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Re: Greek Yogurt?

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  • anniceyg
    In the U.S., you can even get fatfree Greek yogurt, and it is nice and thick. The stuff here has 3% fat, I believe, so I don t buy it. For a very short
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 3, 2012
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      In the U.S., you can even get fatfree Greek yogurt, and it is nice and thick. The stuff here has 3% fat, I believe, so I don't buy it. For a very short period, Supersol (Shufersal, if you prefer) was selling 0% yogurt imported from Greece, but that disappeared, as do many good things here.

      Annice

      --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, "Cara" <cara_bereck@...> wrote:
      >
      > There are also brands here that market it as 'balkan'. Same thick yogurt.
      > Marketing ploy or or not, the yogurt I have had in different part of Greece is much thicker and more flavorful than standard yogurt either here or in the US. What is marketed as 'greek yogurt' comes closer, but most of the yogurt I have had in Greece was produced by small dairies. not commercial operations, which probably makes a difference.
      >
      > I imagine one might get similar results using full-fat milk and draining it.
      > I wonder if the local cultures used differ? I haven't looked into it.
      > Cara
      >
      > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, "April Hardy" <beagle.eyes@> wrote:
      > >
      > > You can strain regular yogurt through a cheese cloth to get out the water
      > > but that won't make it less sour.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On
      > > Behalf Of Karen Eisenberg
      > > Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2012 9:08 AM
      > > To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: Re: [israel-food] Greek Yogurt?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I saw it in Rami Levy and I think the technical term is 'Greek yogurt.'
      > >
      > > Karen
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On Dec 2, 2012, at 17:17, "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"
      > > <geoffreymendelson@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I'm looking for the yogurt one uses to make tzadiki sauce.
      > >
      > > It is different from regular yogurt in that it is much less sour, and
      > > the water is removed making it the consistency of sour cream.
      > >
      > > It picked up the name "greek yogurt" in the US because of a marketing
      > > campaign to lock customers into buying it from one producer.
      > >
      > > It's very common here as in all of the region, I've had it, in fact once
      > > it was sold to me instead of cream cheese. The problem is I don't
      > > remember the Hebrew name.
      > >
      > > Any suggestions?
      > >
      > > Thanks in advance,
      > >
      > > Geoff.
      > > --
      > > Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379
      > > "Owning a smartphone: Technology's equivalent to learning to play
      > > chopsticks on the piano as a child and thinking you're a musician."
      > > (sent to me by a friend)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > No virus found in this message.
      > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
      > > Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2634/5431 - Release Date: 12/01/12
      > >
      >
    • fredibooks@yahoo.com
      gad Greek yogurt. It comes in a glass jar with a blue lid. it is delicious,consistency of sour cream but a bit tarter. Sent from my iPad
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 3, 2012
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        gad Greek yogurt. It comes in a glass jar with a blue lid. it is delicious,consistency of sour cream but a bit tarter.

        Sent from my iPad
      • Mirjam Weiss
        The Greek yogurt I ve seen with the Yoplait brand is 7% fat! Mirj Sent from my BlackBerry® smartphone from Pelephone ... From: anniceyg
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 5, 2012
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          The Greek yogurt I've seen with the Yoplait brand is 7% fat!

          Mirj
          Sent from my BlackBerry® smartphone from Pelephone

          From: "anniceyg" <annice@...>
          Sender: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2012 13:02:23 -0000
          To: <israel-food@yahoogroups.com>
          ReplyTo: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [israel-food] Re: Greek Yogurt?

           

          In the U.S., you can even get fatfree Greek yogurt, and it is nice and thick. The stuff here has 3% fat, I believe, so I don't buy it. For a very short period, Supersol (Shufersal, if you prefer) was selling 0% yogurt imported from Greece, but that disappeared, as do many good things here.

          Annice

          --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, "Cara" <cara_bereck@...> wrote:
          >
          > There are also brands here that market it as 'balkan'. Same thick yogurt.
          > Marketing ploy or or not, the yogurt I have had in different part of Greece is much thicker and more flavorful than standard yogurt either here or in the US. What is marketed as 'greek yogurt' comes closer, but most of the yogurt I have had in Greece was produced by small dairies. not commercial operations, which probably makes a difference.
          >
          > I imagine one might get similar results using full-fat milk and draining it.
          > I wonder if the local cultures used differ? I haven't looked into it.
          > Cara
          >
          > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, "April Hardy" <beagle.eyes@> wrote:
          > >
          > > You can strain regular yogurt through a cheese cloth to get out the water
          > > but that won't make it less sour.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On
          > > Behalf Of Karen Eisenberg
          > > Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2012 9:08 AM
          > > To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: Re: [israel-food] Greek Yogurt?
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I saw it in Rami Levy and I think the technical term is 'Greek yogurt.'
          > >
          > > Karen
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > On Dec 2, 2012, at 17:17, "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"
          > > <geoffreymendelson@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I'm looking for the yogurt one uses to make tzadiki sauce.
          > >
          > > It is different from regular yogurt in that it is much less sour, and
          > > the water is removed making it the consistency of sour cream.
          > >
          > > It picked up the name "greek yogurt" in the US because of a marketing
          > > campaign to lock customers into buying it from one producer.
          > >
          > > It's very common here as in all of the region, I've had it, in fact once
          > > it was sold to me instead of cream cheese. The problem is I don't
          > > remember the Hebrew name.
          > >
          > > Any suggestions?
          > >
          > > Thanks in advance,
          > >
          > > Geoff.
          > > --
          > > Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM/KBUH7245/KBUW5379
          > > "Owning a smartphone: Technology's equivalent to learning to play
          > > chopsticks on the piano as a child and thinking you're a musician."
          > > (sent to me by a friend)
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > No virus found in this message.
          > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          > > Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2634/5431 - Release Date: 12/01/12
          > >
          >

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