Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Newbie Host tips? Anyone? Please?

Expand Messages
  • captain_cohen
    Apparently, for a group of people I ve interested in Ironclaw, we re the only group of people ho play Ironclaw in the area...that we can get to. So, it falls
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1, 2003
      Apparently, for a group of people I've interested in Ironclaw, we're
      the only group of people ho play Ironclaw in the area...that we can
      get to.

      So, it falls unto me, as the sole owner of the Ironclaw books (That
      better change....*glares at Nellie Gail living friend*) to be the one
      to host.

      Why? Because for two reasons:

      1. I know the rules better than anyone else
      2. If I didn't host I'd be the damned rules lawyer, beacuse of number
      1.

      The only problem is, I tried DMing a DnD campaign once.

      There were three guys, one with a horse. I wanted to kill the horse,
      so I made an encounter with wolves.

      Only the horse survived.


      So what I"m looking for is someone to give me some tips from
      experiance Hosting or dealing with Hosts and somesuch....


      THank you.

      Samuel/Glenn/Bengaley/Captain_cohen/TNPE/Dodger
    • Arlene Medder
      ... 1) relax 2) cheat (if the dice say that the mastiff s bite would do 5 wounds & the character is not combat oriented - so low resolve & body, then cheat &
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 1, 2003
        Quoting captain_cohen <arlenecohen@...>:
        >
        >
        > So what I"m looking for is someone to give me some tips from
        > experiance Hosting or dealing with Hosts and somesuch....
        >
        >
        >

        1) relax
        2) cheat (if the dice say that the mastiff's bite would do 5 wounds &
        the character is not combat oriented - so low resolve & body, then
        cheat & call it 2 wounds)

        Being the rules lawyer yourself will help. Just remember to not let the
        rules get in the way of having fun.

        For specific questions, feel free to ask me. Just did the math last
        night. Been running my current campaign since March/April 2001. Not
        continuously, we played Jadeclaw this past summer for example. But it's
        ongoing.


        Arlene Medder
      • Ted MacKinnon
        ... & ... My suggestion entirely. Never let the dice rule the story. Don t kill characters who have been smart up to this point, and because of the story,
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 1, 2003
          > 1) relax
          > 2) cheat (if the dice say that the mastiff's bite would do 5 wounds
          &
          > the character is not combat oriented - so low resolve & body, then
          > cheat & call it 2 wounds)

          My suggestion entirely. Never let the dice rule the story. Don't
          kill characters who have been smart up to this point, and because of
          the story, find themselves in hot spots.

          And don't roll in front of the players, or tell them you'll cheat to
          keep them alive. If you do, never mention it. Ever. :)

          Now, if they're just plain dumb, well, they might get eaten. But I,
          personally, usually give a warning (dead loved NPC, missing limb,
          that sort of thing).

          Be consistant with your house rules. Be CAREFUL with your house
          rules. Remember, you're setting a precedent.

          Talk to your players. See what THEY think about a ruling. Heck,
          you're all in it together, and anything they automatically say "Yes"
          to because it gives them a bonus also applies to villains.

          Be prepared to say, "Ooops, I screwed up." Nothing is worse than a
          GM bound and determined to prove he was right, because he's the GM,
          darn it!

          Talk to the players more - find out what they want out of the
          campaign. If you've planned an intrigue based campaign, it stinks to
          find out everyone has plans to make an atavist explorer...and worse,
          aren't interested in intrigue!

          To paraphrase and repeat - give the players a break.

          A new point - give the villains a brain. They have motives. Figure
          them out. Very few people think they are in the wrong, or are
          EEEEvil. So people usually have (in their own minds) a good reason
          for doing something nasty.

          Give your NPC's life, free will, and the ability to affect what's
          happening...but not too much. NEVER allow an NPC to steal the show
          from the players. Help, yes. Cooperate, yes. Steal the show? THe
          players are the heroes. Even if they are outclassed by the two
          battling wizards, make sure they know that if they didn't hold off
          the other wizard's army of goons, the good wizard they're working for
          would be fish food before he won the magical duel.

          A personal preference hint - do NOT have a 'pet npc' - you know, the
          one you'd play if you were a player? Who's always with the party, an
          equal member? Don't - either the pet NPC takes up the spotlight, or
          he does nothing, and isn't terribly exciting for you. :) Some
          people may disagree, but that's my opinion.

          When describing NPC's, use three different characteristic points. No
          more - otherwise it gets time consuming. Three is enough to make
          someone stand out (in ironclaw, four - race). :) You can fill in
          details if players request (taken from Roger Zelazny's hints for
          writers). In PBEM you can get more description in, but it's
          written...

          Be prepared to wing it. You can plan, plan, plan, and have a hundred
          different contingencies, and the players will STILL do something you
          didn't expect.

          Make life go on. If the players don't get involved in something, it
          goes on anyways, and the players will probably hear about the
          fallout.

          Make NPC's realistic. Some people take abuse. Some people don't,
          and will walk away, react poorly, whatever.

          Oh, there's a billion more, but that's a decent start.
        • Frank Sronce
          ... Hm. Well, I ll list off some common advice. 1) don t get too attached to your plotline. If the PCs do something that should change the way you expected
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 1, 2003
            captain_cohen wrote:
            > The only problem is, I tried DMing a DnD campaign once.
            >
            > There were three guys, one with a horse. I wanted to kill the horse,
            > so I made an encounter with wolves.
            >
            > Only the horse survived.
            >
            >
            > So what I"m looking for is someone to give me some tips from
            > experiance Hosting or dealing with Hosts and somesuch....
            >
            >
            > THank you.
            >
            > Samuel/Glenn/Bengaley/Captain_cohen/TNPE/Dodger


            Hm. Well, I'll list off some common advice.

            1) don't get too attached to your plotline. If the PCs do something that
            should change the way you expected stuff to go, let it change. When you
            basically overrule them and say "Well, you rolled a 12 but you fail
            anyway; the magic sceptre breaks," then the players might as well not
            show up.

            2) don't get too attached to any favorite NPCs. If you want to have an
            NPC member of the party, I recommend making them the feeble, comic
            relief character that the other PCs have to rescue. Avoid having them be
            "the amazingly skilled and powerful NPC who is concealing their true
            power but exists to make sure that the plot goes the way the GM wants it
            to." Those are really hard to pull off without annoying the players.
            Really hard.

            3) get feedback. If you want to dump a particular rule or make a special
            exception, I recommend _asking_ the players their opinion first. For
            example, especially with an inexperienced GM, I'd rather hear "Okay,
            Fred just took 8 wounds and would be killed outright, but I really don't
            want to kill off any PCs this early, especially when it was really my
            fault because I made the NPC elementalist too powerful. You just take 2
            wounds and are knocked out. Everyone okay with that?" than "Okay, Fred
            just got hit with 5d12 damage and botched his soak roll... um... you
            take 2 wounds. No, really. Just 2. No, you can't see the dice!"

            4) don't waste too much time pouring over the rulebook. If you can't
            find the grenade scatter rules, just follow #3, above... come up with a
            reasonable answer and make sure that no one really objects.

            5) if people object unreasonably, don't be afraid to overrule them.
            Sometimes you'll get players who just can't handle the GM doing anything
            that isn't exactly what the book says... or worse, anything that isn't
            covered by the rulebook at ALL. But if every player agrees that you're
            making a mistake, you ought to reconsider what you're doing.

            6) be VERY picky about what sort of characters you allow. NEVER allow
            the players complete and free rein to take any gift, any piece of
            equipment, or to use any magic list until AFTER you've got some
            experience. A very common mistake is for the novice GM to say, "Yeah,
            you can make any character you want," and they end up with really
            unbalanced or messed up characters. Beware of anyone who wants some
            power or ability and can't justify it in any way other than, "But an
            undead Blessed who knows Culture magic would be so COOL!"

            7) put a white mage or other healer in your party. Healing magic will
            make a big difference as to how "survivable" the game is, especially if
            it ends up being combat-heavy... and combat games are generally the
            easiest to run.

            Kiz
            --
            http://www.kizandjenn.com
          • susangray
            im just gld i wasnt the one tyo ask for advice :) also beginning a capaign in 1 weeks time ... From: Ted MacKinnon To: ironclaw@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday,
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 1, 2003
              im just gld i wasnt the one tyo ask for advice :)
              also beginning a capaign in 1 weeks time
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 6:37 PM
              Subject: [ironclaw] Re: Newbie Host tips? Anyone? Please?

              > 1) relax
              > 2) cheat (if the dice say that the mastiff's bite would do 5 wounds
              &
              > the character is not combat oriented - so low resolve & body, then
              > cheat & call it 2 wounds)

              My suggestion entirely.  Never let the dice rule the story.  Don't
              kill characters who have been smart up to this point, and because of
              the story, find themselves in hot spots.

              And don't roll in front of the players, or tell them you'll cheat to
              keep them alive.  If you do, never mention it.  Ever.  :)

              Now, if they're just plain dumb, well, they might get eaten.  But I,
              personally, usually give a warning (dead loved NPC, missing limb,
              that sort of thing).

              Be consistant with your house rules.  Be CAREFUL with your house
              rules.  Remember, you're setting a precedent.

              Talk to your players.  See what THEY think about a ruling.  Heck,
              you're all in it together, and anything they automatically say "Yes"
              to because it gives them a bonus also applies to villains.

              Be prepared to say, "Ooops, I screwed up."  Nothing is worse than a
              GM bound and determined to prove he was right, because he's the GM,
              darn it!

              Talk to the players more - find out what they want out of the
              campaign.  If you've planned an intrigue based campaign, it stinks to
              find out everyone has plans to make an atavist explorer...and worse,
              aren't interested in intrigue!

              To paraphrase and repeat - give the players a break.

              A new point - give the villains a brain.  They have motives.  Figure
              them out.  Very few people think they are in the wrong, or are
              EEEEvil.  So people usually have (in their own minds) a good reason
              for doing something nasty.

              Give your NPC's life, free will, and the ability to affect what's
              happening...but not too much.  NEVER allow an NPC to steal the show
              from the players.  Help, yes.  Cooperate, yes.  Steal the show?  THe
              players are the heroes.  Even if they are outclassed by the two
              battling wizards, make sure they know that if they didn't hold off
              the other wizard's army of goons, the good wizard they're working for
              would be fish food before he won the magical duel.

              A personal preference hint - do NOT have a 'pet npc' - you know, the
              one you'd play if you were a player?  Who's always with the party, an
              equal member?  Don't - either the pet NPC takes up the spotlight, or
              he does nothing, and isn't terribly exciting for you.  :)  Some
              people may disagree, but that's my opinion.

              When describing NPC's, use three different characteristic points.  No
              more - otherwise it gets time consuming.  Three is enough to make
              someone stand out (in ironclaw, four - race).  :)  You can fill in
              details if players request (taken from Roger Zelazny's hints for
              writers).  In PBEM you can get more description in, but it's
              written...

              Be prepared to wing it.  You can plan, plan, plan, and have a hundred
              different contingencies, and the players will STILL do something you
              didn't expect.

              Make life go on.  If the players don't get involved in something, it
              goes on anyways, and the players will probably hear about the
              fallout.

              Make NPC's realistic.  Some people take abuse.  Some people don't,
              and will walk away, react poorly, whatever. 

              Oh, there's a billion more, but that's a decent start.



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.