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Question about an upcoming con

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  • azereaux
    Say, I was wondering: I know it s only a minor con in its second year, but are there any plans for the upcoming Furry Fiesta in February in Dallas? Figured it
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 8, 2009
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      Say, I was wondering: I know it's only a minor con in its second year, but are there any plans for the upcoming Furry Fiesta in February in Dallas? Figured it couldn't hurt to ask, right?
    • Sanguine Marketing
      no body has asked about hosting games at Furry Fiesta Con. Plus, I having trouble getting Jason to respond to my previous Con request. So the situation looks
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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        no body has asked about hosting games at Furry Fiesta Con. Plus, I having trouble getting Jason to respond to my previous Con request. So the situation looks slim to none.

        On Tue, Dec 8, 2009 at 3:38 PM, azereaux <g_hackwrench@...> wrote:
         

        Say, I was wondering: I know it's only a minor con in its second year, but are there any plans for the upcoming Furry Fiesta in February in Dallas? Figured it couldn't hurt to ask, right?




        --
        Cordially,

        Chuan Lin
        Sanguine Marketing

        Sanguine Productions Limited
        2692 Madison Road 1-PMB-279
        Rookwood Pavilion, Suite N1
        Cincinnati, OH  45208-1320

        Telephone and Fax: 312 803 1961
        Website: http://www.sanguine.com


      • John W Patterson IV
        Darn.... Still curious, though. What does it take to host a game at a con? I know it s kind of a dumb question, but... well, I ve never been to a con before,
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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          Darn....

          Still curious, though. What does it take to host a game at a con? I know it's kind of a dumb question, but... well, I've never been to a con before, and the closest I've been to this sort of thing is participating in a D&D Game Day thing a few years back.



          _______________________________________________
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        • Henry Thiel
          Generally, getting in touch with whomever is in charge of the conventions Gaming track, and saying you d like to run an event. If you re not certain or there s
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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            Generally, getting in touch with whomever is in charge of the conventions Gaming track, and saying you'd like to run an event. If you're not certain or there's nobody specified, contact whomever is in charge of their Programming. They'll walk you through waht needs doing.

            Generally, they'll ask when you want to do it, and for how long. They'll work with what they've got to make it fit, if they dont' already have someone doing something.

            /Former Gaming lead for Califur

            On Wed, Dec 9, 2009 at 8:43 AM, John W Patterson IV <g_hackwrench@...> wrote:
             

            Darn....

            Still curious, though. What does it take to host a game at a con? I know it's kind of a dumb question, but... well, I've never been to a con before, and the closest I've been to this sort of thing is participating in a D&D Game Day thing a few years back.



            _______________________________________________
            May Our Lady of the Workshop bless your every endeavor!



            Windows Live Hotmail gives you a free,exclusive gift. Click here to download.

          • Sean L. McLane
            ... All it really takes is someone who is dedicated enough to prepare a game to run, and a place to do so. The first part involves a bit more than one might
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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              > From: John W Patterson IV <g_hackwrench@...>
              > Subject: RE: [ironclaw] Question about an upcoming con
              >
              > Darn....=20
              >
              > Still curious, though. What does it take to host a game at a con? I know it=
              > 's kind of a dumb question, but... well, I've never been to a con before, a=
              > nd the closest I've been to this sort of thing is participating in a D&D Ga=
              > me Day thing a few years back.=20
              >

              All it really takes is someone who is dedicated enough to prepare a game to
              run, and a place to do so.

              The first part involves a bit more than one might think. Are you going to
              generate characters there, or provide pre-generated characters? Will you let
              someone bring in their own character that they've made based on their own
              persona? You will need to provide materials in any case, either blank
              character sheets, or the filled out ones. If you're going to pre-generate
              the characters, use some computer program to make the file. Trust me, it's
              better for all involved.

              If you're generating characters right there, keep in mind that the character
              generation process can take some time, as people who are new to the game will
              have lots of questions, and will want to pore over the lists of races, gifts,
              flaws, and skills endlessly before making a decision.

              Pre-generated characters are quicker to start adventuring off the block, and
              can come with the bonus that the characters have a reason to stick together.

              You will also need to bring extra pencils, and extra dice. Not everyone will
              have these. Spare paper can't hurt either.

              Then comes the second item I mentioned above. Not all conventions are gamer
              friendly. They may not understand the needs for running a RPG. If they do,
              that's great. However, space is a premium at a lot of cons, and they may
              decide that something that's not a REAL part of the fandom, like gaming (this
              is a direct quote I once heard) doesn't deserve any actual space. Be sure
              they at least have a table AND CHAIRS set up for you, preferably out of main
              traffic flow. Having people watch your game is nice, but being constantly
              bumped by fursuiters and over-sized art portfolios can be a pain.

              If you're really lucky, the convention of choice will have an actual gaming
              track, with a room dedicated just to playing games. (Bonus if they recognize
              that table-top games and video games are two different things entirely and
              work best in separate rooms... I've attended a con where these two were just
              lumped together as 'gaming' and had to share the space)

              Really good cons will provide some kind of compensation for people who run
              games at their convention, whether it be a discount off the badge, or credit
              toward the following year's badge. This is less likely in smaller cons, though.

              In any case, if you have a game scheduled at a con, be sure to show up on
              time, and be ready to play. 'Furry Time' is an amusing concept, but it's rude
              to your players if you are late.

              I could keep going on and on, but I think I've made my point. If you couldn't
              tell, I've run games at a con or two.

              -Sean, CI
            • Arlene Medder
              Sean has good advice. I d also have a brief common tests page and an intro prepared of what information you want your players to know. That includes things
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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                Sean has good advice. I'd also have a brief 'common tests' page and an
                intro prepared of what information you want your players to know.

                That includes things like, dice mechanics, 30-second history of setting
                that you're using (no need to cover Bruges, if the adventure is set in
                Triskellian), 30-45 seconds of 'information your character knows' (which
                includes food sources - your fellow characters ARE NOT food), and the intro
                the adventure itself.

                If you don't have multiple copies of the book, be prepared to pass it
                around a lot. When you get to the con, if there is a dealer's room, check
                to see if there are any copies there (so you can refer players to the
                dealers).

                Have 1 set of dice out to show what the different die sizes are. When the
                game attendees are not avid gamers, they may not be able to eyeball the
                difference between a d10 & d8.

                Arlene
                On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 12:03:28 -0500 (EST), "Sean L. McLane"
                <zodo@...> wrote:
                >> From: John W Patterson IV <g_hackwrench@...>
                >> Subject: RE: [ironclaw] Question about an upcoming con
                >>
                >> Darn....=20
                >>
                >> Still curious, though. What does it take to host a game at a con? I know
                >> it=
                >> 's kind of a dumb question, but... well, I've never been to a con
                before,
                >> a=
                >> nd the closest I've been to this sort of thing is participating in a D&D
                >> Ga=
                >> me Day thing a few years back.=20
                >>
                >
                > All it really takes is someone who is dedicated enough to prepare a game
                to
                > run, and a place to do so.
                >
                > The first part involves a bit more than one might think. Are you going to

                > generate characters there, or provide pre-generated characters? Will you
                > let
                > someone bring in their own character that they've made based on their own
                > persona? You will need to provide materials in any case, either blank
                > character sheets, or the filled out ones. If you're going to pre-generate
                > the characters, use some computer program to make the file. Trust me,
                it's
                > better for all involved.
                >
                > If you're generating characters right there, keep in mind that the
                > character
                > generation process can take some time, as people who are new to the game
                > will
                > have lots of questions, and will want to pore over the lists of races,
                > gifts,
                > flaws, and skills endlessly before making a decision.
                >
                > Pre-generated characters are quicker to start adventuring off the block,
                > and
                > can come with the bonus that the characters have a reason to stick
                > together.
                >
                > You will also need to bring extra pencils, and extra dice. Not everyone
                > will
                > have these. Spare paper can't hurt either.
                >
                > Then comes the second item I mentioned above. Not all conventions are
                gamer
                > friendly. They may not understand the needs for running a RPG. If they
                do,
                > that's great. However, space is a premium at a lot of cons, and they may
                > decide that something that's not a REAL part of the fandom, like gaming
                > (this
                > is a direct quote I once heard) doesn't deserve any actual space. Be sure

                > they at least have a table AND CHAIRS set up for you, preferably out of
                > main
                > traffic flow. Having people watch your game is nice, but being constantly

                > bumped by fursuiters and over-sized art portfolios can be a pain.
                >
                > If you're really lucky, the convention of choice will have an actual
                gaming
                > track, with a room dedicated just to playing games. (Bonus if they
                > recognize
                > that table-top games and video games are two different things entirely
                and
                > work best in separate rooms... I've attended a con where these two were
                > just
                > lumped together as 'gaming' and had to share the space)
                >
                > Really good cons will provide some kind of compensation for people who
                run
                > games at their convention, whether it be a discount off the badge, or
                > credit
                > toward the following year's badge. This is less likely in smaller cons,
                > though.
                >
                > In any case, if you have a game scheduled at a con, be sure to show up on
                > time, and be ready to play. 'Furry Time' is an amusing concept, but it's
                > rude
                > to your players if you are late.
                >
                > I could keep going on and on, but I think I've made my point. If you
                > couldn't
                > tell, I've run games at a con or two.
                >
                > -Sean, CI
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                --
                Arlene J Medder
              • Kevin Clark
                Arlene s got the right of it, re: common tests. And not just when you re hosting at a convention. In fact, I think there s a GM screen in the files folder
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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                  Arlene's got the right of it, re: common tests.  And not just when you're hosting at a convention.
                  In fact, I think there's a GM screen in the files folder listing such things.

                  On Wed, Dec 9, 2009 at 1:41 PM, Arlene Medder <ajmedder@...> wrote:
                   


                  Sean has good advice. I'd also have a brief 'common tests' page and an
                  intro prepared of what information you want your players to know.

                  That includes things like, dice mechanics, 30-second history of setting
                  that you're using (no need to cover Bruges, if the adventure is set in
                  Triskellian), 30-45 seconds of 'information your character knows' (which
                  includes food sources - your fellow characters ARE NOT food), and the intro
                  the adventure itself.

                  If you don't have multiple copies of the book, be prepared to pass it
                  around a lot. When you get to the con, if there is a dealer's room, check
                  to see if there are any copies there (so you can refer players to the
                  dealers).

                  Have 1 set of dice out to show what the different die sizes are. When the
                  game attendees are not avid gamers, they may not be able to eyeball the
                  difference between a d10 & d8.

                  Arlene


                  On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 12:03:28 -0500 (EST), "Sean L. McLane"
                  <zodo@...> wrote:
                  >> From: John W Patterson IV <g_hackwrench@...>
                  >> Subject: RE: [ironclaw] Question about an upcoming con
                  >>
                  >> Darn....=20
                  >>
                  >> Still curious, though. What does it take to host a game at a con? I know
                  >> it=
                  >> 's kind of a dumb question, but... well, I've never been to a con
                  before,
                  >> a=
                  >> nd the closest I've been to this sort of thing is participating in a D&D
                  >> Ga=
                  >> me Day thing a few years back.=20
                  >>
                  >
                  > All it really takes is someone who is dedicated enough to prepare a game
                  to
                  > run, and a place to do so.
                  >
                  > The first part involves a bit more than one might think. Are you going to

                  > generate characters there, or provide pre-generated characters? Will you
                  > let
                  > someone bring in their own character that they've made based on their own
                  > persona? You will need to provide materials in any case, either blank
                  > character sheets, or the filled out ones. If you're going to pre-generate
                  > the characters, use some computer program to make the file. Trust me,
                  it's
                  > better for all involved.
                  >
                  > If you're generating characters right there, keep in mind that the
                  > character
                  > generation process can take some time, as people who are new to the game
                  > will
                  > have lots of questions, and will want to pore over the lists of races,
                  > gifts,
                  > flaws, and skills endlessly before making a decision.
                  >
                  > Pre-generated characters are quicker to start adventuring off the block,
                  > and
                  > can come with the bonus that the characters have a reason to stick
                  > together.
                  >
                  > You will also need to bring extra pencils, and extra dice. Not everyone
                  > will
                  > have these. Spare paper can't hurt either.
                  >
                  > Then comes the second item I mentioned above. Not all conventions are
                  gamer
                  > friendly. They may not understand the needs for running a RPG. If they
                  do,
                  > that's great. However, space is a premium at a lot of cons, and they may
                  > decide that something that's not a REAL part of the fandom, like gaming
                  > (this
                  > is a direct quote I once heard) doesn't deserve any actual space. Be sure

                  > they at least have a table AND CHAIRS set up for you, preferably out of
                  > main
                  > traffic flow. Having people watch your game is nice, but being constantly

                  > bumped by fursuiters and over-sized art portfolios can be a pain.
                  >
                  > If you're really lucky, the convention of choice will have an actual
                  gaming
                  > track, with a room dedicated just to playing games. (Bonus if they
                  > recognize
                  > that table-top games and video games are two different things entirely
                  and
                  > work best in separate rooms... I've attended a con where these two were
                  > just
                  > lumped together as 'gaming' and had to share the space)
                  >
                  > Really good cons will provide some kind of compensation for people who
                  run
                  > games at their convention, whether it be a discount off the badge, or
                  > credit
                  > toward the following year's badge. This is less likely in smaller cons,
                  > though.
                  >
                  > In any case, if you have a game scheduled at a con, be sure to show up on
                  > time, and be ready to play. 'Furry Time' is an amusing concept, but it's
                  > rude
                  > to your players if you are late.
                  >
                  > I could keep going on and on, but I think I've made my point. If you
                  > couldn't
                  > tell, I've run games at a con or two.
                  >
                  > -Sean, CI
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  --
                  Arlene J Medder


                • Sean L. McLane
                  ... I can attest that the GM screen is a good thing to have. -Sean, CI
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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                    > From: Kevin Clark <tarotmage2008@...>
                    > Subject: Re: [ironclaw] Question about an upcoming con
                    >
                    > Arlene's got the right of it, re: common tests. And not just when you're
                    > hosting at a convention.
                    > In fact, I think there's a GM screen in the files folder listing such
                    > things.
                    >

                    I can attest that the GM screen is a good thing to have.

                    -Sean, CI
                  • jconall
                    IT also can;t hurt to have a 1 page glossary of important terms places with a copy for everyone. Just the very basics (names of the town and country you are
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 10, 2009
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                      IT also can;t hurt to have a 1 page "glossary" of important terms places with a copy for everyone. Just the very basics (names of the town and country you are in, Reeling, Soak, etc.) just enought for 1 page at about 16 size font. It will help reduce questions and give you more time for gaming.

                      --- In ironclaw@yahoogroups.com, "Sean L. McLane" <zodo@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > From: Kevin Clark <tarotmage2008@...>
                      > > Subject: Re: [ironclaw] Question about an upcoming con
                      > >
                      > > Arlene's got the right of it, re: common tests. And not just when you're
                      > > hosting at a convention.
                      > > In fact, I think there's a GM screen in the files folder listing such
                      > > things.
                      > >
                      >
                      > I can attest that the GM screen is a good thing to have.
                      >
                      > -Sean, CI
                      >
                    • Chris 'Feli' Pilgrim
                      ... Agreed on this. Making sure that the game can start quickly, and without too much tutorial time before/during the game can really make or break the game at
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 13, 2010
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                        On Thu, Dec 10, 2009 at 10:09 AM, jconall <splunge42@...> wrote:
                         

                        IT also can;t hurt to have a 1 page "glossary" of important terms places with a copy for everyone. Just the very basics (names of the town and country you are in, Reeling, Soak, etc.) just enought for 1 page at about 16 size font. It will help reduce questions and give you more time for gaming.

                         
                        Agreed on this. Making sure that the game can start quickly, and without too much tutorial time before/during the game can really make or break the game at a convention. You want to keep things simple, yet give latitude to people playing.
                         
                        As a side point, if you're GMing the game... be prepared to make allowances for the players straying way off the path you want them on.
                         
                        Feli
                        --
                        Chris "Feli" Pilgrim
                        Chairperson, What The Fur
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