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A truly feel good redemption story - given a 2nd chance

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  • suesarkis2001
    August 07, 2013 Unusual Law Clerk Hire for D.C. Circuit Judge Janice Rogers Brown Shon Hopwood s unique career in the law has taken a dramatic new turn. The
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 7, 2013
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      August 07, 2013

      Unusual Law Clerk Hire for D.C. Circuit Judge Janice Rogers Brown


      Shon Hopwood's unique career in the law has taken a dramatic new turn. The
      onetime jailhouse lawyer who served time in federal prison for robbing
      banks has been hired as a 2014 law clerk for Judge Janice Rogers Brown of the
      prestigious U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.
      "I'm amazed at the opportunities and second chances I have been given,"
      said Hopwood Wednesday after returning home to Seattle from his interview with
      Brown on Monday. Hopwood said the judge offered him the job soon after the
      interview. "I quickly said yes."
      While in Washington, D.C. Hopwood, 38, also visited former solicitor
      general Seth Waxman, who has been something of a mentor to Hopwood for more than
      a decade. They made contact after a certiorari petition Hopwood wrote for a
      fellow inmate while in prison was granted review by the Supreme Court. The
      2004 case was Fellers v. United States. Hopwood chronicled his experiences
      in the _2012 book_
      (http://www.amazon.com/Law-Man-Robbing-Winning-Redemption/dp/0307887839) Law Man: My Story of Robbing Banks, Winning Supreme
      Court Cases, and Finding Redemption.

      After a post-prison stint with Cockle Law Brief Printing Company in
      Nebraska, Hopwood has been a student for the last two years at University of
      Washington School of Law. Last summer he interned for a federal district court
      judge in Seattle, and this summer he has been working in the federal public
      defender's office, also in Seattle. Hopwood said that partly because of the
      budget cuts caused by sequestration, he has appeared in court for
      sentencing and other proceedings more often than fellow students working at law
      firms. Hopwood is scheduled to graduate from law school next summer.
      Luckily, Hopwood said he has taken a course in administrative law, which
      will help him at the D.C. Circuit, whose docket is heavy with regulatory
      disputes. He described Judge Brown as "incredibly personable" but would not
      divulge details of his conversation with her. Brown declined comment.
      After his year with Judge Brown, will Hopwood follow in the footsteps of
      other D.C. Circuit clerks and apply for a Supreme Court clerkship? "I haven't
      given that any thought at all," he said, sounding surprised at the
      question. "I'm taking it one step at a time, and I'm still in a state of shock."




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