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Re : Respecting our differences

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  • Cemil Celepci
    ... Cemil Celepci cemilcelepci@yahoo.com Istanbul / Turkiye islamicdialogue@yahoogroups.com Moderatörü http://groups.yahoo.com/group/islamicdialogue -
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2006
      --- Abu Zahrin Abu Bakar <hajizahrin@...>
      wrote:

      > From: Abu Zahrin Abu Bakar <hajizahrin@...>
      > To: "aadila@..." <aadila@...>,
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      > Subject: FW: [Multicul-Pluralism Grp] Re :
      > Respecting our differences
      > Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2006 09:55:46 +0000
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > To: emfmoussa@...:
      > emfmoussa@...: Fri, 1 Dec 2006 09:50:47
      > +0200Subject: [Multicul-Pluralism Grp] Re :
      > Respecting our differences
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > The following is an excellent article shows how true
      > Islam tolerates differences.
      > I want to add a little story showing how a humble
      > man may know more than a scholar.
      > Imam Al Sha¡¦arany was the Chief judge of Egypt he
      > used to pass by a basket maker who people considered
      > a ¡§Waly¡¨ (a pious man gifted by Allah). He used to
      > say to him Allah never had an Ignorant ¡§Waly¡¨. One
      > day The basket maker looked back to him and said
      > :¡¨He has him and teach him¡¨. Al Sha¡¦arany
      > realized at once the extra ordinary reply. He
      > dismounted his mule and kissed the basket maker¡¦s
      > hand. Later Sha¡¦arany wrote a book titled: ¡§the
      > basket maker answers to Sha¡¦arany¡¦s questions¡¨.
      > This resembles the answer of the man that shook
      > hands with his neighbors after salat to the
      > objection. In fact Sunnah means the way not the
      > literal action. It is obvious that saying ¡§assalamu
      > alaykom¡¨ is greeting the same as shaking hands. So
      > the man was not out of sunnah as the narrow minded
      > scholar imagined and blindfolded follower did.
      > -----------------
      > A. M.
      >
      > Respecting our differences Waste no time debating
      > what a good Muslim should be. Be one! by Muhammad
      > Alshareef
      > Imam Malik one day entered the Masjid after Asr.
      > Towards the front of Masjid An-Nabawee he drew
      > closer and sat down. Rasul Allah had commanded that
      > anyone who enters the Masjid should not sit until he
      > first prays 2 rakas as a salutation of the Masjid.
      > Imam Malik was of the opinion however that Rasul
      > Allah's forbiddance of praying after Asr took
      > precedence and so he would teach his students to not
      > pray the tahiyyatul Masjid if they entered between
      > the Asr and Maghrib time.
      > At that moment that Imam Malik sat down, a young boy
      > had seen him sit without first praying the 2 raka's
      > of Tahiyyatul Masjid. The young boy scorned him,
      > "Get up and pray 2 rakas!"
      > Imam Malik dutifully stood up once again and began
      > praying the 2 rakas. The students sat stunned: What
      > was going on? Had Imam Malik's opinion changed?
      > After he had completed the salah, the students
      > swarmed around and questioned his actions. Imam
      > Malik said, "My opinion has not changed, nor have I
      > gone back on what I taught you earlier. I merely
      > feared that had I not prayed the 2 rakas as the
      > young boy commanded, Allah may include me in the
      > Ayah...
      > "And when it is said to them, 'Bow (in prayer)',
      > they do not bow." - al mursalat 77/48.
      > Imam Ahmad held the opinion that eating camel meat
      > nullifies ones Wudhu, an opinion that the majority
      > of scholars differed from. Some students asked him,
      > "If you find an Imam eating camel meat in front of
      > you and - without first making Wudu - then leads the
      > Salah, would you pray behind him?" Imam Ahmad
      > replied, "Do you think I would not pray behind the
      > likes of Imam Malik and Sa'eed ibn Al-Musayyab?"
      > Allah created humans with differences. It is the law
      > of creation. Different tongues, different colors,
      > different cultures...all that on the outside. On the
      > inside, humans were created with many degrees of
      > knowledge, intellect, and comprehension of concepts.
      > This is all a sign of Allah's all encompassing power
      > to do whatever He wills:
      > "And among His signs is the creation of the heavens
      > and the earth, and the variations in your languages
      > and your colors: verily in that are signs for those
      > who know." [30:22]
      > Humans shall differ, that is not the issue. The
      > issue is: How as a Muslim should one confront these
      > differences of opinions and what should be our
      > relationship with someone of a different opinion.
      > Allah ta'ala commanded us to call and advise people
      > in this Deen of Al-Islam. Many Muslims set off on
      > this mission blindfolded, not realizing that the map
      > was there in the Qur'an also. In fact, in the very
      > same verse where Allah commanded us to call and
      > advise people in this Deen, Allah taught us how to
      > do it. Read the following verse carefully:
      > "Invite (fi'l Amr - Allah is commanding) to the way
      > of your Lord with wisdom and good instruction and
      > argue with them in a way that is best! " - Surah
      > An-Nahl 16/125.
      > There is no need to philosophize. No need to talk in
      > the flower gardens. It is right there, plain and
      > simple for anyone who would take heed.
      > There in that Ayah are the three ingredients to
      > apply when we disagree with someone. The same Allah
      > that taught us to debate the truth, taught us how to
      > do it:
      > 1 - With Hikmah (wisdom) 2 - With good instruction,
      > and 3 - To argue in a way that is best.
      > What does it mean to have Hikmah when differing with
      > someone? The grandsons of Rasul Allah(saw) once set
      > one of the most beautiful examples of Hikmah in
      > advising others. Al-Hasan and Al-Husayn - in their
      > young age - once saw a senior man performing Wudu
      > incorrectly. Together they arranged a plan to teach
      > the man without insulting him, advising him in a
      > manner befitting of his age.
      > Together they went to the senior and announced, "My
      > brother and I have differed over who amongst us
      > performs Wudu the best. Would you mind being the
      > judge to determine which one of us indeed performs
      > Wudu more correctly."
      > The man watched intently as the two grandsons of
      > Rasul Allah performed Wudu in an explicit manner.
      > After they had completed, he thanked them and said,
      > "By Allah, I did not know how to perform Wudu before
      > this. You have both taught me how to do it
      > correctly."
      > We must understand that there are two dimensions to
      > Hikmah. Firstly, there is the Hikmah of knowledge -
      > Hikmah Ilmiyyah. And secondly, there is the Hikmah
      > of Action - Hikmah Amaliyyah.
      > Some people may have Hikmah of knowledge. But we see
      > that when they try correcting others, advising them,
      > they lack the Hikmah of Action. This causes many a
      > common folk to reject the Hikmah of knowledge.
      > To illustrate this hikmah of knowledge without
      > Hikmah of action, a brother once completed the Salah
      > in a local Masjid and then proceeded to shake hands
      > with the people on his right and left. The brother
      > to his immediate right slapped his hand and snapped,
      > "That is not part of the Sunnah!" The man replied
      > most correctly, "Oh, is disrespect and insult part
      > of the Sunnah?"
      > To show Hikmah when we differ requires the
      > following:
      > Sincerity
      > One: If we differ, our intentions should be that we
      > are differing in the sincere hope of coming away
      > with the truth. Our intentions should be sincere to
      > Allah.
      > We should not differ just to release some hate or
      > envy in our heart. We should not differ to embarrass
      > someone like we may have been embarrassed.
      > Rasul Allah said, "Whoever learns knowledge -
      > knowledge from that which should be sought for the
      > sake of Allah - only to receive a commodity of the
      > material world, he shall not find the fragrance of
      > jannah on the day of resurrection." - An authentic
      > hadith narrated by Abu Dawood in Kitab Al-Ilm.
      > Kindness and Gentleness
      > Two: To have Hikmah when differing means we should
      > rarely depart from an atmosphere of kindness and
      > gentleness, we should seldom allow ourselves to
      > become angry and raise our voices.
      > Fir'own (Pharaoh) was one of the evilest people that
      > lived. Musa was one of the noblest. Look at how
      > Allah told Musa to advise Fir'own...
      > "Go, both of you, to Fir'own. Indeed, he has
      > transgressed. And speak to him with gentle speech,
      > perhaps he may remember or fear (Allah)."
      > A man once entered upon the Khalifah and chastised
      > him for some policies he had taken. The Khalifah
      > replied, "By Allah, Fir'own was more eviler than me.
      > And by Allah, Musa was more pious than you. Yet,
      > Allah commanded him...'And speak to him with gentle
      > speech, perhaps he may remember or fear (Allah).'"
      > Take Your Time and Clarify
      > Three: To have Hikmah when dealing with others is to
      > be patient and clarify things before snapping to
      > conclusions.
      > Imam Ahmad narrates with his chain of narrators
      > leading to Ibn Abbas who said, "A man from Bani
      > Saleem passed by a group of the Prophet's
      > companions. (At that time of war) The man said 'as
      > salamu alaykum' to them. The companions concluded
      > that he only said 'as salamu alaykum' to them as a
      > deception to save himself from being caught. They
      > surrounded him and Malham ibn Juthaamah killed him.
      > From that event Allah revealed the verse...
      > "O you who have believed, when you go forth (to
      > fight) in the cause of Allah, investigate, and do
      > not say to one who gives you (a greeting of peace),
      > "You are not a believer," Aspiring for the goods of
      > worldly life; for with Allah are many acquisitions.
      > You (yourselves) were like that before; then Allah
      > conferred His favor (i.e. guidance) upon you, so
      > investigate. Indeed, Allah is ever with what you do,
      > acquainted." - Surah AnNisa, 4/94. From Tafseer Ibn
      > Katheer.
      > Speak Kindly
      > Fourthly, never trade in kind words for harshness,
      > especially when dealing with other Muslims.
      > Look at the power of a sincere and polite word:
      > Mus'ab ibn Umayr was the first of ambassador of
      > Rasul Allah in Madinah. Before Rasul Allah had
      > arrived in Madinah, Mus'ab taught ahl al-Madinah
      > about Islam and they began to enter the Deen.
      > This enraged Sa'd ibn 'Ubaadah, one of the
      > chieftains of Madinah. He sheathed his sword and set
      > off for the head of Mus'ab ibn 'Umayr. When he
      > confronted Mus'ab he threatened, "Stop this nonsense
      > you speak or you shall find yourself dead!"
      > Mus'ab replied in the way that should be a lesson
      > for us all. This man before him did not stop at
      > rudeness and ignorance, he wanted to slit his
      > throat.
      > Mus'ab said, "Shall you not sit and listen for a few
      > moments. If you agree with what I say then take it,
      > and if not, we shall desist from this talk." Sa'd
      > sat down.
      > Mus'ab spoke about Allah and His messenger until the
      > face of Sa'd ibn Ubaadah's face shone like a full
      > moon and he said, "What should a person do who
      > wishes to enter into this Deen?" After Mus'ab had
      > told him he said, "There is a man, if he accepts
      > this Deen, there shall be no home in Madinah that
      > will not become Muslim. Sa'd ibn Mu'aadh."
      > When Sa'd ibn Mu'aadh heard what was happening, he
      > was infuriated. He left his home to go and kill this
      > man called Mus'ab ibn Umayr for the dissention he
      > had caused. He entered upon Mus'ab and announced,
      > "You shall desist of this religion you speak of or
      > you shall find yourself dead!"
      > Mus'ab replied, "Shall you not sit and listen for a
      > few moments. If you agree with what I say then take
      > it, and if not, I shall desist from this talk." Sa'd
      > sat.
      > Mus'ab spoke about Allah and His messenger until the
      > face of Sa'd ibn Mu'aadh's face shone like a full
      > moon and he said, "What should a person do who
      > wishes to enter into this Deen?"
      > Look at what a kind word did. Sa'd ibn Mu'aadh went
      > home to his Madinan tribe that night and announced
      > to them all, "Everything of yours is Haram upon me
      > until you all enter into Islam."
      > That night, every home in Madinah went to bed with
      > Laa ilaaha illa Allah...all because of a kind word.
      > Part II: Who wins?
      > Mu'aawiyah ibn al-Hakam al-Salami. When he came to
      > Madeenah from the desert, he did not know that it
      > was forbidden to speak during the salaah. He
      > relates: "Whilst I was praying behind the Messenger
      > of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon
      > him), a man sneezed, so I said 'Yarhamuk Allaah (may
      > Allaah have mercy on you).' The people glared at me,
      > so I said, 'May my mother lose me! What is wrong
      > with you that you are looking at me?' They began to
      > slap their thighs with their hands, and when I saw
      > that they were indicating that I should be quiet, I
      > stopped talking (i.e., I nearly wanted to answer
      > them back, but I controlled myself and kept quiet).
      > When the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of
      > Allaah be upon him) had finished praying - may my
      > father and mother be sacrificed for him, I have
      > never seen a better teacher than him before or since
      > - he did not scold me or hit me or put me to shame.
      > He just said, 'This prayer should contain nothing of
      > the speech of men; it is only tasbeeh and takbeer
      > and recitation of the Qur'aan.'" (Saheeh Muslim,
      > 'Abd al-Baaqi edn., no. 537).
      > Islam showed us how to differ with one another. Some
      > people think that we should never differ at all and
      > all disagreements should be avoided. Nay, this is an
      > incorrect assumption, for the Qur'an and Sunnah show
      > clearly that when a mistake is made it should be
      > corrected. Indeed helping others do what is right is
      > a requirement of the Deen, sincere Naseeha.
      > We see when Rasul Allah turned away from AbdAllah
      > ibn Umm Maktoom, the blind man, Allah corrected him
      > in the Qur'an...
      > "(The Prophet) frowned and turned away, Because
      > there came to him the blind man But what could tell
      > you that perchance he might become pure (from sins)?
      > Or that he might receive admonition, and that the
      > admonition might profit him?" - surah Abasa, 1-4
      > When Haatib ibn Abi Balta'ah (may Allaah be pleased
      > with him) made the mistake of writing to the kuffaar
      > of Quraysh and informing them of the direction in
      > which the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be
      > upon him) was headed on a military campaign against
      > them, Allaah revealed the words:
      > "O you who believe! Take not My enemies and your
      > enemies as friends..." - Surah Mumtahinah/1
      > And so on. Thus we learn that when a mistake happens
      > it should be corrected. However, the method of
      > correction is what needs our attention.
      > Whenever Muslims argue, it is as if each party
      > carries a banner of: 'I must win and you must lose!'
      > Careful study of the Sunnah however shows us that
      > this is not always the case with the way Rasul Allah
      > acted. Consider the following examples:
      > "I lose and you win!"
      > A Bedouin came to Rasul Allah and told him, "Give me
      > from what Allah gave you, not from the wealth of
      > your mother nor from the wealth of your father." The
      > Sahaabah were furious at the man and step forward to
      > discipline him for what he said. Rasul Allah
      > commanded everyone to leave him.
      > Then by the hand, Rasul Allah took him home, opened
      > his door and said, "Take what you wish and leave
      > what you wish." The man did so and after he
      > completed, Rasul Allah asked him, "Have I honored
      > you?" "Yes, by Allah," said the Bedouin. "Ash hadu
      > an laa ilaaha illa Allah, wa ashhadu anna Muhammadar
      > Rasul Allah." (Meaning he embraced Islam)
      > When the Sahabah heard of how the man changed, Rasul
      > Allah taught them. "Verily the example of myself,
      > you and this Bedouin is that of a man who had his
      > camel run away. The townspeople tried capturing the
      > camel for him by running and shouting after the
      > camel, only driving it further away. The man would
      > shout, 'Leave me and my camel, I know my camel
      > better.' Then he took some grass in his hand,
      > ruffled it in front of the camel, until it came
      > willingly.
      > 'By Allah, had I left you to this Bedouin, you would
      > have hit him, hurt him, he would have left without
      > Islam and eventually have entered hellfire."
      > "I win and you lose!"
      > A Muslim should not have an apologetic stance to
      > everything he is confronted with. There are times
      > when the truth must be said, when there is no room
      > for flattery.
      > When the Makhzoomi women - a women from an affluent
      > family - stole, people approached Rasul Allah to
      > have her punishment canceled. Rasul Allah became
      > very angry and stood on the pulpit and announced,
      > "By Allah, had Fatima the daughter of Muhammad stole
      > I would have cut her hand off."
      > No room for flattery, the truth must be stood up
      > for. It is here that the etiquette of disagreement
      > that we talked earlier about should shine.
      > "I win and you win!"
      > There doesn't always have to be a loser. We see in
      > many cases that Rasul Allah gave a way out for the
      > people he differed with.
      > When he sent the letter to Caesar, he said in it,
      > "Become Muslim and you shall be safe, Allah shall
      > give you your reward double!"
      > He did not say surrender or die! Nothing of the
      > sort. Become Muslim and you shall win, rather your
      > victory shall be double.
      > I shall end with this shining example of how to act
      > with other Muslims from our role model, Abu Bakr:
      > Abu Bakr once disputed with another companion about
      > a tree. During the dispute Abu Bakr said something
      > that he rather would not have said. He did not
      > curse, he did not attack someone's honor, he did not
      > poke a fault in anyone, all he said was something
      > that may have hurt the other companion's feelings.
      > Immediately, Abu Bakr - understanding the mistake -
      > ordered him, "Say it back to me!" The companion
      > said, "I shall not say it back." "Say it back to
      > me," said Abu Bakr, "Or I shall complain to the
      > Messenger of Allah." The companion refused to say it
      > back and went on his way.
      > Abu Bakr went to Rasul Allah and related what had
      > happened and what he said. Rasul Allah called that
      > companion and asked him, "Did Abu Bakr say so and so
      > to you?" He said, "Yes." He said, "What did you
      > reply." He said, "I did not reply it back to him."
      > Rasul Allah said, "Good, do not reply it back to him
      > (do not hurt Abu Bakr). Rather say, 'May Allah
      > forgive you O Abu Bakr!'"
      > The Companion turned to Abu Bakr and said, "May
      > Allah forgive you O Abu Bakr! May Allah forgive you
      > O Abu Bakr!" Abu Bakr turned and cried as he walked
      > away.
      > Let us leave today with a resolve to revive this air
      > Rasul Allah and his companions breathed, an air of
      > mercy and love and brotherhood.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      --------------------------------------------------------
      Cemil Celepci
      cemilcelepci@...
      Istanbul / Turkiye
      islamicdialogue@yahoogroups.com Moderatörü
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