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Re: Zelda

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  • Jurydoctor@aol.com
    Hi folks, seems as though I have my email back again.. (thank Goodness) I was able to read but not post.. anyhoo trial is on Monday.. help me please.. thanks,
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 24, 2004
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      Hi folks,
      seems as though I have my email back again.. (thank Goodness) I was able to
      read but not post..
      anyhoo trial is on Monday.. help me please..
      thanks,
      Amy
      ps. boy did I miss you guys
      Fifty year old Zelda and her family went to a very luxurious spa.
      She and her daughters (Erica and Ann) signed up for an "intermediate" bike
      ride (some hills).
      She told the guide that she had not been on a bike in "30 years" did not know
      how to ride a bike with gears or a hand brake.
      While trying the bike 2 things happened:
      1. she asked for a different bike
      2. she fell off of the bike while in the parking lot.
      She again relayed her fears to the guide, who told her she could handle it..
      so she went.

      Zelda came upon a little a hill sloping downward, followed by a bridge. She
      didn't brake or down shift, and fell off the bike.. she broke every bone in her
      face (she was wearing a helmet)
      She is suing the spa for negligent supervision and believes she never should
      have been allowed to ride that particular trail.

      She believes that she fell off the bike either due to her inability to ride
      safely on that terrain and/or gravel in the road.
      Her oldest daughter, Erica claims that the guide told them to ignore
      instructions that were posted by the little bridges which instructed bicyclists to
      walk the bikes on the bridges.
      Ann remembers the signs that say stop at bridges but believes that was the
      first bridge that they came to and does not remember stopping. Both girls claim
      that nobody walked their bikes across the bridges. The spa did not retain
      records of other folks in the group that day.

      The defense claims that regardless of terrain.. we do not know what caused
      Zelda to fall off the bike (lose her bablance) and ability level has nothing to
      do with her fall.

      Plaintiff''s analogy is similar to a downhill skier, who hasn't skied in 30
      years: they should start with a beginner trail and work their way up to an
      intermediate ski trail under the watchful eye of the instructor.

      The defense says this was a guide not an instructor, but given the analogy,
      if a skier hits some ice, regardless of level, there are circumstances in which
      even advanced skiers can get hurt (assumption of the risk)
      what do you think?


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jurydoctor@aol.com
      Here s a little brain teaser for ya!! thanks, Amy Fifty year old Zelda and her family went to a very luxurious spa. She and her daughters (Erica and Ann)
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 24, 2004
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        Here's a little brain teaser for ya!!
        thanks,
        Amy


        Fifty year old Zelda and her family went to a very luxurious spa.
        She and her daughters (Erica and Ann) signed up for an "intermediate" bike
        ride (some hills).
        She told the guide that she had not been on a bike in "30 years" did not know
        how to ride a bike with gears or a hand brake.
        While trying the bike 2 things happened:
        1. she asked for a different bike
        2. she fell off of the bike while in the parking lot.
        She again relayed her fears to the guide, who told her she could handle it..
        so she went.

        Zelda came upon a little a hill sloping downward, followed by a bridge. She
        didn't brake or down shift, and fell off the bike.. she broke every bone in
        her
        face (she was wearing a helmet)
        She is suing the spa for negligent supervision and believes she never should
        have been allowed to ride that particular trail.

        She believes that she fell off the bike either due to her inability to ride
        safely on that terrain and/or gravel in the road.
        Her oldest daughter, Erica claims that the guide told them to ignore
        instructions that were posted by the little bridges which instructed
        bicyclists to
        walk the bikes on the bridges.
        Ann remembers the signs that say stop at bridges but believes that was the
        first bridge that they came to and does not remember stopping. Both girls
        claim
        that nobody walked their bikes across the bridges. The spa did not retain
        records of other folks in the group that day.

        The defense claims that regardless of terrain.. we do not know what caused
        Zelda to fall off the bike (lose her bablance) and ability level has nothing
        to
        do with her fall.

        Plaintiff''s analogy is similar to a downhill skier, who hasn't skied in 30
        years: they should start with a beginner trail and work their way up to an
        intermediate ski trail under the watchful eye of the instructor.

        The defense says this was a guide not an instructor, but given the analogy,
        if a skier hits some ice, regardless of level, there are circumstances in
        which
        even advanced skiers can get hurt (assumption of the risk)
        what do you think?


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wallstreetpi@aol.com
        Went over to AOL 3-4 years ago...............very happy. Ray [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 28, 2004
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          Went over to AOL 3-4 years ago...............very happy.

          Ray


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • wallstreetpi@aol.com
          Some times getting older is bitter, but sweet. Ray [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 28, 2004
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            Some times getting older is bitter, but sweet.

            Ray


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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