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RE: [insulinomadogs] Lily update

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  • Jackie Webb
    Fingers and toes crossed that everything goes well! Jackie (Australia-
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 1, 2010
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      Fingers and toes crossed that everything goes well!


      Jackie
      (Australia->
      > Things with Lilygirl have gotten complicated and we're facing surgery tomorrow. Ultrasound and CTs have confirmed a new mass associated with her cecum. This may or may not be another insulinoma, but at least they can deal with all of it in the same surgery. We're very hopeful that removing the liver tumor and exploring the pancreas will buy some valuable time. Thanks to you all for sharing your knowledge. I will continue to learn from you as we enter this next phase. It's always a new hurdle.
      >
      >

    • Kris K.
      And here also! Good luck, Lily! Postivie healing thoughts, Kris in FL ... And here also! Good luck, Lily! Postivie healing thoughts, Kris in FL From: Jackie
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 1, 2010
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        And here also! Good luck, Lily!
         
        Postivie healing thoughts,
        Kris in FL

        From: Jackie Webb <mightyspider@...>
        To: insulinoma dogs <insulinomadogs@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wed, September 1, 2010 5:08:11 AM
        Subject: RE: [insulinomadogs] Lily update

         

        Fingers and toes crossed that everything goes well!


        Jackie
        (Australia->


      • iteachurkid
        Hope today went well. Praying for and thinking about you and Lily!
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 1, 2010
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          Hope today went well. Praying for and thinking about you and Lily!

          --- In insulinomadogs@yahoogroups.com, "tulsascott69" <tulsascott@...> wrote:
          >
          > Things with Lilygirl have gotten complicated and we're facing surgery tomorrow. Ultrasound and CTs have confirmed a new mass associated with her cecum. This may or may not be another insulinoma, but at least they can deal with all of it in the same surgery. We're very hopeful that removing the liver tumor and exploring the pancreas will buy some valuable time. Thanks to you all for sharing your knowledge. I will continue to learn from you as we enter this next phase. It's always a new hurdle.
          >
        • tulsascott69
          Thought I d check in with a couple questions about Lily the Aussie who is now seven months post-surgery. She had some hypo-free months through the Winter but
          Message 4 of 11 , May 28, 2011
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            Thought I'd check in with a couple questions about Lily the Aussie who is now seven months post-surgery. She had some hypo-free months through the Winter but has now developed a pattern of getting an episode after the first feeding in the mornings. We have not fed her during the night and her last feeding in the evening is at 9:00. Would an additional meal @ 2 am keep her from having this early morning hypoglycemia? She is on both diazoxide and prednisone. None of her subsequent daily feedings induces an episode. Anyone else have this experience?

            I'm also needing some feedback on a chemotherapy my vet is suggesting. The drug is called streptozocin and targets the insulin producing cells in an effort to acheive normoglycemia. Some dogs develop diabetes but can be managed. Does anyone have experience with this drug? I've not seen it discussed on the board. Any input would be appreciated.

            Lily, diagnosed 05.2010 surgery 09.2010
          • Jackie Webb
            The reason I ended up putting Jamie on Pred was that he started having hypos after breakfast in the morning. But since Lily is on Pred already the only thing
            Message 5 of 11 , May 30, 2011
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              The reason I ended up putting Jamie on Pred was that he started having hypos after breakfast in the morning.  But since Lily is on Pred already the only thing I might suggest is to up the morning dose.  A 2am feed might be better for her though, if you can handle getting up at that time.
               
              I haven't heard of that drug, hopefully someone else here has.  Great that your vet is looking around for alternatives!


              Jackie
              (Australia-

              1a. Lily update
              Posted by: "tulsascott69" tulsascott@... tulsascott69
              Date: Sat May 28, 2011 4:03 pm ((PDT))

              Thought I'd check in with a couple questions about Lily the Aussie who is now seven months post-surgery. She had some hypo-free months through the Winter but has now developed a pattern of getting an episode after the first feeding in the mornings. We have not fed her during the night and her last feeding in the evening is at 9:00. Would an additional meal @ 2 am keep her from having this early morning hypoglycemia? She is on both diazoxide and prednisone. None of her subsequent daily feedings induces an episode. Anyone else have this experience?

              I'm also needing some feedback on a chemotherapy my vet is suggesting. The drug is called streptozocin and targets the insulin producing cells in an effort to acheive normoglycemia. Some dogs develop diabetes but can be managed. Does anyone have experience with this drug? I've not seen it discussed on the board. Any input would be appreciated.

              Lily, diagnosed 05.2010 surgery 09.2010


            • madamerose54
              Hi, As many of us know, frequent feeding is a critical part of the management of our dogs with insulinoma - standard is small meals every 4 hours and many of
              Message 6 of 11 , May 30, 2011
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                Hi,
                As many of us know, frequent feeding is a critical part of the management of our dogs with insulinoma - standard is small meals every 4 hours and many of us use various forms of automatic feeders so we dont have to wake up all night long.
                We have found that the 2 meal pop-up feeder is inexpensive and works perfectly for our 1 am and 5 am meals and our Sami wakes up as soon as she hears it pop open
                http://www.petsafe.net/Products/Feed-and-Water-Systems/Automatic/2-Meal-Pet-Feeder.aspx

                Regarding the streptozocin, this drug was used approximately 40 years ago experimentally to induce diabetes by destroying the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. It was toxic and found no use in mainstream human medicine. I was not not aware that it was being used for animals, but hopefully a vet tech or other individual will respond back with some information.
                Keep us posted and hang in there - with proper feeding and medications hopefully Lily's condition can be stabilized.
                Gary
                Sami - diagnosed Feb 2010, surgery April 2010 - on pred, diazoxide, pepcid and high dose B-vitamins.

                --- In insulinomadogs@yahoogroups.com, "tulsascott69" <tulsascott@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thought I'd check in with a couple questions about Lily the Aussie who is now seven months post-surgery. She had some hypo-free months through the Winter but has now developed a pattern of getting an episode after the first feeding in the mornings. We have not fed her during the night and her last feeding in the evening is at 9:00. Would an additional meal @ 2 am keep her from having this early morning hypoglycemia? She is on both diazoxide and prednisone. None of her subsequent daily feedings induces an episode. Anyone else have this experience?
                >
                > I'm also needing some feedback on a chemotherapy my vet is suggesting. The drug is called streptozocin and targets the insulin producing cells in an effort to acheive normoglycemia. Some dogs develop diabetes but can be managed. Does anyone have experience with this drug? I've not seen it discussed on the board. Any input would be appreciated.
                >
                > Lily, diagnosed 05.2010 surgery 09.2010
                >
              • catsmeat
                Hi I m just catching up on the forum. You were asking about Streptozotocin, as far as I am aware no one on this forum has tried it. It is mentioned on page
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 5, 2011
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                  Hi
                  I'm just catching up on the forum. You were asking about Streptozotocin, as far as I am aware no one on this forum has tried it. It is mentioned on page 10 in the Minnosotta paper "Dog Insulinoma" on the Links page and they say
                  "Streptozotocin, a drug with antineoplastic activity against islet cells, has been used in 2 cases of metastatic insulinomas in dogs.93, 94 It was highly nephrotoxic in these two animals, and further investigations are needed before it can be recommended for clinical use in the dog."
                  re the hypos in the morning, it has been reported that some dogs get an insulin spike after eating, so perhaps this is what is happening with Lilly. Perhaps this could be managed by you knowing what time this is going to happen after eating and making sure that she is kept very quiet during this time to prevent her using up what little glucose she has. Or a very small snack on waking, and a little bit more an hour later??
                  Good luck

                  --- In insulinomadogs@yahoogroups.com, "madamerose54" <madamerose54@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi,
                  > As many of us know, frequent feeding is a critical part of the management of our dogs with insulinoma - standard is small meals every 4 hours and many of us use various forms of automatic feeders so we dont have to wake up all night long.
                  > We have found that the 2 meal pop-up feeder is inexpensive and works perfectly for our 1 am and 5 am meals and our Sami wakes up as soon as she hears it pop open
                  > http://www.petsafe.net/Products/Feed-and-Water-Systems/Automatic/2-Meal-Pet-Feeder.aspx
                  >
                  > Regarding the streptozocin, this drug was used approximately 40 years ago experimentally to induce diabetes by destroying the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. It was toxic and found no use in mainstream human medicine. I was not not aware that it was being used for animals, but hopefully a vet tech or other individual will respond back with some information.
                  > Keep us posted and hang in there - with proper feeding and medications hopefully Lily's condition can be stabilized.
                  > Gary
                  > Sami - diagnosed Feb 2010, surgery April 2010 - on pred, diazoxide, pepcid and high dose B-vitamins.
                  >
                  > --- In insulinomadogs@yahoogroups.com, "tulsascott69" <tulsascott@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Thought I'd check in with a couple questions about Lily the Aussie who is now seven months post-surgery. She had some hypo-free months through the Winter but has now developed a pattern of getting an episode after the first feeding in the mornings. We have not fed her during the night and her last feeding in the evening is at 9:00. Would an additional meal @ 2 am keep her from having this early morning hypoglycemia? She is on both diazoxide and prednisone. None of her subsequent daily feedings induces an episode. Anyone else have this experience?
                  > >
                  > > I'm also needing some feedback on a chemotherapy my vet is suggesting. The drug is called streptozocin and targets the insulin producing cells in an effort to acheive normoglycemia. Some dogs develop diabetes but can be managed. Does anyone have experience with this drug? I've not seen it discussed on the board. Any input would be appreciated.
                  > >
                  > > Lily, diagnosed 05.2010 surgery 09.2010
                  > >
                  >
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