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[ironclaw] Pieces of Eight

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  • Kurt Miller
    Actually, the gold coins used in AD&D are ten gold pieces to the pound, which would give them a weight of approximately 1.6 ounces per coin. The gold piece
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1 2:23 AM
      Actually, the gold coins used in AD&D are ten gold pieces to the pound,
      which would give them a weight of approximately 1.6 ounces per coin. The
      gold piece (gp) is the standard unit of weight measurement, and all other
      coins are the same weight, i.e. a copper piece is the same weight as a gold
      piece, although being made of copper, the coin would be a bit bigger.
      Characters in AD&D often forget how much a gold piece really weighs; one of
      my favorite tricks as a DM was to have them slay a dragon or other powerful
      monster and find its hoard, which in the case of an ancient red dragon could
      amount to as much as a million gold pieces; unfortunately, this is 100,000
      pounds of gold coins, or fifty tons of gold! Once the players realize how
      much gold that is, I just sit back and watch the fun as the characters
      attempt to transport as much of it back to civilization as possible. By the
      way, a Bag of Holding only holds a few hundred pounds of loot and a Portable
      Hole contains just under 283 cubic feet, (being a circular 'hole' ten feet
      deep and six feet in diameter) and since there are approximately 100 gold
      pieces to the cubic foot, such a container would only hold about 28,000 GP.
      Of course, characters who go off in search of a mule train and return to the
      dragon's lair will no doubt find most of the gold missing unless they take
      special pains to conceal it...
      ...so what does this have to do with IRONCLAW?
      Well, assuming that an aureal is about a troy ounce of gold, the coin would
      be slightly smaller than an AD&D gold piece, so characters who carry around
      a large quantity of gold coins will have to worry about how to transport
      it--and in a society where thieves and cutpurses are common, such a hoard of
      gold coins would be a tempting target! Not to mention the fact that the more
      gold you carry around with you, the harder it becomes to conceal the money
      from those who wish to steal it. Better keep that money in a guild hall
      where it will be safe--until an enterprising group of thieves (i.e. player
      characters) decide to steal it!

      Kurt Miller
      'Speaker of the Law'
    • ZdeLameter@aol.com
      In a message dated 2000.06.01 02:22:14 Pacific Daylight Time, ... That s AD&D First Edition, Kurt. I think they changed it in second edition. Zeke
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1 7:17 AM
        In a message dated 2000.06.01 02:22:14 Pacific Daylight Time,
        godhi@... writes:

        > Actually, the gold coins used in AD&D are ten gold pieces to the pound,
        > which would give them a weight of approximately 1.6 ounces per coin.

        That's AD&D First Edition, Kurt. I think they changed it in second
        edition.

        Zeke
      • ZdeLameter@aol.com
        In a message dated 2000.06.01 02:22:14 Pacific Daylight Time, ... Portable ... No, no, no, no, no. Trust me, Your Obedient Serpent pulled out the Portable
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1 7:44 AM
          In a message dated 2000.06.01 02:22:14 Pacific Daylight Time,
          godhi@... writes:

          > By the
          > way, a Bag of Holding only holds a few hundred pounds of loot and a
          Portable
          > Hole contains just under 283 cubic feet, (being a circular 'hole' ten feet
          > deep and six feet in diameter) and since there are approximately 100 gold
          > pieces to the cubic foot, such a container would only hold about 28,000 GP.

          No, no, no, no, no. Trust me, Your Obedient Serpent pulled out the
          Portable Hoard, um, Hole often enough in your game to remember the numbers.

          Let's do this in metric, just to speed things up:

          A 6' x 10' Portable Hole is pretty close to 2 meters in diameter x 3
          meters deep. The volume of a cylinder of that dimensions is:
          = pi * the square of the radius * depth
          = 3.14 * (100 cm)^2 * 300 cm
          = 3.14 * 10,000 cm^2 * 300 cm
          = 9,420,000 cubic centimeters

          1 cc of water weighs approximately 1 gram, so the Hole can hold 9,420,000
          grams of water, or 9,420 kilograms -- close to ten tons.

          Gold has a Specific Gravity of 19.3 -- for the non-geeks out there, that
          means that a given volume of gold weighs 19.3 times the same volume of water.
          Lead only has an SG of about 11.3.

          If you could completely fill a Portable Hole with NOTHING but gold --
          melt those GPs down and use it as a mold for a ridiculously huge cylindrical
          ingot -- it would hold 181,806 kilograms of gold -- 181 metric tons, or about
          400,000 pounds, or a nice, round 4,000,000 "First Edition" GPs.

          Of course, that's not really practical -- but even assuming that you pack
          them so loosely that you have 75% waste space (and no true munchkin is ever
          THAT sloppy), that million-GP hoard fits in there happily.

          I know I did these numbers for you during the Corongond game -- I was
          SUCH a munchkin. How do you think Erbec managed to amass such an impressive
          hoard?

          And, okay, that was SERIOUSLY off-topic.

          Zeke
          aka Lados
          aka Erbec

          More later...
        • Charles Roe
          Actually, if you wanna be semi-historical about it, penny coins were generally around 10% of an ounce, as I recall... Silver is rated at about $25 an ounce,
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 1 1:19 PM
            Actually, if you wanna be semi-historical about it, penny coins were
            generally around 10% of an ounce, as I recall... Silver is rated at
            about $25 an ounce, last I heard, which would make a denar equal to
            around $2.50 in our currency... And the aureal would then be worth
            $60, assuming it is also 1/10 of an ounce... By the way, 24 to 1 is
            actually what the relative values of Gold and Silver ARE right
            now... So, it would take 2240 coins to weigh one stone... Or, more
            useful, 560 coins equals 1/4 stone, since that's how the character
            sheet has you mark Encumbrance... For simplicity, I suppose you
            could say 500 coins is 1/4 stone, 1000 is 1/2, and 2000 coins would
            be a full stone... This would make the coins average 11.2% of an
            ounce, though, or about 9 to the ounce... The denar would be more
            like $2.80, then, and the areal almost $70, to help come up with
            prices for things on the fly if you have to...
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