinkle it with a small amount of flour. Shape the dough into a disk and wrap it in plastic wrap and let it rest unrefrigerated for 15 minutes. The dough is now ready to roll out and cut per recipe instructions.

        Food Processor Variation

        To save time, you can make this dough in the food processor instead of by hand. Place the flour and salt in the food processor and pulse to distribute evenly. With machine running, add the oil and then the water in a slow steady stream until incorporated. The dough should form into a ball. If the dough is too sticky, add more flour a tablespoon at a time and pulse until dough holds together. Remove dough from machine, knead for about 5 minutes, then cover and rest unrefrigerated for 15 minutes before rolling out.


        Fresh Pasta Shapes

        The Egg-Free Pasta Dough (see left) can be used to make the tortellini and ravioli recipes in this book. It can also be used to make a variety of other fresh pasta shapes, even without benefit of an extrusion machine or other equipment. Some examples of hand-crafted fresh pasta include:
        fusilli—Shape fusilli by winding cut pasta strips around a floured thin wooden dowel or knitting needle—just slide them off the stick and let them dry.
        maltagliati—Even if you think you're all thumbs, you can make pasta: maltagliati, which means "badly cut," is made by cutting uneven and lopsided triangles from the rolled-out dough.
        farfalle—Known as butterflies or bow-ties, farfalle are surprisingly simple to shape: cut pasta into 11⁄4 x 21⁄2-inch rectangles, then pinch together in middle and let dry.
        fazzoletti—To make these elegant herb-pressed pasta squares ("handkerchiefs"), simply lay leaves of soft herbs between two very thin strips of rolled-out fresh pasta dough and then roll out again to sandwich the herbs between the pasta sheets.




        On 07/11/2013 11:26 AM, Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
         

         
        Chinese ones are sold uncooked and are square. They can be rolled into
        egg rolls and fried, cut into small squares and used as wonton wrappers
        or sliced into strips and fried to make chow mein.

        I have also seen them cut into larger pieces, fried and served as the
        Chinese equivalent of beignets or fried taco pieces, served with a
        savory sauce.

        Which one did you see?

         
      • Geoffrey S. Mendelson
        ... There is a question of what works versus what is supposed to be . Cigar skins, or any flat pasty sheets would probably do, though I assume the ones made
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 17, 2013
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          On 7/17/2013 8:25 AM, Donna Moncharsh wrote:
          > FWIW - any cigar skin including those marked spring rolls can be cut in
          > strips and fried for the equivalent of "crunchy chinese noodles" and the
          > results are quite similar to fried wonton skin strips.
          >
          > Also, my instincts tell me that the "spring roll skins" written in
          > English are plain old cigar skins relabled for those unfamiliar with
          > cigar skins.
          >

          There is a question of what works versus what is "supposed to be".

          Cigar skins, or any flat pasty sheets would probably do, though I assume
          the ones made with lots of butter or margarine would not.

          The wonton/egg roll/chow mein noodles (all variants of the same dough) I
          used to buy in Philadelphia's Chinatown were very different than what I
          have seen here.

          I doubt that when they are cooked they make much of a difference, but
          the spring roll skins (crepes) and cigar wrappers are really too thin to
          make a proper egg roll.

          Of course these days, I use a different filling (cooked vegetables with
          the liquid squeezed out) and only put enough oil on the baking pan to
          keep them from sticking to the aluminum foil lining the pan.

          In the old days, they were filled with cooked meat and uncooked
          vegetables, and at school cooked in a deep fryer, at home in a wok full
          of oil.

          BTW, they are called egg rolls, because when they were rolled, they are
          sealed with beaten egg, there was no egg in either the filling nor the
          dough.

          The proper size for a spring roll is about the size of a canned stuffed
          grape leaf (relatively small) the huge egg rolls that have become known
          as Chinese food are an American invention.

          Geoff.


          --
          Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379
        • Rachel Stern
          I actually make spring rolls and I use ôrice paperö. You soak them for a minute or a few and they get soft and semi transparent. Then you put fresh
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 17, 2013
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            I actually make spring rolls and I use “rice paper”.  You soak them for a minute or a few and they get soft and semi transparent.  Then you put fresh fillings on them, roll up, seal, refrigerate and serve – cold with a dipping sauce, I favor peanut...

             

             

             

            Rachel Stern

             

            E:  mailto:rsusselj18@...

            H:  08.976.3437

            C:  054.341.3509

             

            רחוב התאנה 24

            ת.ד. 1794

            חשמונאים 73127

             

            Baltimore/Teaneck > Hashmonaim

            August 2011

             

            From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Geoffrey S. Mendelson
            Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 2:12 PM
            To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [israel-food] Egg roll wrappers +recipe

             

             

            On 7/17/2013 8:25 AM, Donna Moncharsh wrote:

            > FWIW - any cigar skin including those marked spring rolls can be cut in
            > strips and fried for the equivalent of "crunchy chinese noodles" and the
            > results are quite similar to fried wonton skin strips.
            >
            > Also, my instincts tell me that the "spring roll skins" written in
            > English are plain old cigar skins relabled for those unfamiliar with
            > cigar skins.
            >

            There is a question of what works versus what is "supposed to be".

            Cigar skins, or any flat pasty sheets would probably do, though I assume
            the ones made with lots of butter or margarine would not.

            The wonton/egg roll/chow mein noodles (all variants of the same dough) I
            used to buy in Philadelphia's Chinatown were very different than what I
            have seen here.

            I doubt that when they are cooked they make much of a difference, but
            the spring roll skins (crepes) and cigar wrappers are really too thin to
            make a proper egg roll.

            Of course these days, I use a different filling (cooked vegetables with
            the liquid squeezed out) and only put enough oil on the baking pan to
            keep them from sticking to the aluminum foil lining the pan.

            In the old days, they were filled with cooked meat and uncooked
            vegetables, and at school cooked in a deep fryer, at home in a wok full
            of oil.

            BTW, they are called egg rolls, because when they were rolled, they are
            sealed with beaten egg, there was no egg in either the filling nor the
            dough.

            The proper size for a spring roll is about the size of a canned stuffed
            grape leaf (relatively small) the huge egg rolls that have become known
            as Chinese food are an American invention.

            Geoff.

            --
            Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379

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