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RE: [israel-food] Cholent / Hamin

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  • alizah hochstead
    I like cooking mine in the cholent (always an odd number of eggs) as they take on the flavor of the cholent and are very smooth (vs rubbery) Acts of Kindness
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 31, 2010
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      I like cooking mine in the cholent (always an odd number of eggs) as they take on the flavor of the cholent and are very smooth (vs rubbery)


      Acts of Kindness Will bring Moshiach
      Menashe and Alizah Hochstead
      050-54-770-04






       



      To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
      From: sarahm@...
      Date: Fri, 31 Dec 2010 09:09:15 +0200
      Subject: RE: [israel-food] Cholent / Hamin

       
      I mix up a batch of batter for matzo balls -- 2 eggs, a couple of tablespoons of water, a tablespoon or so of oil, teaspoon of salt, matza meal [remember it soaks up liquid so don't make the batter too stiff]. Sometimes I add a bit of black pepper or grated carrot for "zing", and let it stand for about 10 minutes before molding it into a patty and putting in onto the bubbling hamin. It acts as a partial seal, keeping the hamin from drying out on top, although by the next day it has become crusty on top itself.

      I boil the eggs first because I had several "explode" once in my hamin [possibly there were hairline cracks in the shells, and since they wind up half in and half out of the hot liquid, the temperature difference between top and bottom does it.] But if uncooked works for you...

      ~~~~<<< Sarah in Jerusalem >>>~~~~
      A dry sense of humor is better than slobbering everywhere.
      -----Original Message-----
      From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sammy ominsky
      Sent: Thursday, December 30, 2010 10:15 PM
      To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [israel-food] Cholent / Hamin

      This sort of complex, multilayered hamin was one of the evolutionary stages I mentioned earlier. Sarah, yours sounds utterly delicious! I may have to try hita one of these days.

      A "knaidlel" is a matzo ball? Sort of an unspiced version of the kukla I love so?

      When I use kishka, I always take the skin off so it adds to the body of the cholent but the form is lost. Nobody has to know it's in there :)

      Do you always boil the eggs first? I usually put them in raw and don't worry about it. They come out brown and creamy just the same.

      sambo

      On 30/12/2010, at 14:29, Sarah Meir wrote:

      > I too have several sizes of crock pots. I really only make hamin on cold, rainy Shabbatot, as it is so filling, and I think that's the reason most Israelis seem to eat it as a side, rather than main, dish. A little goes a long way!
      >
      > The Meir family hamin is a product of the dual heritage – Yitzhak being Iraqi, and my mother's side was Russian Jewish [with a detour through the Lower East Side.] First I peel and cut up enough potatoes to put at the bottom of the pot, in fairly large hunks. I then put a piece of meat, preferably with a bone and not too lean, on top of that. Then I add about a cup of wheat berries [hita, or "hinta" in Iraqi], which I've toasted in a frying pan, added chopped sautéed onion and lots of garlic, sprinkle about 2 tsp. cumin and some coarsely ground black pepper over everything, add some chicken soup powder and add boiling water to cover. No added salt! On top of that I put a giant knaidel, patted into a pancake shape. I rarely add kishke; not all the family likes it. Sometimes I put several hardboiled eggs [still in their shells] in. By lunch on Shabbat they are brown and creamy inside and the Mizrachim think them a delicacy. When I've got a large company for lunch, I will put a cup of rice into a "cooky bag", piercing it all over so the hamin cooking liquid will get in, and add more water than usual, since the rice will soak up quite a lot. I usually put the crock pot on high until it is bubbling, then cook on low until Shabbat morning. My crock pot cooks "hot", so I have it connected to a timer, which automatically changes to 30 minutes on/30 minutes off from about 6 a.m. Shabbat. This keeps the hamin hot but it doesn't burn until ready to serve [we tend to eat Shabbat lunch a bit late, because we don’t have seudah shlishit] It sounds like a lot of work, but it really takes very little time to put it all together and then it just simmers away on its own.
      >
      > ~~~~<<< Sarah in Jerusalem >>>~~~~
      > A dry sense of humor is better than slobbering everywhere.
      > _____
      >
      > From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Karen eisenberg
      > Sent: Thursday, December 30, 2010 5:28 PM
      > To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [israel-food] Cholent / Hamin
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > That looks like a great idea. Might need one.
      >
      > Karen
      >
      > On 30 בדצמ 2010, at 16:26, sammy ominsky <s@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yup, that keeps it from being dry. I don't serve the liquid with the chicken and chick peas, it's not that great as soup, being a thin and slightly bitter broth. If that seems like too much water, maybe cut the chicken to pieces so it stays flatter, and use less water. Another idea might be a rice stuffing inside the whole chicken.
      >
      > I've found that different size crock pots are very handy. No need to use a large pot for a tiny cholent, or a 5l pot for a single chicken. If you only have one, though, something I've done is to put the cholent in a smaller, covered pot that fits inside the crock and put water to surround the inner pot and transfer the heat to it.
      >
      > I recently bought a neat thing, which is three medium-sized crock pots in one unit, like this: <http://www.ecrater.com/p/7618127/crock-pot-slow-cooker-trio> http://www.ecrater.com/p/7618127/crock-pot-slow-cooker-trio
      > Now I can make more than one cholent for times we have lots of guests. Beef in one, lamb in the next and chicken in the third. Or a soup in one and cholent in the other, etc.
      >
      > sambo
      >
      > On 30/12/2010, at 08:50, Mirjam Weiss wrote:
      >
      >> For the chicken recipe you wrote water to cover. Water to cover the WHOLE
      >> chicken?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links


    • Sarah Meir
      Yes to the first question, no to the second. The giant knaidel cooks in the cholent liquid, and so soaks some up. The idea originally came to me from a
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 31, 2010
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        Yes to the first question, no to the second.  The "giant knaidel" cooks in the cholent liquid, and so soaks some up.

         

        The idea originally came to me from a recipe for "Pesach kishke" which was really a loaf made from matzo ball dough to which had been added minced carrots, celery, and black pepper [and rolled in aluminum foil instead of a standard casing].  I figured that if one could make a loaf, then one could make a flat knaidel, like a kugel, to sit on top of the hamin.  Most of the time I don't bother with the veggies, but you can add minced or grated carrots, celery, or shredded cabbage, for added flavor and a different texture.

         

        ~~~~<<< Sarah in Jerusalem

        >>>~~~~
         A dry sense of humor is better than slobbering everywhere.


        From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Karen eisenberg
        Sent: Friday, December 31, 2010 12:28 PM
        To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [israel-food] Cholent / Hamin

         




        So the same ratio of water/oil/Matza meal that you would use for Matza balls?  Do you put less water in the cholent itself, or not?  

        Karen


        On 31 בדצמ 2010, at 09:09, "Sarah Meir" <sarahm@...> wrote:

         

        I mix up a batch of batter for matzo balls -- 2 eggs, a couple of tablespoons of water, a tablespoon or so of oil, teaspoon of salt, matza meal [remember it soaks up liquid so don't make the batter too stiff]. Sometimes I add a bit of black pepper or grated carrot for "zing", and let it stand for about 10 minutes before molding it into a patty and putting in onto the bubbling hamin. It acts as a partial seal, keeping the hamin from drying out on top, although by the next day it has become crusty on top itself.

        I boil the eggs first because I had several "explode" once in my hamin [possibly there were hairline cracks in the shells, and since they wind up half in and half out of the hot liquid, the temperature difference between top and bottom does it.] But if uncooked works for you...

        ~~~~<<< Sarah in Jerusalem >>>~~~~
        A dry sense of humor is better than slobbering everywhere.
        -----Original Message-----
        From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sammy ominsky
        Sent: Thursday, December 30, 2010 10:15 PM
        To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [israel-food] Cholent / Hamin

        This sort of complex, multilayered hamin was one of the evolutionary stages I mentioned earlier. Sarah, yours sounds utterly delicious! I may have to try hita one of these days.

        A "knaidlel" is a matzo ball? Sort of an unspiced version of the kukla I love so?

        When I use kishka, I always take the skin off so it adds to the body of the cholent but the form is lost. Nobody has to know it's in there :)

        Do you always boil the eggs first? I usually put them in raw and don't worry about it. They come out brown and creamy just the same.

        sambo

        On 30/12/2010, at 14:29, Sarah Meir wrote:

        > I too have several sizes of crock pots. I really only make hamin on cold, rainy Shabbatot, as it is so filling, and I think that's the reason most Israelis seem to eat it as a side, rather than main, dish. A little goes a long way!
        >
        > The Meir family hamin is a product of the dual heritage – Yitzhak being Iraqi, and my mother's side was Russian Jewish [with a detour through the Lower East Side.] First I peel and cut up enough potatoes to put at the bottom of the pot, in fairly large hunks. I then put a piece of meat, preferably with a bone and not too lean, on top of that. Then I add about a cup of wheat berries [hita, or "hinta" in Iraqi], which I've toasted in a frying pan, added chopped sautéed onion and lots of garlic, sprinkle about 2 tsp. cumin and some coarsely ground black pepper over everything, add some chicken soup powder and add boiling water to cover. No added salt! On top of that I put a giant knaidel, patted into a pancake shape. I rarely add kishke; not all the family likes it. Sometimes I put several hardboiled eggs [still in their shells] in. By lunch on Shabbat they are brown and creamy inside and the Mizrachim think them a delicacy. When I've got a large company for lunch, I will put a cup of rice into a "cooky bag", piercing it all over so the hamin cooking liquid will get in, and add more water than usual, since the rice will soak up quite a lot. I usually put the crock pot on high until it is bubbling, then cook on low until Shabbat morning. My crock pot cooks "hot", so I have it connected to a timer, which automatically changes to 30 minutes on/30 minutes off from about 6 a.m. Shabbat. This keeps the hamin hot but it doesn't burn until ready to serve [we tend to eat Shabbat lunch a bit late, because we don’t have seudah shlishit] It sounds like a lot of work, but it really takes very little time to put it all together and then it just simmers away on its own.
        >
        > ~~~~<<< Sarah in Jerusalem >>>~~~~
        > A dry sense of humor is better than slobbering everywhere.
        > _____
        >
        > From: israel-food@yahoogroups.com [mailto:israel-food@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Karen eisenberg
        > Sent: Thursday, December 30, 2010 5:28 PM
        > To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [israel-food] Cholent / Hamin
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > That looks like a great idea. Might need one.
        >
        > Karen
        >
        > On 30 בדצמ 2010, at 16:26, sammy ominsky <s@...> wrote:
        >
        > Yup, that keeps it from being dry. I don't serve the liquid with the chicken and chick peas, it's not that great as soup, being a thin and slightly bitter broth. If that seems like too much water, maybe cut the chicken to pieces so it stays flatter, and use less water. Another idea might be a rice stuffing inside the whole chicken.
        >
        > I've found that different size crock pots are very handy. No need to use a large pot for a tiny cholent, or a 5l pot for a single chicken. If you only have one, though, something I've done is to put the cholent in a smaller, covered pot that fits inside the crock and put water to surround the inner pot and transfer the heat to it.
        >
        > I recently bought a neat thing, which is three medium-sized crock pots in one unit, like this: <http://www.ecrater.com/p/7618127/crock-pot-slow-cooker-trio> http://www.ecrater.com/p/7618127/crock-pot-slow-cooker-trio
        > Now I can make more than one cholent for times we have lots of guests. Beef in one, lamb in the next and chicken in the third. Or a soup in one and cholent in the other, etc.
        >
        > sambo
        >
        > On 30/12/2010, at 08:50, Mirjam Weiss wrote:
        >
        >> For the chicken recipe you wrote water to cover. Water to cover the WHOLE
        >> chicken?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links


      • Karen eisenberg
        Why an odd number of eggs? Karen ... Why an odd number of eggs? Karen On 31 בדצמ 2010, at 14:58, alizah hochstead wrote: I like
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 1, 2011
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          Why an odd number of eggs?

          Karen

          On 31 בדצמ 2010, at 14:58, alizah hochstead <alizahh@...> wrote:

           

          I like cooking mine in the cholent (always an odd number of eggs) as they take on the flavor of the cholent and are very smooth (vs rubbery)


          Acts of Kindness Will bring Moshiach
          Menashe and Alizah Hochstead
          050-54-770-04






           


        • shirakestenbaum
          Good idea: Vegetarian cholent - chickpeas and potatoes: =========================================== Saute one-two finely chopped onions (or grate them if you
          Message 4 of 17 , Jan 2, 2011
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            Good idea:

            Vegetarian cholent - chickpeas and potatoes:
            ===========================================
            Saute one-two finely chopped onions (or grate them if you have some of *those* people in your family who won't eat onions but who claim that *this* cholent - the one with the onions, was much better than last batch - made without onions. go figure). after a few minutes, add one grated sweet potato. after a few minutes more add heaping tablespoon of silan/honey/brown sugar, some hot paprika, garlic. swish around then add water. (i sometimes add the regular potatoes to the sauteeing stage).

            add one med size potatoe per person.

            add 1-2 cups of soaked chickpeas.

            add water to just cover, bring to a boil, lower flame and coo for about one hour before shabbat. add hardboiled eggs (one per person, optional in some homes, obligatory in others). I like to put the eggs in a cooky bag or cloth bag - i really dislike fishing out egg shells from my cholent. transfer to plata.

            spices: cumin, salt, black pepper.

            additions:
            wheat berries - soak one cup of wheat berries. put in cooky/cloth bag with whole head of garlic, paprika, and a little oil.

            rice: soak one cup rice. meanwhile saute one chopped onion. add to rice. add about 1/2 bunch finely chopped coriander/parsley. can add some nuts, pine nuts, raisins, etc. and about 1 tsp salt (i also add some baharat). put in cooky/cloth bag.

            put bags (eggs, wheat, rice) on top of cholent before you put on plata.

            can make the whole thing in your crockpot as well.

            Shira.


            --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, "sammy" <s@...> wrote:
            >
            > So, since the topic's come up and I posted a cholent recipe, would anyone else like to post theirs?
            >....
            >
            > sambo
            >
          • Mirjam Weiss
            I made this for lunch this Shabbat, stuffing the chicken with wheatberries and also adding a healthy dose of paprika. It was yummy, and the cholent haters in
            Message 5 of 17 , Jan 2, 2011
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              I made this for lunch this Shabbat, stuffing the chicken with wheatberries and also adding a healthy dose of paprika.  It was yummy, and the cholent haters in the family (that would be everyone but me) tolerated it and there are really no leftovers except for some chickpeas and wheatberries which I brought in today for lunch.




              On Thu, Dec 30, 2010 at 3:36 PM, sammy <s@...> wrote:

              Oh, an on-so-simple chicken "cholent" recipe...

              Saute a chopped onion in a small bit of oil.
              Put a whole chicken in your crock pot with the onion, a can of chick peas, a reasonable amount of hawaiij, and salt to taste. Water to cover. It's only a chicken, so you'll need a lunch to go with it, but it's delicious. If you start it cooking early enough Friday, the chicken literally falls apart and the bones melt to where people actually eat them! (That shocked me at first, but who am I to tell you what to put in your mouth?)


            • shirakestenbaum
              chicken and potato cholent /crockpot ... not exactly your regular cholent - perfect for cholent haters. brush the inside of crockpot with oil. layer 1-2
              Message 6 of 17 , Jan 2, 2011
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                chicken and potato "cholent"/crockpot
                -------------------------------------

                not exactly your regular cholent - perfect for cholent haters.

                brush the inside of crockpot with oil.

                layer 1-2 thickly sliced onions on the bottom.

                cover with layer of thickly chunked (or left whole) scrubbed (and peeled if you have to) potatoes. can also add sweet potatoes but they tend to disintegrate.

                take your spices - paprika, garlic, pepper, pinch of cumin, herbs if you like and mix together, then smear over chicken (whole or parts). place chicken on top of potatoes. add small amount of water (it's hard to say how much - some people don't add water at all, i like to add water about halfway up).

                cook on high for about one hour, then lower and cook overnight.

                shira

                --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, "sammy" <s@...> wrote:
                >
                > So, since the topic's come up and I posted a cholent recipe, would anyone else like to post theirs?
                >
                > I should mention that the recipe I posted is my wife's current favorite, but it's evolved over the years, and many of the iterations have been different and wonderful in their own ways. My mother-in-law's favorite features much the same ingredients, but with the addition of a calve's foot and most definitely no kishka to turn it into the thick Ashkenazi cholent so beloved in the Cold Countries. It's more soupy, and you can remove and serve the individual ingredients in recognizable form. This is easier if the meat's braised before cooking, so it maintains its form and doesn't fall apart. I've played around with rice, barley, various types of beans, chick peas, etc. I've added spinach, put in marrow bones, used lamb or chicken instead of beef, all sorts of things. Lamb, spinach and chick peas go very well together in the crock pot.
                >
                > Oh, an on-so-simple chicken "cholent" recipe...
                >
                > Saute a chopped onion in a small bit of oil.
                > Put a whole chicken in your crock pot with the onion, a can of chick peas, a reasonable amount of hawaiij, and salt to taste. Water to cover. It's only a chicken, so you'll need a lunch to go with it, but it's delicious. If you start it cooking early enough Friday, the chicken literally falls apart and the bones melt to where people actually eat them! (That shocked me at first, but who am I to tell you what to put in your mouth?)
                >
                > OK, I started, now run with it! :)
                >
                > sambo
                >
              • adelle
                Where do you get cloth cooky bags. I have only seen plastic ones Sent from my BlackBerry® smartphone from orange
                Message 7 of 17 , Jan 8, 2011
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                  Where do you get cloth cooky bags. I have only seen plastic ones
                  Sent from my BlackBerry® smartphone from orange
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