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0% Milk (was Re: yogurt making)

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  • abe_leb
    I agree with Geoff and Annice about the lack of 0% milk and milk products. Where I emphatically disagree with Geoff is regarding the cottage cheese. Israeli
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 30, 2009
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      I agree with Geoff and Annice about the lack of 0% milk and milk products. Where I emphatically disagree with Geoff is regarding the cottage cheese. Israeli cottage is excellent and I don't recall getting a bad one within its expiration date. Tnuva has also improved the quality of the 3% cottage so that it is comparable to the 5%. By the way, the last time I saw statistics on the subject Tnuva 5% was the single most bought item in Israeli stores. That doesn't happen without a good product.
      Abe Lebowitz

      --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, "anniceyg" <annice@...> wrote:
      >
      > I agree with Geoff 100% about the lack of fatfree milk and cottage cheese here. I've complained to Tnuva, but it hasn't done any good. And, speaking of milk, why does a liter of fortified milk costs over 8 shekes here when you can get a half-gallon in the U.S. for less that that? Cottage cheese is similarly overpriced.
      >
      > Annice
      >
      > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, geoffrey mendelson <geoffreymendelson@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > On Sep 30, 2009, at 8:16 AM, Mirj wrote:
      > >
      > > > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, geoffrey mendelson
      > > > <geoffreymendelson@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > If you can get 0% milk you get fat free yogurt. If you use 1% you
      > > > get
      > > > > 1%. The taste is different, but that's your choice.
      > > >
      > > > Tnuva doesn't make 0% milk anymore. It hasn't been on the market for
      > > > months. Do you know of any other company (Tara? Yotvata?) that makes
      > > > 0% milk?
      > > >
      > >
      > > No, I have not seen it either, but someone last week said on this list
      > > that they had. I assumed if they did, you could still get it.
      > >
      > > If I were politicaly active (which I am not), I think it would be time
      > > to get the Minsitry of Health involved, as it IMHO is a public health
      > > issue that 0% fat dairy products have disappeared. While this country
      > > has the worst tasting cottage cheese I have ever had (half of what I
      > > get tastes too sour to eat), the lack of 0% or the old 1/2% is a
      > > disaster for people who need to limit the amount of animal fat they
      > > consume.
      > >
      > > Geoff.
      > >
      > > --
      > > geoffrey mendelson N3OWJ/4X1GM
      > > Jerusalem Israel geoffreymendelson@
      > >
      >
    • Frankels
      I ve been making my own yogurt for a couple of years now very successfully. This article in the New York Times got me started. I find it s significantly
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 21, 2011
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        I've been making my own yogurt for a couple of years now very successfully. This article in the New York Times got me started. I find it's significantly cheaper than store-bought and much yummier, too. I use 3% milk and some from each previous batch as a starter. I'm happy to share if anyone wants some.

        Yogurt-making

        Harold McGee (NYTimes)

        To make yogurt, first choose your starter yogurt. If no one offers you an heirloom, I recommend one of the ubiquitous global brands, sweeteners and stabilizers included. They tend to have very active bacterial cultures, including EPS producers, and the additives end up diluted to insignificant levels. Delicious specialty yogurts make less predictable starters.

        Then choose your milk. I prefer the flavor and consistency of yogurt made from whole milk. Many types of reduced-fat milk replace the fat with milk solids, including acid-producing lactose, and make a harsher tasting yogurt. Soy milk sets into a custardy curd that becomes very thin when stirred.

        Heat the fresh milk at 180 to 190 degrees, or to the point that it’s steaming and beginning to form bubbles. The heat alters the milk’s whey proteins and helps create a finer, denser consistency.

        Let the milk cool to around 115 to 120 degrees, somewhere between very warm and hot. For each quart of milk, stir in two tablespoons of yogurt, either store-bought or from your last batch, thinning it first with a little of the milk.

        Then put the milk in a warm jar or container or an insulated bottle, cover it, and keep the milk still and warm until it sets, usually in about four hours. I simply swaddle my quart jar in several kitchen towels. You can also put the container in an oven with the light bulb on.

        Once the yogurt sets, refrigerate it to firm its structure and slow the continuing acid production. To make a thick Greek-style yogurt, spoon it into a fine-mesh strainer or colander lined with cheesecloth, and let the whey and its lactic acid drain into a bowl for several hours. (Don’t discard the whey, whose yellow-green tint comes from riboflavin. It makes a refreshing cool drink, touched up with a little sugar or salt.)

      • Baruj Garcia
        I ve doing yogurt for a long time, too, specially when I lived in Barcelona and the only fresh daily product there was milk.I had a modern oven with computer
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 21, 2011
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          I've doing yogurt for a long time, too, specially when I lived in Barcelona and the only fresh daily product there was milk.I had a modern oven with computer that even had a "yogurt" position and kept the fermenting milk all night long in it at 40ºC. I always made my yogurt the greek way, thick. When I made aliyah, it surprised very much that people here called "gevinah levanah" to something that looked and tasted like my yogurt... I call it yogurt anyway, I can't call cheese something that you eat with a spoon...

          2011/9/21 Frankels <tziporahf@...>
           

          I've been making my own yogurt for a couple of years now very successfully. This article in the New York Times got me started. I find it's significantly cheaper than store-bought and much yummier, too. I use 3% milk and some from each previous batch as a starter. I'm happy to share if anyone wants some.

          Yogurt-making

          Harold McGee (NYTimes)

          To make yogurt, first choose your starter yogurt. If no one offers you an heirloom, I recommend one of the ubiquitous global brands, sweeteners and stabilizers included. They tend to have very active bacterial cultures, including EPS producers, and the additives end up diluted to insignificant levels. Delicious specialty yogurts make less predictable starters.

          Then choose your milk. I prefer the flavor and consistency of yogurt made from whole milk. Many types of reduced-fat milk replace the fat with milk solids, including acid-producing lactose, and make a harsher tasting yogurt. Soy milk sets into a custardy curd that becomes very thin when stirred.

          Heat the fresh milk at 180 to 190 degrees, or to the point that it’s steaming and beginning to form bubbles. The heat alters the milk’s whey proteins and helps create a finer, denser consistency.

          Let the milk cool to around 115 to 120 degrees, somewhere between very warm and hot. For each quart of milk, stir in two tablespoons of yogurt, either store-bought or from your last batch, thinning it first with a little of the milk.

          Then put the milk in a warm jar or container or an insulated bottle, cover it, and keep the milk still and warm until it sets, usually in about four hours. I simply swaddle my quart jar in several kitchen towels. You can also put the container in an oven with the light bulb on.

          Once the yogurt sets, refrigerate it to firm its structure and slow the continuing acid production. To make a thick Greek-style yogurt, spoon it into a fine-mesh strainer or colander lined with cheesecloth, and let the whey and its lactic acid drain into a bowl for several hours. (Don’t discard the whey, whose yellow-green tint comes from riboflavin. It makes a refreshing cool drink, touched up with a little sugar or salt.)


        • Rivka Wildman
          Which leads to the question, what exactly is g vina levana, anyway? Is it blended cottage cheese, reduced-fat cream cheese, something else? Thanks, Rivka
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 21, 2011
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            Which leads to the question, what exactly is g'vina levana, anyway?  Is it blended cottage cheese, reduced-fat cream cheese, something else?

            Thanks,
            Rivka Wildman

            On Sep 21, 2011 2:18 PM, "Baruj Garcia" <ijoquese@...> wrote:

             

            I've doing yogurt for a long time, too, specially when I lived in Barcelona and the only fresh daily product there was milk.I had a modern oven with computer that even had a "yogurt" position and kept the fermenting milk all night long in it at 40ºC. I always made my yogurt the greek way, thick. When I made aliyah, it surprised very much that people here called "gevinah levanah" to something that looked and tasted like my yogurt... I call it yogurt anyway, I can't call cheese something that you eat with a spoon...



            2011/9/21 Frankels <tziporahf@...>
            >
            >  
            >
            > I've been making my own yogurt for a couple of ...

          • Rivka Wildman
            On Sep 21, 2011 3:14 PM, Rivka Wildman wrote: Which leads to the question, what exactly is g vina levana, anyway? Is it blended
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 21, 2011
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              On Sep 21, 2011 3:14 PM, "Rivka Wildman" <rivka.wildman@...> wrote:

              Which leads to the question, what exactly is g'vina levana, anyway?  Is it blended cottage cheese, reduced-fat cream cheese, something else?

              Thanks,
              Rivka Wildman


              >
              > On Sep 21, 2011 2:18 PM, "Baruj Garcia" <ijoquese@...> wrote:
              >

               


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              > I've doing yogurt for a long time, too, specially when I lived in Barcelona and the only fresh ...


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              > 2011/9/21 Frankels <tziporahf@...>
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              > I've been making my own yogurt for a couple of ...


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            • Rivka Wildman
              Apologies for the multiple posts; I hit the send button by accident. Following up on g vina levana: a relative of mine in the States told me that Tnuva
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 21, 2011
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                Apologies for the multiple posts; I hit the send button by accident.

                Following up on g'vina levana:  a relative of mine in the States told me that Tnuva markets g'vina levana there, as "quark cheese."  However, this doesn't help much, as what I found online about quark cheese indicates it should have a curd, similar to ricotta cheese. 

                Also, just interesting, the process for making quark cheese sounds very similar to the process described on this list for making yogurt, only it starts with buttermilk, rather than fresh milk with added yogurt.  Which might explain why one lister said his yogurt was very much like g'vina levana.  Still, where are the curds?

                On Sep 21, 2011 3:14 PM, "Rivka Wildman" <rivka.wildman@...> wrote:

                Which leads to the question, what exactly is g'vina levana, anyway?  Is it blended cottage cheese, reduced-fat cream cheese, something else?

                Thanks,
                Rivka Wildman


                >
                > On Sep 21, 2011 2:18 PM, "Baruj Garcia" <ijoquese@...> wrote:
                >

                 


                >
                > I've doing yogurt for a long time, too, specially when I lived in Barcelona and the only fresh ...


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                > 2011/9/21 Frankels <tziporahf@...>
                > >
                > >  
                > >

                > I've been making my own yogurt for a couple of ...


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              • tribalhorn
                For those who don t want to get involved in higher mathematics, here is a video describing very simple yogurt making as our ancestors did it over the stove or
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 22, 2011
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                  For those who don't want to get involved in higher mathematics, here is a video describing very simple yogurt making as our ancestors did it over the stove or whatever...
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGG7Qn1QNkg&feature=player_embedded
                   
                  Brana Lobel

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