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Re: using slow-cooker recipes for shabbat lunch

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  • shira
    Years ago, I used to make a crockpot cholent for pessach that just had potatoes and chicken in it. I don t remember the exact recipe, but basically you
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Years ago, I used to make a crockpot "cholent" for pessach that just
      had potatoes and chicken in it. I don't remember the exact recipe,
      but basically you marinate the chicken however you like it, then coat
      the inside of the crock with oil, put some sliced onion on the
      bottom, add a layer of whole scrubbed potatoes, and put the chicken
      (whole or parts, but it's essential to use chicken with bones) on
      top. that's it. I don't think i added water to it, but as i said,
      this was a loooong time ago. The chicken comes out very soft.

      You can also do the chicken without potatoes - just use a rack, or
      make balls of tin foil and put the marinated chicken on top.

      shira

      --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, Vera Resnick <vera.homeopath@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Thought this might interest someone out there. I was recently
      reading
      > Claudia Roden's book on Jewish Food (thanks Marcia!) and came
      across a
      > reference to an apple pudding that was made erev shabbat and left
      in the
      > oven with the cholent to eat hot on shabbat during the day. She
      doesn't
      > give a recipe for the overnight version and hunting the internet
      got me
      > nowhere.
      >
      > Then I thought of slow cooker recipes that call for 9 hours on low
      etc.,
      > found a recipe for apple crisp with granola. I put the ingredients
      in a
      > dish, closed it, and put it in the toaster-oven at 75 degrees C,
      left it
      > overnight and had it last Shabbat mid-day - it was really good
      although the
      > recipe needs tweaking a bit. It also came out pretty brown but not
      burnt at
      > all.
      >
      > Does anyone have experience using these slow-cooking recipes for
      overnight
      > cooking? My family doesn't like cholent so I'm always looking for
      good
      > alternatives.
      >
      > Shabbat Shalom,
      >
      > Vera
      >
      > --
      > ------------------------------------
      > Vera Resnick RCHom
      > Classical Homeopath
      > Alternative Medicine
      > 054-4640736
      > e-mail: vera.homeopath@...
      > www.freewebs.com/verahomeopath
      >
    • Toby Curwin
      We love using our crockpot for non-cholent items. Soups tend not to get that distinctive cholent flavor, which is an advantage. This past week we made a very
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 2, 2009
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        We love using our crockpot for non-cholent items. Soups tend not to
        get that "distinctive cholent" flavor, which is an advantage. This
        past week we made a very yummy mushroom barley soup:
        http://www.cyber-kitchen.com/rfcj/SOUPS/Crockpot_Mushroom-Barley_Soup_-_meat.html

        and a couple of weeks ago, we made a delicious chili:
        http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/2008/11/barack-obamas-chili-recipe-in-crockpot.html
        (that one is yummy even if you're not a democrat)

        in general, I like getting ideas from http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/
        Recently she's had a lot of ham, but you can still use the basic
        concepts... plus check the archives for tons of great recipes.

        Also, our old standby is "roast" where we put onions, carrots,
        potatoes and a hunk of meat (we use turkey) in the crockpot, and it
        comes out 18 hours later tasting like brisket!

        Good luck, and enjoy!
        -Toby




        On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 11:40 AM, shira <s_kestenbaum@...> wrote:
        > Years ago, I used to make a crockpot "cholent" for pessach that just
        > had potatoes and chicken in it. I don't remember the exact recipe,
        > but basically you marinate the chicken however you like it, then coat
        > the inside of the crock with oil, put some sliced onion on the
        > bottom, add a layer of whole scrubbed potatoes, and put the chicken
        > (whole or parts, but it's essential to use chicken with bones) on
        > top. that's it. I don't think i added water to it, but as i said,
        > this was a loooong time ago. The chicken comes out very soft.
        >
        > You can also do the chicken without potatoes - just use a rack, or
        > make balls of tin foil and put the marinated chicken on top.
        >
        > shira
        >
        > --- In israel-food@yahoogroups.com, Vera Resnick <vera.homeopath@...>
        >
        > wrote:
        >>
        >> Thought this might interest someone out there. I was recently
        > reading
        >> Claudia Roden's book on Jewish Food (thanks Marcia!) and came
        > across a
        >> reference to an apple pudding that was made erev shabbat and left
        > in the
        >> oven with the cholent to eat hot on shabbat during the day. She
        > doesn't
        >> give a recipe for the overnight version and hunting the internet
        > got me
        >> nowhere.
        >>
        >> Then I thought of slow cooker recipes that call for 9 hours on low
        > etc.,
        >> found a recipe for apple crisp with granola. I put the ingredients
        > in a
        >> dish, closed it, and put it in the toaster-oven at 75 degrees C,
        > left it
        >> overnight and had it last Shabbat mid-day - it was really good
        > although the
        >> recipe needs tweaking a bit. It also came out pretty brown but not
        > burnt at
        >> all.
        >>
        >> Does anyone have experience using these slow-cooking recipes for
        > overnight
        >> cooking? My family doesn't like cholent so I'm always looking for
        > good
        >> alternatives.
        >>
        >> Shabbat Shalom,
        >>
        >> Vera
        >>
        >> --
        >> ------------------------------------
        >> Vera Resnick RCHom
        >> Classical Homeopath
        >> Alternative Medicine
        >> 054-4640736
        >> e-mail: vera.homeopath@...
        >> www.freewebs.com/verahomeopath
        >>
        >
        >
      • Annice Grinberg
        I have used my slow cooker (which is about 40 years old and running on a transformer) to make brisket for Shabbat lunch. I use savory seasonings (the easiest
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 2, 2009
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          I have used my slow cooker (which is about 40 years old and running on a transformer) to make brisket for Shabbat lunch.  I use savory seasonings (the easiest is a mix of mustard, ketchup and minced onion), and it is delicious.  Certainly doesn't taste like cholent!  I use a cooking bag, which saves immensely on clean-up time.

          I also have a baked bean recipe which I make overnight in the crockpot.  Great with pickled brisket, and much better (and cheaper) than Heinz.

          Annice

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