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strange death-comment

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  • Jurydoctor@aol.com
    There is no fault to the manufacturer, the equipotent was sold USED and AS IS. There is no fault to Mr Ranger, he was only securing his load as he should have.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 29, 2005
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      There is no fault to the manufacturer, the
      equipotent was sold USED and AS IS.

      There is no fault to Mr Ranger, he was only securing his load as he should
      have.

      The fault to Mr. Ralph and Mr. Fuge is equal.
      Mr. Fuge should have made sure that the safety equipment was properly
      operating before allowing the machinery to be used in the yard.
      Mr. Ralph as a heavy equipment operator was trained and licensed or should
      have been and should have refused to operate an unsafe peace of machinery or
      used extra caution knowing the safety fetchers were not operating.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • IanC
      ... I beg to differ slightly; As if you hit upon the manufacturer s web site they allow you to see what they are selling,, allow you to input a serial number
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 31, 2005
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        > From: Jurydoctor@... [mailto:Jurydoctor@...]
        >
        > There is no fault to the manufacturer, the equipotent was
        > sold USED and AS IS.


        I beg to differ slightly;
        As if you hit upon the manufacturer's web site they allow you to see what
        they are selling,, allow you to input a serial number of an old equipment,,
        but they do not list anywhere there anything related to you being able to
        download 'Operating Instructions' regarding anything they sell (or have
        sold).

        That's a lack of responsibility in my (personal) opinion - but of course
        wasn't the cause of the accident.


        > There is no fault to Mr Ranger, he was only securing his load
        > as he should have.


        He cold have also been walking to the trackhoe driver to ask "Where's your
        mirror's? Why wave at me? Don't you have a working horn?"


        > The fault to Mr. Ralph and Mr. Fuge is equal.
        > Mr. Fuge should have made sure that the safety equipment was
        > properly operating before allowing the machinery to be used
        > in the yard.
        > Mr. Ralph as a heavy equipment operator was trained and
        > licensed or should have been and should have refused to
        > operate an unsafe peace of machinery or used extra caution
        > knowing the safety fetchers were not operating.


        Yes.. I agree with that too.


        Problem I had with this example is that I don't know what a trackhoe is.
        More importantly (whilst I realize it digs things) I did not know it's size
        (model type).

        Reason why I bring this up is because I can clearly see (upon the
        manufacturer's web site) that the 'big ones' do have mirrors, but their
        smaller ones do not.

        Electronic horns are not standard neither (but I realize these may be in
        regards to warning of low oil pressure or whatever) but back in the day that
        particular machine was built,, were mirrors or horns standard equipment?


        Interesting case.

        Best Regards - Ian
        (My 127.0.0.1 is secure)
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