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shoplifting charges

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  • Melinda
    what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 20, 2005
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      what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest
    • dr.hawaii
      Melinda: I m not an attorney, and this isn t legal advice. From my experiences watching Judge Judy and The People s Court , as well as my experiences in
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 20, 2005
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        Melinda:

        I'm not an attorney, and this isn't legal advice.
        From my experiences watching "Judge Judy" and "The
        People's Court", as well as my experiences in court, a
        "no contest" plea is equivalent to a "guilty" verdict
        on your criminal record. What the "no contest" plea
        does is allow the defendant to plead guilty without
        having to be judged by a jury or the judge if there is
        no jury. In most cases the judge will be more lenient
        on the defendant if a "no contest" plea is entered.
        It saves the court time as well as the taxpayer's
        money.

        Hope this helps.


        Dr. DHL Haitsuka
        Aaron Alexander Services
        All-Around Services Limited
        PO Box 806
        Aiea, HI 96701-0806




        --- Melinda <mel_dug@...> wrote:

        > what is the difference between guilty plea & no
        > contest
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      • suesarkis@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/20/2005 6:42:43 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, mel_dug@yahoo.com writes: what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest * *
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 20, 2005
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          In a message dated 6/20/2005 6:42:43 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
          mel_dug@... writes:

          what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest


          * * * * *
          Nolo contendre (I do not wish to contend this) aka "no contest" in a
          criminal prosecution means that, without admitting guilt, the defendant is subject
          to conviction as in the case of a guilty plea but that a "no contest" plea
          does not bar denial of the truth of the charges in other proceedings. In other
          words, if you are sued civilly arising out of the same acts, a guilty plea
          can be used to hang you whereby a "no contest" cannot.
          .

          Sincerely yours,
          Sue
          ________________________________________________
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          Sarkis Detective Agency
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          1346 Ethel Street
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          818-242-2505

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        • gregorymcclure@optonline.net
          By pleading no contest you do not admit guilt and therefore no one can use that plea against you in any subsequent trial or hearing whether it is criminal or
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 20, 2005
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            By pleading no contest you do not admit guilt and therefore no one can use
            that plea against you in any subsequent trial or hearing whether it is
            criminal or civil in nature. In a No Contest Plea you admit that the
            allegations contained in the complaint or citation are true, but only for
            the purpose of this hearing.

            Original Message:
            -----------------
            From: Melinda mel_dug@...
            Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 23:54:25 +0000
            To: infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [infoguys-list] shoplifting charges


            what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest







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          • Dave Buchholzer
            Guilty Plea: Subject admits to charged act (criminal/traffic). No Contest: Subject admits to what transpired in act, but usually has excuse/reason why he/she
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 21, 2005
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              Guilty Plea: Subject admits to charged act (criminal/traffic).

              No Contest: Subject admits to what transpired in act, but usually has
              excuse/reason why he/she acted in such a manner.



              David Buchholzer

              D.L.B. & Associates Investigations

              148 Barberry Drive

              Berea, OH 44017

              PH (440) 260-7567

              FAX (440) 260-7568

              dlbcando@...

              www.dlb-invest.com

              _____

              From: infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com [mailto:infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of Melinda
              Sent: Monday, June 20, 2005 7:54 PM
              To: infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [infoguys-list] shoplifting charges



              what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest







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            • oracleintl@aol.com
              In a message dated 6/20/2005 9:42:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, mel_dug@yahoo.com writes: what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest For
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 21, 2005
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                In a message dated 6/20/2005 9:42:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                mel_dug@... writes:

                what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest



                For purposes of the criminal charge the defendant is facing in the instant
                case - essentially none except that they are not required to allocute, which
                means to formally acknowledge their guilt and explain their behavior.

                People often believe that defendants enter a "No Contest" plea in order to
                avoid a guilty plea, but that is only part of the truth. While it does allow
                you to otherwise and otherwheres maintain your innocence . By entering a "No
                Contest" plea, you avoid the possibility of a jury verdict, you avoid the
                expense and stress of a trial and you have the possibility of a favorable Plea
                Agreement without admitting guilt. That can be pretty attractive if you know
                very well that they are going to convict you.

                One thing you do not get is the sentencing consideration for "acceptance of
                responsibility" following allocution.

                Our system values "closure." If some mutt is charged with murdering your
                loved one, it is not enough that the person gets convicted - you never know for
                sure that the guilty person has been apprehended and punished. When the
                person allocutes their guilt, explains what they did, how they did it and why,
                and then answers the relevant questions posed by the Court, it helps close the
                door for victims, families and other interested parties including those
                involved in the prosecution - not the least of which is the Judge.

                Put yourself in a Judge's position. Do you really want to sentence a person
                who says nothing more than "I don't choose to defend this case." How about
                the person who launched a vigorous defense but got convicted?

                When a person pleads No Contest, they deny everyone involved that "peace of
                mind," and they lose the consideration for it in those cases where acceptance
                of responsibility matters.

                Hope this helps.

                Bill E. Branscum, Investigator
                Oracle International
                _www.FraudsAndScams.com_ (http://www.FraudsAndScams.com)
                _www.OracleInternational.com_ (http://www.OracleInternational.com)
                PO Box 10728
                Naples, FL 34101
                (239) 304-1639
                (239) 304-1640 Fax
                Illegitimi non carborundum







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              • lorraine bennett
                ,, Dave, The no contest plea is not as you said. The correct definition is as clear as its title. A defendant agrees that the jurisdiction has enough evidence
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 6, 2005
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                  ,,
                  Dave,
                  The no contest plea is not as you said. The correct definition is as clear as its title. A defendant agrees that the jurisdiction has enough evidence to obtain a conviction. There would be "no contest" in trying to prove otherwise. The defedant accepts that and without admitting guilt enters this ad in return gets the same ealty as a guilty verdict, whether by pea or a verdict.
                  Your description is closer to a common plea in traffic courts when a defendant pleads with mitigating circumstances.
                  Such as a speeding vioation. A defendant admits to the offense but has a viable excuse; Thank God you're a dic and not a defense lawyer.
                  BLACK RAIN

                  Dave Buchholzer <db111451@...> wrote:
                  Guilty Plea: Subject admits to charged act (criminal/traffic).

                  No Contest: Subject admits to what transpired in act, but usually has
                  excuse/reason why he/she acted in such a manner.



                  David Buchholzer

                  D.L.B. & Associates Investigations

                  148 Barberry Drive

                  Berea, OH 44017

                  PH (440) 260-7567

                  FAX (440) 260-7568

                  dlbcando@...

                  www.dlb-invest.com

                  _____

                  From: infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com [mailto:infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com]
                  On Behalf Of Melinda
                  Sent: Monday, June 20, 2005 7:54 PM
                  To: infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [infoguys-list] shoplifting charges



                  what is the difference between guilty plea & no contest







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