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19Fw: Texas and U.S. Nuclear transport issues

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  • Violet Jones
    Jun 17, 2002
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      from a newsgroup member:

       

       Hello All,

      Legislation for nuclear issues has been a hot item in west Texas as small towns are beginning to just say no to the transport and storage of nuclear materials.  Nationwide, legislation will be decided on in the Senate in less than 30 days (as of June 14, 2002).  Are you aware of these issues and are you willing to see the connections to terrorism opportunities or a cover up of what is already taking place similiar to a quiet genocide?  Are you aware of the money connections to Bush in the 1990's to the Texas and U.S. nuclear issues?  See the below resource information.

      In the late 1990's before the U.S. was to go to war with Bosnia, I was hearing a KOOP 91.7 FM talk show relate that Bosnia had been in  a planned path for an oil pipeline from Europe to Russia.  Later in 2001 I got an email from the Texas Trade Coalition relating that in the 1997 Congressional record Congress had been told of a plan for Afghanistan to be part of an oil pipeline, provided that that country could have a "recognized government".  You can get on their email list for news on such issues as the Fast Track legislation, oil and gmo (genetically modified organisms) and other issues by emailing Jere at jerel@... )  Also during that radio show I overheard another curious thing...that there was nuclear waste being trucked back and forth between Europe and Russia, from Russia to go to a European waste site, but Europe refused to take it and so forth.  This see saw activity went on until finally a "terrorist" got the nuclear material in  a road incident.   I smell a drill, uh something fishy... As we read up on nuclear issues think about the following questions:
      Where does your drinking water, including the bottled water and the town water towers, come  from? 

      What are the connections of the contaminated sources to your community and others, such as the food produced on farms or ranches outside of your area that may be affected from the water used on crops, or nearby highway or train accidents? 

      Include rivers as sources that are used as dumping grounds by industry, including nuclear power plants. There is also the selling of recycled materials contaminated with radiation, such as metals, computers that were in a spill, etc. that can end up in factories and resale places. In listenning to one fellow on m2ktalk.com I heard he had taken a geiger counter to the grocery store and got some readings.  He noted there is the irradiation of foods where over radiation may occur.

      Where are the roads and railways that will be used to transport the radioactive materials?

      What happens to university and industrial laboratory experiments with radioactive elements used?

      Here are some recent developments on the nuclear issues in the U.S. and Texas:

      Texas: www.andrewsnuclearwastedump.org   (Note: This organization even has the maps for the roads that will be used in Texas, and connections to U.S. road issues with nuclear as well.  There is even the usuall bad police tactics with recent arrest of activists to consider. Notice the connections to the below U.S. issues.)

      U.S.: http://www.citizen.org/pressroom/release.cfm?ID=1133  June 14, 2002 earthquake endangers the proposed nuclear dumping site. This is a known earthquake zone and is possibly able to contaminate the drinkable underground water aquifer.

      http://gristmagazine.com/forward.pl?forward_id=202  Recent issues of transport of plutonium that could start this weekend from Colorado to South Carolina to fuel nuclear reactors.

      http://www.gristmagazine.com/dearme/swain061002.asp?source=ecofund  This link can reinforce the link to industry and our water sources (possibly to the farm lands and municipal water sources?).

      http://nuclearneighborhoods.org/coalition/adtest13/   This is an action site to alert your legislators.  Note the statistics and dangers in the notice on this site of highway and train transportation of nuclear materials could result in the death of thousands. You can imagine that driving conditions and drivers can create at least a probability of so many accidents per year, on your major or minor highways. Check your local area about where hazardous waste can be shipped on what roads. See below:

      www.takeactioncenter.org   This is a mixture of issues, including the nuclear transport.  What I find important to add is the notice that these transports will be going by our schools and neighborhoods. Also, it is interesting to see the constant pressures of oil, drugs, environmental destruction of lands, and nuclear on the same site.

      www.rollingthunder.org  This is a very important activity nationwide that I urge us to participate in when it comes to your area, or go to the areas it is being held in.  I am sorry if you don't like the environmental and other slants, but please don't shoot the messanger in that these are patriots in their own way.  We need to stop putting each other down, vulconizing ourselves, when we need to teach one another and see each other's information and resources to work with for a stronger U.S. and other free nations in this world.  The real environmentalists know a boot licker and tie straightenner, or are aware of infiltrators to their causes by unethical groups, and have to do as any patriot should and try to judge only in a righteous manner.  Get involved, and besides, the one in Texas was a whole lot of fun for the kids as well.  Even the kids had their own "soapbox" with a portable radio station powered by a bicycle peddaled by kids. Adults often say "I wish I had their energy".  Let's use their energy for a good cause, and educate them as parents while we can.  Just a note that there was a lot of literature, free Ben and Jerry's  ice cream for those who got active, and more in the Austin event this year.

      Put your two cents in at these meets and help to bridge the information gaps. When I mentioned the information of Alex Jone's videos about the financial issues of the government budgets and the connections , a mental light went on in that meeting room for some activists, and they realized that it made sense due to their experiences matching up with it.  These meetings are think tanks and action groups, not couch potato groups.

      In the last meeting I went to I found that the background radiation was being artificially raised, and the old geiger counters were not set at the new ratings, which are set at a higher amount to fool the public into thinking that the current ratings are normal.  Texas has a lot of issues that need to be investigated with the clay areas being mined in Texas for the uranium in it.  Talk to the folks at www.citizen.org  in Austin about it.   Also, learn about the dangers of the so called low level radiation that could be in the steel in your new car bumper, or even plastics in computers and such.  Food irradiation is also an important issue that masks health and safety issues because of the radiation and the industry practices.  (See: www.citizen.org/cmep/index.cfm  )

      Austin has 2 nuclear power plants at the University of Texas to consider in future issues.  Back in the 1980's I was approached by 2 women who were concerned about the radiation levels built up in the creek, especially around the sandbanks where the radiation collects more according to them.  This creek goes through a public park where children play, next t o the police dept. and hospital and 6th street hotels and on into the river downstream where folks have recreational boating and events at the  Town Lake area, and upstream from the dam at Pleasant Valley road.  They mentioned a study they had seen that was covered up.  Also, this year I heard from some activists that during the 1960's there was a test to release radiation steam next to the math building in Austin.  There are probably more issues such as what happens to the test animals that are radioactive that were in the dumpster in the parking lot? They were also concerned about the real effects of the legal limits of laboratories in the entire Austin area being allowed to put a test tube full of radioactive liquid down the drain, per day, multiplied by how many laboratories there were in Austin schools and industry, perhaps enough to fill a swimming pool a day?  Back in the 1980's I contacted the health dept. and in letting them know of the girl's concerns, since they were afraid of being black balled,  the man asked me if this was the Duval spill.  Makes you wonder.  I have lost track of the two girls and don't know where to find them, much less their names now, but I stay away from the creek and nick name Red River street to be called Rad River.  Where is the Radio Active Ranger that ran for city council some years ago when you need him? 

      I want to dedicate these messages on radiation issues to a dear friend and activist, the late Susan Lee Campbell Solar, who ran for Texas governor when Bush was elected, and was so instrumental in saving us from earlier attempts by the nuclear industry to put nuclear dumps in Texas. She had invited the congress men and women of Mexico to speak in Austin to stop the border dumping area, and they were successful.  That was around the time the smoke from Mexico had darkenned our Texas skies enough to alert the city to keep the kids indoors.  One of the congressmen that lived in the area of the fires had been shot bording the plane to come as I recall them mentioning.  I remember her van museum on nuclear issues that included a pictures from the Three Mile Island incident showing a still born two headed calf, and mutated flowers in that area.  I appreciate her gift to us of knowledge of the issues faced then and now for the native Americans who were led to work in the Uranium mines, and their plight to preserve native plants and heritages, in spite of the government bulldozers to take out the plants just like the buffalo against the Indians.  I appreciate her bringing the information of low level radiation materials being allowed in things such as jewlry and other items, and the illnesses such as breast and uterine cancer,  and prostate cancer in areas around the nuclear energy areas.  She died this Febuary of pneumonia, from working herself too hard as an activist to stop nuclear dumping in the Andrews site in Texas.  Don't let your fellow Texans and U.S. citizens down, honor Susan's timeless contributions, and those of other hard working activists with your own involvements. Let's survive and make a brighter future for generations to come. Get active in your community.

      Tracy