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Re: [israel-food] Re: Cheesecake question

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  • geoffrey mendelson
    ... Potassium Sobate for anyone interested. Geoff. -- Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM Making your enemy reliant on software you support is the best
    Message 1 of 22 , May 31, 2011
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      On Jun 1, 2011, at 9:06 AM, Cara wrote:

      > E-202

      Potassium Sobate for anyone interested.

      Geoff.

      --
      Geoffrey S. Mendelson, N3OWJ/4X1GM
      Making your enemy reliant on software you support is the best revenge.
    • ncoom@shilo.org.il
      ?? I think they re the same thing. Sour cream, in Hebrew shamenet , the higher the fat content, the better your cheese. But what else is new? shalom, ncoom
      Message 2 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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        ??
        I think they're the same thing. Sour cream, in Hebrew 'shamenet', the
        higher the fat content, the better your cheese. But what else is new?

        shalom,
        ncoom

        > Do you mean regular shamenet, or sour cream?
        > Cara
        >
        > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, ncoom <ncoom@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Simple. Get shamenet (preferably 'shel paam'), but it in a cheesecloth
        >> (try a cloth diaper) for several hours and let it hang. Options are to
        >> mix in a little salt or seasonings before you hang. Voila- a good
        >> creamcheese, without going to the bank.
        >>
        >> shalom,
        >> ncoom
        >>
        >> ncoom@...
        >> We're all here because we're not all there
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> On May 31, 2011, at 1:32 PM, rdteitler wrote:
        >>
        >> > Can I substitute the Napoleon cream cheese (e.g. the 30+% fat, in the
        >> tub) for American cream cheese in cheesecake recipes?
        >> >
        >> > If not, please send TNT cheesecake recipes using it my way as I can't
        >> bring myself to spend nearly 80 NS on cream cheese in order to make my
        >> usual recipe.
        >> >
        >> > TIA and Chag sameach,
        >> >
        >> > Rachel
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> > ------------------------------------
        >> >
        >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Cara
        Shamenet is sweet cream, Shamenet Chamutza is sour cream--so sour cream. Thanks for the tip, will definitely try this!
        Message 3 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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          Shamenet is sweet cream, Shamenet Chamutza is sour cream--so sour cream.
          Thanks for the tip, will definitely try this!

          --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, ncoom@... wrote:
          >
          > ??
          > I think they're the same thing. Sour cream, in Hebrew 'shamenet', the
          > higher the fat content, the better your cheese. But what else is new?
          >
          > shalom,
          > ncoom
          >
          > > Do you mean regular shamenet, or sour cream?
          > > Cara
          > >
          > > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, ncoom <ncoom@> wrote:
          > >>
          > >> Simple. Get shamenet (preferably 'shel paam'), but it in a cheesecloth
          > >> (try a cloth diaper) for several hours and let it hang. Options are to
          > >> mix in a little salt or seasonings before you hang. Voila- a good
          > >> creamcheese, without going to the bank.
          > >>
          > >> shalom,
          > >> ncoom
          > >>
          > >> ncoom@
          > >> We're all here because we're not all there
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >>
          > >> On May 31, 2011, at 1:32 PM, rdteitler wrote:
          > >>
          > >> > Can I substitute the Napoleon cream cheese (e.g. the 30+% fat, in the
          > >> tub) for American cream cheese in cheesecake recipes?
          > >> >
          > >> > If not, please send TNT cheesecake recipes using it my way as I can't
          > >> bring myself to spend nearly 80 NS on cream cheese in order to make my
          > >> usual recipe.
          > >> >
          > >> > TIA and Chag sameach,
          > >> >
          > >> > Rachel
          > >> >
          > >> >
          > >> >
          > >> > ------------------------------------
          > >> >
          > >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >> >
          > >> >
          > >> >
          > >>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Bari Nirenberg
          No, there s shamenet metuka (sweet cream) and shamenet , also called shamenet hamutza (sour cream). Definitely not the same thing. Shamenet metuka is
          Message 4 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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            No, there's "shamenet metuka" (sweet cream) and "shamenet", also called "shamenet hamutza" (sour cream).  Definitely not the same thing. "Shamenet metuka" is often called just "shamenet", as well (especially when someone wants to know if there's cream in a soup, for example).  Like Cara, I had no idea which one being referred to.

            In general, I find it more helpful when things are called by their names in English -- it's much clearer and I can do the translation to Hebrew on my own.

            Bari

            On Wed, Jun 1, 2011 at 10:21, <ncoom@...> wrote:
             

            ??
            I think they're the same thing. Sour cream, in Hebrew 'shamenet', the
            higher the fat content, the better your cheese. But what else is new?

            shalom,
            ncoom



            > Do you mean regular shamenet, or sour cream?
            > Cara
            >
            > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, ncoom <ncoom@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> Simple. Get shamenet (preferably 'shel paam'), but it in a cheesecloth
            >> (try a cloth diaper) for several hours and let it hang. Options are to
            >> mix in a little salt or seasonings before you hang. Voila- a good
            >> creamcheese, without going to the bank.
            >>
            >> shalom,
            >> ncoom
            >>
            >> ncoom@...
            >> We're all here because we're not all there
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> On May 31, 2011, at 1:32 PM, rdteitler wrote:
            >>
            >> > Can I substitute the Napoleon cream cheese (e.g. the 30+% fat, in the
            >> tub) for American cream cheese in cheesecake recipes?
            >> >
            >> > If not, please send TNT cheesecake recipes using it my way as I can't
            >> bring myself to spend nearly 80 NS on cream cheese in order to make my
            >> usual recipe.
            >> >
            >> > TIA and Chag sameach,
            >> >
            >> > Rachel
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >> > ------------------------------------
            >> >
            >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >

          • Shira Cheryl
            I shall try to drain 4 containers of 15% sour cream overnight in the fridge.  My grandkids go through a package of the Whipped Philly Creamcheese every
            Message 5 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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              I shall try to drain 4 containers of 15% sour cream overnight in the fridge.  My grandkids go through a package of the Whipped Philly Creamcheese every Saturday breakfast with my Montreal Bagels. But today it costs over 20 NIS a container....I'll tell you what I think of the 'Dripped' stuff
               
              BTW, I just received via Ebay 5 quarts of REAL Maple Syrup.  This should keep us going for a while. With shipping it cost $115 and there was no problem with customs.  Came through, no problem.
               
              -Shira

              From: Bari Nirenberg <bnirenberg@...>
              To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2011 12:11:44 PM
              Subject: Re: [israel-food] Re: Cheesecake question

               
              No, there's "shamenet metuka" (sweet cream) and "shamenet", also called "shamenet hamutza" (sour cream).  Definitely not the same thing. "Shamenet metuka" is often called just "shamenet", as well (especially when someone wants to know if there's cream in a soup, for example).  Like Cara, I had no idea which one being referred to.

              In general, I find it more helpful when things are called by their names in English -- it's much clearer and I can do the translation to Hebrew on my own.

              Bari

              On Wed, Jun 1, 2011 at 10:21, <ncoom@...> wrote:
               
              ??
              I think they're the same thing. Sour cream, in Hebrew 'shamenet', the
              higher the fat content, the better your cheese. But what else is new?

              shalom,
              ncoom


              > Do you mean regular shamenet, or sour cream?
              > Cara
              >
              > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, ncoom <ncoom@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> Simple. Get shamenet (preferably 'shel paam'), but it in a cheesecloth
              >> (try a cloth diaper) for several hours and let it hang. Options are to
              >> mix in a little salt or seasonings before you hang. Voila- a good
              >> creamcheese, without going to the bank.
              >>
              >> shalom,
              >> ncoom
              >>
              >> ncoom@...
              >> We're all here because we're not all there
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> On May 31, 2011, at 1:32 PM, rdteitler wrote:
              >>
              >> > Can I substitute the Napoleon cream cheese (e.g. the 30+% fat, in the
              >> tub) for American cream cheese in cheesecake recipes?
              >> >
              >> > If not, please send TNT cheesecake recipes using it my way as I can't
              >> bring myself to spend nearly 80 NS on cream cheese in order to make my
              >> usual recipe.
              >> >
              >> > TIA and Chag sameach,
              >> >
              >> > Rachel
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > ------------------------------------
              >> >
              >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >



            • Ruth Baks
              I ve made cheesecake here using the various options: Philadelphia, Napolean, Gevina Levana. In the end I prefer to simply make my own: it costs less, is full
              Message 6 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                [israel-food] Re: Cheesecake question
                I've made cheesecake here using the various options: Philadelphia, Napolean, Gevina Levana.  In the end I prefer to simply make my own: it costs less, is full of flavor, and you're not paying for chemicals or 'air'.

                I use the high-fat 'shamenet shel paam'. (Note: the "Original" is high-fat, the newer version is lower; I use the "Original".)

                Sour cream easily transforms into cream cheese: simply wrap the sour cream in cheesecloth (or in bridal veil netting, or even in a mesh laundry bag) and hang above the sink to drip overnight. (I don't add salt.) In the morning gently squeeze out any remaining drops of water.  That's it!  Voila!  Marvelous cream cheese, and free of additives.  Chill in refrigerator until needed.  (It will firm further during chilling.) 

                Note: after the water drips out there will be a reduction of weight in the final product, so you need to plan ahead.  800 gm. (28.2 oz. or four 200 gm. Israeli containers) of rich sour cream, after draining overnight, produces about 500 gm. (17.6 oz.) of superlative, dense cream cheese.

                Those who use the standard Israel Gevinah Levana (if I'm not mistaken, it's made from milk powder) for cheesecake, will achieve superior results if you pre-drain it to release excess water.  Put the Gevinah Levana into a wire mesh strainer set on a plate or over a bowl and refrigerate overnight.  In the morning you will be amazed at the difference in texture: much firmer.  Because Gevinah Levana is so watery, most Israeli cheesecake recipes include instant pudding, cornstarch or gelatin in order to firm it up.

                Good luck!
                And Happy Yom Yerushalayim!

                Ruth Baks
                Jerusalem

                At 6:06 AM +0000 6/1/11, Cara wrote:
                We recently got Philly in our local store. I compared the label to the local Napoleon--and it kind of bothered me that it isn't made of...cream.

                I imagine that it accounts for the difference in taste and texture.

                From the manufacturers' respective web sites:

                PHILADELPHIA CREAM CHEESE --PASTEURIZED NONFAT MILK AND MILKFAT, CHEESE CULTURE, WHEY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, SALT, STABILIZERS (XANTHAN AND/OR CAROB BEAN AND/OR GUAR GUMS). CONTAINS MILK.

                Napoleon: cream, salt, preservative: E-202     
                Cara
              • ncoom@shilo.org.il
                My experience is if you go into a mekolet and talk shamenet, it s clear you mean sour cream. Sweet cream is the exception and must be asked for as samenet
                Message 7 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                  My experience is if you go into a mekolet and talk 'shamenet,' it's clear
                  you mean sour cream. Sweet cream is the exception and must be asked for as
                  'samenet metuka.'

                  Default term.
                  ncoom


                  > No, there's "shamenet metuka" (sweet cream) and "shamenet", also called
                  > "shamenet hamutza" (sour cream). Definitely not the same thing. "Shamenet
                  > metuka" is often called just "shamenet", as well (especially when someone
                  > wants to know if there's cream in a soup, for example). Like Cara, I had
                  > no
                  > idea which one being referred to.
                  >
                  > In general, I find it more helpful when things are called by their names
                  > in
                  > English -- it's much clearer and I can do the translation to Hebrew on my
                  > own.
                  >
                  > Bari
                  >
                  > On Wed, Jun 1, 2011 at 10:21, <ncoom@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> ??
                  >> I think they're the same thing. Sour cream, in Hebrew 'shamenet', the
                  >> higher the fat content, the better your cheese. But what else is new?
                  >>
                  >> shalom,
                  >> ncoom
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> > Do you mean regular shamenet, or sour cream?
                  >> > Cara
                  >> >
                  >> > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, ncoom <ncoom@...> wrote:
                  >> >>
                  >> >> Simple. Get shamenet (preferably 'shel paam'), but it in a
                  >> cheesecloth
                  >> >> (try a cloth diaper) for several hours and let it hang. Options are
                  >> to
                  >> >> mix in a little salt or seasonings before you hang. Voila- a good
                  >> >> creamcheese, without going to the bank.
                  >> >>
                  >> >> shalom,
                  >> >> ncoom
                  >> >>
                  >> >> ncoom@...
                  >> >> We're all here because we're not all there
                  >> >>
                  >> >>
                  >> >>
                  >> >>
                  >> >>
                  >> >> On May 31, 2011, at 1:32 PM, rdteitler wrote:
                  >> >>
                  >> >> > Can I substitute the Napoleon cream cheese (e.g. the 30+% fat, in
                  >> the
                  >> >> tub) for American cream cheese in cheesecake recipes?
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > If not, please send TNT cheesecake recipes using it my way as I
                  >> can't
                  >> >> bring myself to spend nearly 80 NS on cream cheese in order to make
                  >> my
                  >> >> usual recipe.
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > TIA and Chag sameach,
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Rachel
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > ------------------------------------
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >>
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> > ------------------------------------
                  >> >
                  >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                • Mirjam Weiss
                  I used to make the dripped stuff all the time in the early 80s when cream cheese was not available in Israel. I still make the dripped stuff with yogurt.
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                    I used to make the dripped stuff all the time in the early 80s when cream cheese was not available in Israel.  I still make the dripped stuff with yogurt.  Yogurt cheese is actually yummy and low-fat. 



                    On Wed, Jun 1, 2011 at 12:33 PM, Shira Cheryl <shiracheryl@...> wrote:
                     

                    I shall try to drain 4 containers of 15% sour cream overnight in the fridge.  My grandkids go through a package of the Whipped Philly Creamcheese every Saturday breakfast with my Montreal Bagels. But today it costs over 20 NIS a container....I'll tell you what I think of the 'Dripped' stuff
                     
                    BTW, I just received via Ebay 5 quarts of REAL Maple Syrup.  This should keep us going for a while. With shipping it cost $115 and there was no problem with customs.  Came through, no problem.
                     
                    -Shira

                    From: Bari Nirenberg <bnirenberg@...>
                    To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2011 12:11:44 PM
                    Subject: Re: [israel-food] Re: Cheesecake question

                     
                    No, there's "shamenet metuka" (sweet cream) and "shamenet", also called "shamenet hamutza" (sour cream).  Definitely not the same thing. "Shamenet metuka" is often called just "shamenet", as well (especially when someone wants to know if there's cream in a soup, for example).  Like Cara, I had no idea which one being referred to.

                    In general, I find it more helpful when things are called by their names in English -- it's much clearer and I can do the translation to Hebrew on my own.

                    Bari

                    On Wed, Jun 1, 2011 at 10:21, <ncoom@...> wrote:
                     
                    ??
                    I think they're the same thing. Sour cream, in Hebrew 'shamenet', the
                    higher the fat content, the better your cheese. But what else is new?

                    shalom,
                    ncoom


                    > Do you mean regular shamenet, or sour cream?
                    > Cara
                    >
                    > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, ncoom <ncoom@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> Simple. Get shamenet (preferably 'shel paam'), but it in a cheesecloth
                    >> (try a cloth diaper) for several hours and let it hang. Options are to
                    >> mix in a little salt or seasonings before you hang. Voila- a good
                    >> creamcheese, without going to the bank.
                    >>
                    >> shalom,
                    >> ncoom
                    >>
                    >> ncoom@...
                    >> We're all here because we're not all there
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> On May 31, 2011, at 1:32 PM, rdteitler wrote:
                    >>
                    >> > Can I substitute the Napoleon cream cheese (e.g. the 30+% fat, in the
                    >> tub) for American cream cheese in cheesecake recipes?
                    >> >
                    >> > If not, please send TNT cheesecake recipes using it my way as I can't
                    >> bring myself to spend nearly 80 NS on cream cheese in order to make my
                    >> usual recipe.
                    >> >
                    >> > TIA and Chag sameach,
                    >> >
                    >> > Rachel
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> > ------------------------------------
                    >> >
                    >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >




                  • Ruth Baks
                    Good for you, Mirj! What you are making is labaneh or labneh - a sour tasting cheese made from yogurt, popular throughout the Middle East. Labaneh tastes
                    Message 9 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                      Re: [israel-food] Re: Cheesecake question
                      Good for you, Mirj! 

                      What you are making is 'labaneh' or 'labneh' - a sour tasting 'cheese' made from yogurt, popular throughout the Middle East.  Labaneh tastes more tangy than cream cheese - more acidic - and the texture is different.  It's a true Middle East classic, often enjoyed with fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, olives, hummus and fresh pita!

                      Ruth Baks
                      Jerusalem

                      At 1:40 PM +0300 6/1/11, Mirjam Weiss wrote:
                      I used to make the dripped stuff all the time in the early 80s when cream cheese was not available in Israel. I still make the dripped stuff with yogurt. Yogurt cheese is actually yummy and low-fat.
                      -- Mirj
                      www.miriyummy.wordpress.com
                    • Mirjam Weiss
                      My version doesn t come out as tangy as labaneh, which I love! I love making an Israeli salad, with lots of micro-chopped vegetables, tons of parsley and
                      Message 10 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                        My version doesn't come out as tangy as labaneh, which I love! 

                        I love making an Israeli salad, with lots of micro-chopped vegetables, tons of parsley and coriander chopped in there with them, and then toss in a huge glop of yogurt cheese and lots of black pepper, that's the dressing.  I enjoy it too much for me to even think it's healthy, but it is.

                         




                        On Wed, Jun 1, 2011 at 1:49 PM, Ruth Baks <PosUnltd@...> wrote:
                        Good for you, Mirj! 

                        What you are making is 'labaneh' or 'labneh' - a sour tasting 'cheese' made from yogurt, popular throughout the Middle East.  Labaneh tastes more tangy than cream cheese - more acidic - and the texture is different.  It's a true Middle East classic, often enjoyed with fresh cucumbers, tomatoes, olives, hummus and fresh pita!

                        Ruth Baks
                        Jerusalem

                        At 1:40 PM +0300 6/1/11, Mirjam Weiss wrote:
                        I used to make the dripped stuff all the time in the early 80s when cream cheese was not available in Israel. I still make the dripped stuff with yogurt. Yogurt cheese is actually yummy and low-fat.
                        -- Mirj
                        www.miriyummy.wordpress.com

                      • ncoom@shilo.org.il
                        ... I ask you to please NOT use that last word on a discussion about cheesecake. I m sure it violates SOME principal of this group. hag sameach ncoom
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                          > Yogurt cheese is actually yummy and low-fat.


                          I ask you to please NOT use that last word on a discussion about
                          cheesecake. I'm sure it violates SOME principal of this group.

                          hag sameach
                          ncoom
                        • shirakestenbaum
                          now that you mention it... the caterer who did my son s bar mitsva (12 years ago...) used to make her own cream cheese (by draining shamenet hamutza) for her
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                            now that you mention it... the caterer who did my son's bar mitsva (12 years ago...) used to make her own cream cheese (by draining shamenet hamutza) for her signature cheese cakes. All i can tell you is that the cake was gone within about 20 seconds...

                            Shira

                            --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, Tsipi Amiri <tsipiamiri@...> wrote:
                            >
                            <snip snip>
                            > I think that 4 containers of shamenet yeilds about 2 cups of finished product.
                            > If anyone tried using this type of cream cheese in an American recipe, I'd love to hear about the end result. �I'm chicken and it's going to cost me 30 or more shekels more this year.
                            > HTH
                            > Tsipi Amiri
                            >
                          • alizah hochstead
                            There is also something on the market called Gevanat SHemenet (Tara and someone else) It is cream cheese in a lower fat version Have a Good Summer Acts of
                            Message 13 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                              There is also something on the market called Gevanat SHemenet (Tara and someone else) It is cream cheese in a lower fat version

                              Have a Good Summer
                              Acts of Kindness Will bring MoshiachMenashe and Alizah Hochstead
                              050-54-770-04







                              To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
                              From: bnirenberg@...
                              Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2011 12:11:44 +0300
                              Subject: Re: [israel-food] Re: Cheesecake question




























                              No, there's "shamenet metuka" (sweet cream) and "shamenet", also called "shamenet hamutza" (sour cream). Definitely not the same thing. "Shamenet metuka" is often called just "shamenet", as well (especially when someone wants to know if there's cream in a soup, for example). Like Cara, I had no idea which one being referred to.


                              In general, I find it more helpful when things are called by their names in English -- it's much clearer and I can do the translation to Hebrew on my own.
                              Bari
                            • Tsipi Amiri
                              Did you check the ingredients?  I find all the cheeses like that have a chemical aftertaste.  They are loaded with fillers and chemicals to get them smooth
                              Message 14 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                                Did you check the ingredients?  I find all the cheeses like that have a chemical aftertaste.  They are loaded with fillers and chemicals to get them smooth and "creamy".  What do you think?
                                BTW, I saw the posting on the ingredients in Philly-type cream cheese.  I think there are about 21 ingredients missing.  I once compared it to Napoleon in the store.  Philly had about 27 (exaggerated, of course but you get my point) ingredients and Napoleon had around 5.
                                Tsipi Amiri

                                 --- On Wed, 6/1/11, alizah hochstead <alizahh@...> wrote:

                                From: alizah hochstead <alizahh@...>
                                Subject: RE: [israel-food] Re: Cheesecake question
                                To: "Israel Food List" <israel-food@yahoogroups.com>
                                Date: Wednesday, June 1, 2011, 4:32 PM

                                There is also something on the market called Gevanat SHemenet (Tara and someone else) It is cream cheese in a lower fat version

                                Have a Good Summer
                                Acts of Kindness Will bring MoshiachMenashe and Alizah Hochstead
                                050-54-770-04




                              • Suzie
                                Shira, your recipe for cheesecake looks great - very similar to the one I used to make in the UK - but how does it not come out sloppy? Does the cornstarch you
                                Message 15 of 22 , Jun 1, 2011
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                                  Shira, your recipe for cheesecake looks great - very similar to the one I used to make in the UK - but how does it not come out sloppy?

                                  Does the cornstarch you list firm it up alot? Or should I use some gelatin or vanilla pudding? We really miss a good firm cheesecake.

                                  Do you strain the ski and cream cheese etc in a muslin?

                                  I don't think my husband will cope with the disappointment if it goes SPLAT again.

                                  Thanks,

                                  Suzie in Zichron
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