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Re: [israel-food] meat cuts (again)

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  • Ruth Baks
    To view an interactive guide to Israeli beef cuts (in Hebrew) click here: http://my.ynet.co.il/pic/food/caw/caw.swf (pass your mousse over the parts of the
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 11, 2007
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      Re: [israel-food] meat cuts (again)
      To view an interactive guide to Israeli beef cuts (in Hebrew) click here: http://my.ynet.co.il/pic/food/caw/caw.swf
      (pass your mousse over the parts of the cow)

      There are also English and Hebrew beef diagrams in our group archive:
      http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/israel-food/photos/browse/feb1
      >

      To compare with American beef cuts, see:
      http://www.loudouncattlemen.org/BeefCuts.html

      Note: each culture cuts its beef differently so when comparing Israeli cuts to those you may have been familiar with in your country of origin, expect the equivalents to be approximate.

      There are about 19 major cuts in Israel. The forequarter in Israel is numbered 1-10 and the
      hindquarter 11-18. Following are notes about each cut, matching the number to name of the cut, plus a description of suitable cooking methods.  These notes were collected from previous posts to this list.  Regard these as a general guide.  (Big thanks to Tsipi who contributed notes from the Jerusalem Post - which ran a feature on this subject - and also from the Ynet website.)

      Good luck!

      Ruth Baks
      Jerusalem
      ----

      Guide to Israeli beef cuts

      #1 in Hebrew:  Entrecote, Steak Ayin, Vered Hatzela.
      Ynet says for steaks and roast beef.
      JP says suitable for roasting and grilling.
      Known in the U.S. as rib and in the U.K. as forerib.

      #2  in Hebrew:  Rifaan, Tzlaot.
      Ynet says for cooking in sauce, roasting in a net, for cholent and for grinding.
      The JP says suitable for slow-roasting, e.g. pot roast and braising.
      Known in the U.S. and U.K. as chuck or blade, in France as basse-cote.
      Make great goulash with this cut.

      #3  in Hebrew:  Brust, Chazeh.
      Ynet says for pot roast, oven roast, soup, goulash and pickled meat (corned beef?).
      The JP says it's the favorite cut for salt/corned beef, known as brisket or front poitrine.
      Cheap here, lean and delicious after being roasted in a slow oven for a few hours.

      #4  in Hebrew:  Katef, Katef Mercazi.
      Ynet says for pot roast, cooking in sauce, goulash and grinding.
      The JP says pot roast and braising, known as rib or back rib in the U.S. and U.K.
      Plates de cote to the French.

      #5  in Hebrew:  Tzli, Tzli Katef.
      Ynet says for pot roast, cooking in sauce.
      The JP says the same as for #4.
      This is a great piece for slow roasting at low temp.

      #6  in Hebrew:  Falshe, Fillet Medumeh.
      Ynet says for pot roast and cooking in sauce.
      The JP says nothing but that it's good for the same as #4 and #5.

      #7  in Hebrew:  Polo (folo?), Shrir Hazroa or simply Shrir
      Ynet says for goulash, soup, cholent; with a bone -osso bucco.
      The JP just says suitable for soup.

      #9  in Hebrew:  Shpundra, Kashtit. (top rib)
      Ynet says for cholent, goulash and soup; with a bone - assado and spare ribs.
      The JP says for using in soups or boiling, known variously as flank, poitrine or short plate.

      #10 in Hebrew:  Tzavar.
      Ynet says for goulash, soup and grinding.
      The JP says suitable for soup.

      #11 in Hebrew:  Sinta, Moten.
      Ynet says for roast beef and steaks. 
      The JP says suitable for roasting and grilling.
      Known in the U.S. and U.K. as sirloin or porterhouse and in France as contre-fillet.

      #12 in Hebrew:  Fillet.
      Ynet says for steaks and carpaccio.
      The JP says simply "hard to find", suitable for roasting and grilling.

      #13 in Hebrew:  Shaitel, Kanaf Haoketz.
      Ynet says for shnitzel, steak, skewering and oven roasting.
      The JP says suitable for roasting and grilling.
      JP says cuts 13/16a are known in the U.S. are the round, in the U.K. as rump
      and in France as romsteak.

      #14 in Hebrew:  Katchke, Ozit (sp?).
      Ynet says for goulash, pot roast and grinding.
      The JP clumps together 14, 15 and 16 and says suitable for braising.

      #15 in Hebrew:  Chuck, Yarcha.
      Ynet says for pot roast.
      JP says suitable for braising.
       
      #16 in Hebrew:  Kaf.
      JP says suitable for braising.
      Ynet says for steak, shnitzel and roast.

      #17 in Hebrew:  Plada, Kislayim (sp?).
      Ynet says for rolada, goulash and grinding.
      The JP doesn't comment.

      #18 in Hebrew:  Poli, Shrir Achori.
      Ynet says for goulash, soup and cholent.
      The JP doesn't comment.

      #19 in Hebrew:  Weisbraten, Rosh Yarcha.
      Ynets says for pot roast.
      The JP doesn't comment.


      ====================
      At 1:12 PM +0200 11/11/07, Vivienne Tankus wrote:
      Someone kindly posted a link plus detailed information regarding the
      cuts of meat in Israel and their best uses. I have been experiencing
      computer problems and have no access to this. Please repost!
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