Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [israel-food] Re: Flank Steak

Expand Messages
  • lawmann
    I am usually in lurk mode, but I thought I d put my 2 cents in here. For an Israeli food group I don t understand why we re referring to cuts as not kosher.
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 31, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      I am usually in lurk mode, but I thought I'd put my 2 cents in here. For an
      Israeli food group I don't understand why we're referring to cuts as not
      kosher. One advantage of living in Israel is the availablility of rear cuts
      which are "trebbered." Outside of Israel these cuts are not available
      kosher, but, apparently, there's enough of a market in Israel so that it
      makes economic sense to prepare them as kosher here. (Of course, you may
      want to consult your halachic authority, but my halachic authority holds
      that these cuts, if properly trebbered, are fine.)

      Having said all that, though I have searched for flank steak here, I've
      never found it. As many of us discovered upon moving here, the way the beef
      is cut and prepared here is different than in the U.S. kosher market. So,
      for example, we can't find the chuck steak we were used to in the "old
      country." Flank steak is one of those cuts they just don't seem to make
      here, even though the rear cuts can be found kosher.

      Being a big fan of "London Broil," I have experimented with numerous cuts
      here. My experiments with Sinta (sirloin) were not successful and I wouldn't
      recommend using such an expensive cut, especially when one of the advantages
      of the cuts sold for London Broil in the U.S. is being able to use a lower
      priced cut of meat which, when prepared as London Broil, tastes and feels
      like a good steak or roast beef. The best cut I have found yet for this type
      of preparation is called "Spitz Chach" in Hebrew. "Chach" is a rear cut (not
      to be confused with the aforementioned and absent chuck steak). The whole
      cut is not suitable for London Broil, but the pointy-shaped end (ie, the
      "shpitz") worked great. Another cut that worked well is the top flap of the
      entrecote, which is sometimes sold in vaccuum packages at some better
      supermarket meat counters. When marinated and grilled, it comes out
      delicious. However, it is a pretty expensive cut (not much cheaper than
      entrecote).

      If any one has experimented with other cuts, please let us know.
      Scott

      > Renee, and list:
      > Renee, it seems, was correct. Flank steak is not a kosher cut, flanken is
      > a
      > different cut and is kosher.
      > I found this site, which gives a nice overview:
      > http://www.foodsubs.com/MeatBeefB&F.html
      > Varda Epstein
      >
      >
    • Geoffrey S. Mendelson
      ... It s economics. In the U.S. there is a large market for non kosher meat from kosher animals. Given the choice between properly preparing the meat from the
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 1 1:13 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        On Wed, Aug 01, 2007 at 01:33:42AM +0300, lawmann wrote:
        > I am usually in lurk mode, but I thought I'd put my 2 cents in here. For an
        > Israeli food group I don't understand why we're referring to cuts as not
        > kosher. One advantage of living in Israel is the availablility of rear cuts
        > which are "trebbered." Outside of Israel these cuts are not available
        > kosher, but, apparently, there's enough of a market in Israel so that it
        > makes economic sense to prepare them as kosher here. (Of course, you may
        > want to consult your halachic authority, but my halachic authority holds
        > that these cuts, if properly trebbered, are fine.)

        It's economics. In the U.S. there is a large market for non kosher
        meat from kosher animals. Given the choice between properly preparing
        the meat from the rear of the cow for sale here or destroying it, it
        gets prepared and sold.

        In the U.S. where labor is expensive, the traddition of not selling
        meat from the rear of the cow came about. When I was growing up,
        there was a large kosher slaughter house in Philly, called Cross
        Brothers (yes I appreicate the pun).

        Once an animal was killed it was checked according to halacha. If it did
        not pass inspection, and the rear of the cow (where some of the best
        parts are) it would be sold to the top restaurants and hotels as
        nonkosher meat.

        This is what made the production of kosher meat by them economicly viable.
        In effect almost every steak, hamburger, etc sold by a nonkosher restaurant
        in Philly susidised kosher meat.

        The same thing works in reverse here for organic meats. Since organic
        meats come from animals who are more likley to be diseased and therefore
        can not be used for kosher meat, small farmers can't afford to raise them.
        There is not enough market for their rejects.

        Geoff.

        --
        Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm@... N3OWJ/4X1GM
        IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
        Visit my 'blog at http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
      • Myron Weintraub
        Kosher flank steak was available in the Old Country as was skirt steak. Skirt steak was easy to find, but flank steak was available only occasionally, in
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 1 9:20 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Kosher flank steak was available in the Old Country as was skirt steak. Skirt steak was easy to find, but flank steak was available only occasionally, in Chicago at a Chicago Rabbinical Council-supervised store, so the hechsher was a reliable one.

          Since flank steak doesn't seem to exist here, does anyone know about skirt steak's availability here, and how one can ask for it (i.e., cut number).

          Thanks!
          Marilyn Weintraub
          Modi'in



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • suellen
          Flank steak is definitely kosher. I always bought them at the kosher butcher in Atlanta. I ve also bought them at a kosher butcher shop in Monsey. -- Sue
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 1 11:18 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Flank steak is definitely kosher. I always bought them at the kosher
            butcher in Atlanta. I've also bought them at a kosher butcher shop in
            Monsey.

            --
            Sue Epstein
            Efrat 90435
            Israel


            Freelance food writer, cookbook author, recipe developer and cookbook reviewer.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.