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Wilma

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  • Jurydoctor@aol.com
    You are right. The entire issue revolves around causation. amy In a message dated 2/25/2006 8:42:07 AM Eastern Standard Time, infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 25, 2006
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      You are right. The entire issue revolves around causation.
      amy

      In a message dated 2/25/2006 8:42:07 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com writes:
      think a point that might be stressed here is that she was sent home
      and did not die for a day or so from the onset of the symptoms.

      While it is not provable one way or the other that the injury would
      have been mortal if she had been examined correctly, diagnosed
      correctly and a determination of treatment make based on the evidence
      from those finding, it IS 100% demonstrable that the injury WAS fatal
      when undiagnosed and untreated. The same medics that flubbed the exam
      should NOT be relied upon to judege whether or not her condition was
      GOING to be fatal IF it had been treated ... In a case where a LACK of
      treatment may or may not have been an indirect case of the fatality,
      the Patient ALWAYS deserves the benefit of the doubt. Had the
      diagnosis been complete and correct, with a finding that the cause was
      at that time -untreatable- the there would not BE a case or cause for
      negligence or malpractice..

      Please let me know how it goes ... my Step Father (not retired from
      medicine) was an ER doc for 35 years.. I have not run this past him,
      but I believe he would feel the same way I do, after all, I learned
      medical ethics and sound practice and procedures from him....


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