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Re: Jacko's Jury Consultant

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  • romulusredux
    Anagram, shranagram, the reference is to a real book now on a best seller list. Part of the review is as follows: Editorial Reviews Amazon.com One of the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 18, 2005
      Anagram, shranagram, the reference is to a real book now on a best
      seller list. Part of the review is as follows:

      Editorial Reviews Amazon.com
      "One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so
      much bulls""t," Harry G. Frankfurt writes, in what must surely be the
      most eyebrow-raising opener in modern philosophical prose. "Everyone
      knows this. Each of us contributes his share. But we tend to take the
      situation for granted." This compact little book, as pungent as the
      phenomenon it explores, attempts to articulate a theory of this
      contemporary scourge--what it is, what it does, and why there's so
      much of it. The result is entertaining and enlightening in almost
      equal measure. It can't be denied; part of the book's charm is the
      puerile pleasure of reading classic academic discourse punctuated at
      regular intervals by the word "bullsh""t." More pertinent is
      Frankfurt's focus on intentions--the practice of bullshit, rather than
      its end result. Bullsh""""ng, as he notes, is not exactly lying, and
      bullshit remains bulls""t whether it's true or false. The difference
      lies in the bullsh"""er's complete disregard for whether what he's
      saying corresponds to facts in the physical world: he "does not reject
      the authority of the truth, as the liar does, and oppose himself to
      it. He pays no attention to it at all. By virtue of this, bullshit is
      a greater enemy of the truth than lies are."

      --- In infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com, tammy McPherson
      <tamisuemcp@s...> wrote:
      > "Harry G. Frankfurt".. "Your anagrams are showing Dr. Lector"... LOL.
      >
      >
      >
      By Lucky Irreg. LOL.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > romulusredux <romulusredux@y...> wrote:
      > The winning side wins again. Justice be damned.
      >
      > The jury "consultant" (read jury manipulator) then sugar coats the
      > process, as if all they wanted was to do the right thing.
      >
      > Well Isn't that Precious!
      >
      > Lex
      >
      > Recommended reading: On Bullsh*t by Harry G Frankfurt, Princetn
      > University Press
      >
      >
      > --- In infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com, Jurydoctor@a... wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Wednesday, June 15, 2005
      > >
      > > Same jury consultant helped win Jacko, Haidl trials
      > >
      > > Inside the Jacko and Haidl jury selection with the woman who did
      both.
      > >
      > > FRANK MICKADEIT
      > > Register columnist
      > >
      > > fmickadeit@o...
      > >
      > > What could the Haidl II and Jacko trials possibly have in common?
      > >
      > > Lee Meihls, a private jury consultant who worked for the winning
      > side in
      > > both.
      > >
      > > I caught up with her yesterday, and we talked about her strategy in
      > each
      > > case.
      > >
      > > In Haidl, she and prosecutor Chuck Middleton were in agreement
      > about 90
      > > percent of the time, but it was important, she said, that they
      > thoroughly
      > > discussed
      > > prospective jurors they initially disagreed on.
      > >
      > > Remember Haidl Juror No. 1, the heavily tattooed guy in his late
      > 20s who was
      > > later elected foreman? He was a key pick, Meihls said, because he
      > didn't fit
      > > the stereotypical "prosecution" juror, and the defense let him
      get in.
      > >
      > > "The defense probably thought he was golden," she said, "but if you
      > looked
      > > at
      > > him closely, you saw someone who took a great deal of personal
      > > responsibility
      > > in his life."
      > >
      > > And that was the key to picking the entire Haidl jury, she said,
      > because the
      > > "theme of the trial was not that Jane Doe didn't say 'no' (the
      defense
      > > argument), it was that she didn't say 'yes,' and that's a subtle
      > > distinction."
      > >
      > > So she searched for jurors whose backgrounds indicated they took
      > strict
      > > responsibility for their actions, and wouldn't be afraid to send to
      > prison
      > > three
      > > young men who didn't take responsibility for theirs â€" even if
      > they "looked
      > > like
      > > choirboys."
      > >
      > > It was easier to pick the Haidl jury than the Jackson one, she
      > said, because
      > > Haidl Judge F. P. Briseño OKd 100 questions on the written
      > questionnaire for
      > > prospective jurors and allowed lengthy oral questioning. Jackson's
      > judge
      > > allowed just 41 written questions and five minutes of oral
      questioning.
      > >
      > > There was little to go on, and a lot was just gut instinct.
      Meihls and
      > > Jackson attorney Thomas Mesereau agreed that the kind of juror they
      > wanted
      > > was
      > > someone "who would be able to focus only on this accuser in this
      case."
      > >
      > > They were also looking for personal traits that indicated they
      > could form a
      > > cohesive group with others. "We wanted an acquittal, not a hung
      > jury," she
      > > said.
      > >
      > > They looked for jurors who appeared "cautious, who could believe a
      > kid could
      > > make up something so terrible." Also, people who showed that if
      > they were
      > > either creative themselves, or could appreciate Jackson's
      > creativity â€"
      > > because,
      > > she said, "where are you going to find people who (identify with)
      his
      > > eccentricities?"
      > >
      > > There was some criticism before the verdict that the defense had
      > OKd a jury
      > > dominated by women and parents, but that was by intent.
      > >
      > > "We felt women might be harder on the accuser's mother than men
      > would be,
      > > and
      > > we also wanted parents who could believe kids could tell a whopper
      > or be
      > > influenced by peers to."
      > >
      > > Jackson himself had a lot to say about jury selection, and Meihls
      and
      > > Mesereau listened. Jackson, they felt, has great intuition and the
      > ability
      > > to read
      > > people. They wanted people who Jackson felt liked him, and whom
      > Jackson
      > > liked.
      > > The former seems obvious, but the latter, she said, was important,
      > too,
      > > because
      > > "people aren't always aware of nonverbal signals they give off."
      > >
      > > In other words, Jackson's body language in court and the way he
      > looked at
      > > jurors were sending signals that jurors could pick up on.
      > >
      > > But Jackson at times had to be convinced that someone wasn't a good
      > juror
      > > just because she liked his music or owned "Thriller." One
      > 50-year-old woman
      > > said
      > > she liked Jackson's music, and he was smitten. It turned out,
      > though, she
      > > had
      > > a lot of friends in law enforcement in Santa Barbara County, and
      > Jackson was
      > > finally persuaded to let her go.
      > >
      > > Meihls also thinks she got a jury that was at least subconsciously
      > concerned
      > > about sending to prison a man whom they saw "wasting away" as the
      > trial wore
      > >
      > > on.
      > >
      > > Contrast that to Greg Haidl, who noticeably gained weight while on
      > trial and
      > > eating that good jailhouse food.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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