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Re: Home-corned beef

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  • cara_bereck
    Okay--I think I know where the store is, close to the King George side. Years ago, it was one of the few places you could buy Cheerios. My kids (now in their
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 1, 2009
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      Okay--I think I know where the store is, close to the King George side. Years ago, it was one of the few places you could buy Cheerios. My kids (now in their 20's) were addicted to them :-)

      About the bread:

      I bet if you:
      -heat the oven
      -put a flattish container on the bottom filled with boiling water.
      -brush the bread with water.
      you'd get a good tough consistency. I've seen such instructions in various places.

      As far as I know, Angel still does carry rye bread:

      http://www.angel.co.il/category/shifon_bread

      If they don't carry it in a local store, they would probably order it for you. Although I don't see it referred to that way on the Angel site, what you are looking for is called 'lechem kimmel'. I have seen it, relatively recently, in the main bakery in Jerusalem, unpackaged and unsliced.

      Cara

      --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, geoffrey mendelson <geoffreymendelson@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > On Nov 30, 2009, at 6:10 PM, Cara Levy wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > >There is also a store on Agrippas street (in Jerusalem) that sells
      > > corned beef with an impeccible hecksher.<
      > >
      > > Which store? I'm located on Neve Ilan.
      >
      > Someone else answered that already.
      >
      > > The corned beef you all refer to--what is the color once it is cooked?
      >
      > Pink.
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > > It's interesting that some of you cook corned beef with vegetables--
      > > I've only known it as a plain, boiled meat.
      >
      > I've had it with cabbage, potatoes and carrots.
      >
      >
      >
      > > And I thank you all for the other information!
      > >
      > > A club roll is a crusty roll; the crust is a bit tough.
      > > Angel used to make a decent rye, 'lechem kimmel', though I haven't
      > > had it for years.
      >
      > I wonder if they still do?
      >
      >
      > > Have you tried a pizza stone?
      >
      > No, it would not work. You would have to figure out some way of
      > injecting steam into the oven. That's why people recommend a clay pot
      > or dutch oven.
      >
      > It's large enough to minimize the differences in heat and closed it
      > steams the bread to make the crust. Then you remove the lid, and bake
      > it to harden the crust.
      >
      > I found this site very informative: http://www.breadtopia.com/
      >
      > Geoff.
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > geoffrey mendelson N3OWJ/4X1GM
      > Jerusalem Israel geoffreymendelson@...
      >
    • Martha Moradi
      (This subject was mentioned in the subject of the corned beef). I recently bought a kimmed bread at Angel s bakery.  It s possible that this is not rye bread
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 1, 2009
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        (This subject was mentioned in the subject of the corned beef).

        I recently bought a kimmed bread at Angel's bakery.  It's possible that this is not rye bread like in the "old county" - I certainly can't remember as I've been here for more that 40 years.  But I do love that kimmel bread!

        Tue, 12/1/09, cara_bereck <cara.levy@...> wrote:

        From: cara_bereck <cara.levy@...>
        Subject: [israel-food] Re: Home-corned beef
        To: israel-food@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, December 1, 2009, 3:20 AM

         
        Okay--I think I know where the store is, close to the King George side. Years ago, it was one of the few places you could buy Cheerios. My kids (now in their 20's) were addicted to them :-)

        About the bread:

        I bet if you:
        -heat the oven
        -put a flattish container on the bottom filled with boiling water.
        -brush the bread with water.
        you'd get a good tough consistency. I've seen such instructions in various places.

        As far as I know, Angel still does carry rye bread:

        http://www.angel. co.il/category/ shifon_bread

        If they don't carry it in a local store, they would probably order it for you. Although I don't see it referred to that way on the Angel site, what you are looking for is called 'lechem kimmel'. I have seen it, relatively recently, in the main bakery in Jerusalem, unpackaged and unsliced.

        Cara

        --- In israel-food@ yahoogroups. com, geoffrey mendelson <geoffreymendelson@ ...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > On Nov 30, 2009, at 6:10 PM, Cara Levy wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > >There is also a store on Agrippas street (in Jerusalem) that sells
        > > corned beef with an impeccible hecksher.<
        > >
        > > Which store? I'm located on Neve Ilan.
        >
        > Someone else answered that already.
        >
        > > The corned beef you all refer to--what is the color once it is cooked?
        >
        > Pink.
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > > It's interesting that some of you cook corned beef with vegetables--
        > > I've only known it as a plain, boiled meat.
        >
        > I've had it with cabbage, potatoes and carrots.
        >
        >
        >
        > > And I thank you all for the other information!
        > >
        > > A club roll is a crusty roll; the crust is a bit tough.
        > > Angel used to make a decent rye, 'lechem kimmel', though I haven't
        > > had it for years.
        >
        > I wonder if they still do?
        >
        >
        > > Have you tried a pizza stone?
        >
        > No, it would not work. You would have to figure out some way of
        > injecting steam into the oven. That's why people recommend a clay pot
        > or dutch oven.
        >
        > It's large enough to minimize the differences in heat and closed it
        > steams the bread to make the crust. Then you remove the lid, and bake
        > it to harden the crust.
        >
        > I found this site very informative: http://www.breadtop ia.com/
        >
        > Geoff.
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > geoffrey mendelson N3OWJ/4X1GM
        > Jerusalem Israel geoffreymendelson@ ...
        >


      • geoffrey mendelson
        ... It s sold that way for a reason. If it is sold sliced or wrapped in plastic it is not subsidised (nor is it counted in the cost of living calculations). If
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 1, 2009
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          On Dec 1, 2009, at 1:20 PM, cara_bereck wrote:
          >
          > If they don't carry it in a local store, they would probably order
          > it for you. Although I don't see it referred to that way on the
          > Angel site, what you are looking for is called 'lechem kimmel'. I
          > have seen it, relatively recently, in the main bakery in Jerusalem,
          > unpackaged and unsliced.
          >


          It's sold that way for a reason. If it is sold sliced or wrapped in
          plastic it is not subsidised (nor is it counted in the cost of living
          calculations). If it is sold unsliced and unwrapped, it is is
          subsidised and counted in the the cost of living calculations, so it
          will be much cheaper. That's why supermarkets have piles of plastic
          bags near the bread, similar to the vegetables and slicing machines
          past the registers.

          Geoff.

          --
          geoffrey mendelson N3OWJ/4X1GM
          Jerusalem Israel geoffreymendelson@...
        • geoffrey mendelson
          ... I ve seen as many or more that say it does not. The problem is you need steam at the begining, but around 2/3 of the way through it has to be dry. A little
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 1, 2009
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            On Dec 1, 2009, at 1:20 PM, cara_bereck wrote:

            >
            > I bet if you:
            > -heat the oven
            > -put a flattish container on the bottom filled with boiling water.
            > -brush the bread with water.
            > you'd get a good tough consistency. I've seen such instructions in
            > various places.
            >

            I've seen as many or more that say it does not. The problem is you
            need steam at the begining, but around 2/3 of the way through it has
            to be dry. A little hard to regulate.

            Besides I don't want it tough, I want it soft and springy, with a hard
            crust.

            Thanks,

            Geoff.
            --
            geoffrey mendelson N3OWJ/4X1GM
            Jerusalem Israel geoffreymendelson@...
          • geoffrey mendelson
            ... I found that the following worked for me, but it produced a soft bread with a thin soft crust. It is the best tasting bread I have ever had from a machine,
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 1, 2009
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              On Dec 1, 2009, at 3:02 PM, Martha Moradi wrote:

              >
              > (This subject was mentioned in the subject of the corned beef).
              >
              > I recently bought a kimmed bread at Angel's bakery. It's possible
              > that this is not rye bread like in the "old county" - I certainly
              > can't remember as I've been here for more that 40 years. But I do
              > love that kimmel bread!



              I found that the following worked for me, but it produced a soft bread
              with a thin soft crust. It is the best tasting bread I have ever had
              from a machine, and if you have any left it makes great toast. Not
              good for a corned beef sandwich, but still IMHO a winner.

              To be fair, I got the original recipe from the Betty Crocker web site,
              and modified to work in my machine with my ingredients. It's really a
              sourdough flavored yeast bread, not a real sourdough.

              2 cups bread flour (stybel #2)
              1 cup rye flour (stybel, but I forget the number)
              2 tablespoons sugar
              1 1/2 teaspoons salt
              1 teaspoon dry yeast
              1 teaspoon caraway seeds (you can go up to 2 tablespoons, but I like
              only a slight flavor)
              1 cup sourdough starter
              1 1/2 cups water (approx, see instructions).

              Put everything except 1/2 cup of the water in the machine. Set for
              whole wheat if you have a program for it, if not regular. Set for dark
              loaf if your machine has it. Start. There will be lots of flour around
              the edges of the loaf. Slowly add the water, one teaspoon at a time,
              until the flour is gone, but don't let the loaf become a "blob".

              If you add too much water cancel the program and start over adding
              small amounts of flour until it becomes a ball again.

              My machine has a feature for adding nuts, fruit,etc. It stops anter
              kneeding and beeps. Then you can add them and they become mixed in
              without adding too much flavor. You may add the caraway seeds then if
              you want a loaf with seeds and less flavor.

              This does not work if you use a delayed program.

              As a dietary comment, yes it has no fat added, and no milk. The salt
              and sugar are balanced to produce the necessary rising, the sugar
              feeds the yeast, the salt slows it down, so you can't change one or
              the other without experimenting to keep the balance.

              Geoff.

              --
              geoffrey mendelson N3OWJ/4X1GM
              Jerusalem Israel geoffreymendelson@...
            • Shelly Morer
              You can get a wonderful crust by putting a tray of water at the bottom of your oven - if you preheat the oven you have steam from the beginning. And you get
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 1, 2009
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                You can get a wonderful crust by putting a tray of water at the bottom of your oven - if you preheat the oven you have steam from the beginning. And you get the crust even crunchier if you spray water on the bread with a mister at the beginning and in the middle. I do it sometimes and get a great crust, with soft bread inside.

                On Tue, Dec 1, 2009 at 3:08 PM, geoffrey mendelson <geoffreymendelson@...> wrote:

                On Dec 1, 2009, at 1:20 PM, cara_bereck wrote:

                >
                > I bet if you:
                > -heat the oven
                > -put a flattish container on the bottom filled with boiling water.
                > -brush the bread with water.
                > you'd get a good tough consistency. I've seen such instructions in
                > various places.
                >

                I've seen as many or more that say it does not. The problem is you
                need steam at the begining, but around 2/3 of the way through it has
                to be dry. A little hard to regulate.

                Besides I don't want it tough, I want it soft and springy, with a hard
                crust.


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