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Re: Exploring an excellent question

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  • Charu
    I keep thinking of Quinn s retelling of Cain and Abel. Cain presents his agriculture offerings and Abel wins favor because the traditional lifestyle of
    Message 1 of 75 , Jul 2, 2006
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      I keep thinking of Quinn's retelling of Cain and Abel. Cain presents
      his agriculture offerings and Abel wins favor because the traditional
      lifestyle of Hebrews was that of herders. Quinn raises the question,
      how in a thousand years can the lifestyle of a people change to adopt
      that which they condemn?

      The first thing that comes to mind is capturing and enslaving
      populations to do the dirty work while the elite can enjoy decadent
      comfortable lives. It is an easy story to believe, it is demonstrated
      in carvings on palace walls around the world, but it also seems too
      simple. The fear of death and punishment does not seem to be enough
      to motivate large populations. There are worse things than dying and
      to me slavery is one of them.
      "The Beginnings of Agriculture" as seen in textbooks and
      documentaries, states that it took 7000 years for corn to achieve the
      modern fruitful version, and 9000 to result in better grain plants. I
      have look into how much could have occurred simply by frequent
      harvesting and how much of these improvements occurred because of
      deliberate manipulation. I have looked at charts showing when these
      crops first "appeared" and which crops coincided. Should I be
      surprised that cocaine was developed and produced as a crop about the
      same time as corn? Opium about the same time as rice? Beer and wine
      about the same time as wheat and barley?

      My sister use to work for a coin dealer. She told me that the oldest
      money coined had, not emblems of the rulers on them, but the primary
      ingredients to alcoholic drinks, grapes, barley, and hops. These were
      used in exchange for exactly what was on the coin. I remember her
      joking with me when I joined the Navy that I was lucky I enlisted when
      I did. Now days sailors get paid in money instead of in rum. I told
      her most of the young men I worked with spent their entire checks on
      alcohol, so I'm not sure if there is much of a difference.

      I postulate that in the beginning agriculture was driven by the people
      to meet their addictions. It may have benefited the royalty and
      merchants in wealth and power, but the people's own addictions
      motivated them more strongly than any fear of death of punishment
      could.

      Our societies current addictions besides, drugs and alcohol, have been
      schooled into us. Innate needs have been converted to the more
      marketable problems. For every discomfort that comes from being
      enslaved in this system, there is a product that can alleviate the
      pain, distress, and unhappiness, and if you can't afford that product
      or lifestyle, you can always work harder to get it. In addition, in
      the course of this time, our agricultural specialist have created food
      that is addictive, processed sugar, caffeine, and even white flour.

      We get more efficient because we are becoming increasingly tolerant of
      the addictions. We need higher doses or new addictions to keep
      hooked.

      Charu
    • Charu
      I keep thinking of Quinn s retelling of Cain and Abel. Cain presents his agriculture offerings and Abel wins favor because the traditional lifestyle of
      Message 75 of 75 , Jul 2, 2006
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        I keep thinking of Quinn's retelling of Cain and Abel. Cain presents
        his agriculture offerings and Abel wins favor because the traditional
        lifestyle of Hebrews was that of herders. Quinn raises the question,
        how in a thousand years can the lifestyle of a people change to adopt
        that which they condemn?

        The first thing that comes to mind is capturing and enslaving
        populations to do the dirty work while the elite can enjoy decadent
        comfortable lives. It is an easy story to believe, it is demonstrated
        in carvings on palace walls around the world, but it also seems too
        simple. The fear of death and punishment does not seem to be enough
        to motivate large populations. There are worse things than dying and
        to me slavery is one of them.
        "The Beginnings of Agriculture" as seen in textbooks and
        documentaries, states that it took 7000 years for corn to achieve the
        modern fruitful version, and 9000 to result in better grain plants. I
        have look into how much could have occurred simply by frequent
        harvesting and how much of these improvements occurred because of
        deliberate manipulation. I have looked at charts showing when these
        crops first "appeared" and which crops coincided. Should I be
        surprised that cocaine was developed and produced as a crop about the
        same time as corn? Opium about the same time as rice? Beer and wine
        about the same time as wheat and barley?

        My sister use to work for a coin dealer. She told me that the oldest
        money coined had, not emblems of the rulers on them, but the primary
        ingredients to alcoholic drinks, grapes, barley, and hops. These were
        used in exchange for exactly what was on the coin. I remember her
        joking with me when I joined the Navy that I was lucky I enlisted when
        I did. Now days sailors get paid in money instead of in rum. I told
        her most of the young men I worked with spent their entire checks on
        alcohol, so I'm not sure if there is much of a difference.

        I postulate that in the beginning agriculture was driven by the people
        to meet their addictions. It may have benefited the royalty and
        merchants in wealth and power, but the people's own addictions
        motivated them more strongly than any fear of death of punishment
        could.

        Our societies current addictions besides, drugs and alcohol, have been
        schooled into us. Innate needs have been converted to the more
        marketable problems. For every discomfort that comes from being
        enslaved in this system, there is a product that can alleviate the
        pain, distress, and unhappiness, and if you can't afford that product
        or lifestyle, you can always work harder to get it. In addition, in
        the course of this time, our agricultural specialist have created food
        that is addictive, processed sugar, caffeine, and even white flour.

        We get more efficient because we are becoming increasingly tolerant of
        the addictions. We need higher doses or new addictions to keep
        hooked.

        Charu
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