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Fwd: Census records are now searchable by name

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  • S.R.
    Colleagues: Of interest to us all. Steven. (Steven Rambam, CFE, CPP, PSP, PCI, CSAR, Director.) (for: Pallorium, Inc.) direct email: rambam@pallorium.com ...
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 6, 2012
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      Colleagues:

      Of interest to us all.

      Steven.

      (Steven Rambam, CFE, CPP, PSP, PCI, CSAR, Director.)
      (for: Pallorium, Inc.)

      direct email: rambam@...



      Begin forwarded message:

      > Subject: Census records are now searchable by name
      >
      > photos below. Also, 1915 and 1925 New York State censuses posted
      > online today for the first time searchable by name.
      >
      >
      >
      > � 1940 CENSUS-BY NAME
      >
      >
      > NEW YORK � Americans are in for a cyber-surprise on Wednesday:
      > They'll be able to plug family names into an online 1940 U.S. census
      > and come up with details about the lives of New Yorkers � from Joe
      > DiMaggio and Jacqueline Kennedy to their own relatives. Census
      > experts say the New York data are of national interest because tens
      > of millions of Americans have roots in this gateway to the nation
      > through Ellis Island, and many can now dig for more personal
      > information. By Verena Dobnik and Randy Herschaft.
      >
      >
      > AP photos.
      >
      >
      >
      > http://yhoo.it/Nhm30n
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > 1940 NY census records are now searchable by name
      > By RANDY HERSCHAFT and VERENA DOBNIK | Associated Press � 1 hr 47
      > mins ago
      >
      >
      > NEW YORK (AP) � Americans are in for a cyber-surprise on Wednesday:
      > They'll be able to plug family names into an online 1940 U.S. census
      > and come up with details about the lives of New Yorkers � from Joe
      > DiMaggio and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy to their own relatives.
      > Starting after midnight, it will no longer be essential to provide
      > exact addresses from seven decades ago to look for a New
      > Yorkconnection.
      > With names, free searches of the 1940 U.S. census first made public
      > in April will unlock personal information about residents of New
      > York � then the largest U.S. state and an immigrant hub from which
      > people moved all over the country.
      > Census experts say the New York data is of national interest because
      > tens of millions of Americans have roots in this gateway to the
      > United States through Ellis Island, and many can now dig for more
      > personal information.
      > "That's the exciting aspect about this � the ability to search the
      > lifetime of our mothers and fathers," said Debra Braverman, a New
      > York-based independent forensic genealogist with clients seeking
      > information for trust funds and estates.
      > When the census was first released, "if you didn't know exactly
      > where someone lived in 1940, you couldn't find them," Braverman said.
      > Indexing by name is crucial to cracking the until-now closed book of
      > that year's census, which by law could not be released for 72 years
      > and is therefore the most recently available one.
      > This U.S. census leads to China.
      > Some of the work of transcribing handwritten census records into a
      > computerized index was done by workers in an office outside the
      > southern city of Dongguan with "very strong character recognition
      > abilities," said Todd Jensen, who heads the document preservation
      > service at Ancestry.com, a Provo, Utah-based family history company
      > that's releasing the online New York census for 1940 using their new
      > name index.
      > "Given the complexity of their own language, reading and recognizing
      > characters from other languages comes easier," he said.
      > Also Wednesday, another historic treasure trove appears on the
      > Internet for the first time: census information compiled separately
      > by New York state for 1915 and 1925, indexed by name. These records
      > include details about famed personalities such as Lauren Bacall, Al
      > Capone, Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Houdini, who according to the
      > 1925 census was born in the United States, even though most
      > biographies say he was born in Hungary.
      > The interest in roots is so intense that 37 million hits temporarily
      > crashed the National Archives provider site when the 1940 census was
      > released on April 2. Many who logged on hoping for results hit the
      > wall, frustrated for lack of specific locations required for results.
      > Braverman, a Manhattan resident, uncovered details about her 84-year-
      > old father's family because he remembered his family's Brooklyn
      > address before his bar mitzvah in 1940, when he was 13.
      > "His memory was spot on," his daughter said.
      > But the Brooklyn childhood address her mother remembered didn't
      > match, so they will try to find the information again this week.
      > Former New York Mayor Ed Koch hit the jackpot when it came to his
      > family history, which is contained in all three censuses � the
      > federal one, as well as the New York ones from 1915 and 1925.
      > The 87-year-old Koch participated in a preview search conducted by
      > Ancestry.com, which is making all three census records available
      > online.
      > His said his father came from Europe, alone at age 16, eventually
      > raising a family in a Bronx apartment. For years, "I told people
      > that we lived in abject poverty," he said. A series of census
      > records from the time would prove him wrong.
      > They showed that the Depression-era rent for the Kochs' five-room
      > Bronx apartment was $75 a month, "and that was a lot of money at the
      > time," Koch said.
      > "All my life, I was telling people I was very poor, but I learned we
      > did not live in abject poverty; I was born into a middle-class
      > family," he said.
      > The New York world of the 1940 census includes names that later
      > became famous, including Katharine Hepburn, John D. Rockefeller Jr.,
      > J.D. Salinger, Kennedy and Ella Fitzgerald.
      > The 1940 census by name index will be available for all states
      > possibly as early as this fall.
      > While New York is the biggest state whose census records are already
      > name-indexed, a number of smaller states also have been made name-
      > accessible by Ancestry.com and two other companies, FamilySearch.org
      > and MyHeritage.com.
      > New York state censuses for 1915 and 1925 are available online for
      > the first time via a link that says "find family history for free"
      > to anyone providing a New York ZIP code and email address.
      > The state censuses show "every New Yorker from the famous to the
      > infamous to everybody in between," said Kathleen Roe, director of
      > archives and records management at the New York State Archives.
      > A perfect example of this melting pot is Babe Ruth, who appeared in
      > the 1925 census as "George H. Ruth" and listed his occupation as
      > "Base Ballplayer." He was living by the Grand Concourse near Yankee
      > Stadium, which would later be dubbed "The House That Ruth Built."
      > The Ruth family neighbor was Joseph Weinstock, an Austrian immigrant
      > working in manufacturing and his Russian-born wife, the census shows.
      > "So here was the future American baseball hero living next door to
      > an immigrant family making it in the United States," Roe said. "What
      > a great American story! And that's what you can find out walking
      > through a neighborhood with census records."
      > The censuses released this week offer "one of the greatest
      > collections of historic voices you'll ever find," said Roe, adding
      > that if read together, they trace whole families as they move around.
      > The census data also include such information as occupation, whether
      > immigrants were naturalized citizens, and whether they owned or
      > rented their homes � in other words, sketches of communities, said
      > David M. Kleiman, president of Heritage Muse Inc., a New York-based
      > genealogy technology firm.
      > "What we're all looking for is the story of the family � what made
      > my grandparents the way they were, which made my parents the way
      > they were, which made me what I am," he said.
      > ___
      > Ancestry.com: www.ancestry.com/newyork
      > New York State Archives: www.archives.nysed.gov
      > ___
      > Follow Verena Dobnik at http://www.twitter.com/VerenaChirps and
      > Randy Herschaft at http://twitter.com/HerschaftAP
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > This detail of an image taken from microfilm and provided by
      > Ancestry.com shows a section of a page from the 1925 New York State
      > census with an entry for George H. Ruth, fifth from top. George H.
      > "Babe" Ruth is one of many notable New Yorkers who will be
      > searchable online by name when the 1915 and 1925 New York States
      > censuses and the 1940 U.S. Census become searchable by family name
      > at midnight, June 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Ancestry.com)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > This image taken from microfilm and provided by Ancestry.com shows a
      > detail of a ledger page from the 1925 New York State census with
      > entries for Harry and Beatrice Houdini. Magician Harry Houdini is
      > one of the many notable New Yorkers who will be searchable online by
      > name when the 1915 and 1925 New York States censuses pluethe 1940
      > U.S. Census become searchable by family name at midnight, June 5,
      > 2012. (AP Photo/Ancestry.com)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > This image taken from microfilm and provided by Ancestry.com shows a
      > detail of a page from the 1915 New York State Census with the family
      > of barber Gabriel Capone. Capone's son, Alfonse, listed third from
      > the bottom, went on to be one of the most notorious organized crime
      > figures of the Twentieth Century. He is one of many notable New
      > Yorkers who will be searchable online by name when the 1915 and 1925
      > New York States censuses and the 1940 U.S. Census become searchable
      > by family name at midnight, June 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Ancestry.com)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > Independent forensic genealogist Debra Braverman poses with a
      > photograph of her grandparents, Harry and Edith Braverman, her
      > father Sidney, and his younger brother Donald, Tuesday, June 5,
      > 2012, in New York. Braverman located her family's data in the 1940
      > census data earlier this year when her now 84 year-old father
      > remembered his 1940 street address. After midnight Wednesday,
      > Americans will be able to plug family names into an online 1940 U.S.
      > census and come up with details about the lives of New Yorkers -
      > from Joe DiMaggio and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy to their own
      > relatives. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
      >
      > Summary
      >
      > Date: 06/05/2012 08:09 PM
      > Slug: 1940 Census-By Name
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > In this April 6, 2012 photo provided by Ancestry.com, clerical
      > workers in Dongguan, China decipher English script on handwritten
      > census forms so that the data from the 1940 U.S. Census can be
      > entered and searchable online. After midnight Wednesday, June 6,
      > 2012, Americans will be able to plug family names into an online
      > 1940 U.S. census and come up with details about the lives of New
      > Yorkers - from Joe DiMaggio and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy to their
      > own relatives. (AP Photo/Ancestry.com, Todd Jensen)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > Independent forensic genealogist Debra Braverman shows the census
      > data for her grandparents Harry and Edith Braverman, her father
      > Sidney, and his younger brother Donald, Tuesday, June 5, 2012, in
      > New York, after locating their data in the 1940 census data the day
      > after it was put online. Braverman located her family's names when
      > her now 84-year-old father remembered his 1940 street address. After
      > midnight Wednesday, Americans will be able to plug family names into
      > an online 1940 U.S. census and come up with details about the lives
      > of New Yorkers - from Joe DiMaggio and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy to
      > their own relatives. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > This image taken from microfilm and provided by Ancestry.com shows
      > two pages from the 1925 New York State Census with an entry for
      > George H. Ruth, shown eighth from the bottom on the left hand side.
      > George H. "Babe" Ruth is one of many notable New Yorkers who will be
      > searchable online by name when the 1915 and 1925 New York States
      > censuses and the 1940 U.S. Census become searchable by family name
      > at midnight, June 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Ancestry.com)
      >
      > Summary
      >
      >
      > Date: 06/05/2012 08:23 PM
      > Slug: 1940 Census By Name
      > Headline:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > This image taken from microfilm and provided by Ancestry.com shows a
      > detail from a 1940 U.S. Census ledger page with an entry for
      > Jacqueline Bouvier, second from top. Bouvier, who became Jacqueline
      > Kennedy when she married John F. Kennedy, is one of the many notable
      > New Yorkers whose name will come up electronically if searched on
      > the Internet when the 1940 U.S. Census becomes searchable by family
      > names at midnight, Wednesday, June 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Ancestry.com)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > This image taken from microfilm and provided by Ancestry.com shows
      > two pages from the 1925 New York State Census that include an entry
      > for Edward Koch, appearing at the top of the page at right. Koch,
      > who went on to practice law and become the mayor of New York City,
      > is one of many notable New Yorkers who will be searchable online by
      > name when the 1915 and 1925 New York States censuses and the 1940
      > U.S. Census become searchable by family name at midnight, June 5,
      > 2012. (AP Photo/Ancestry.com)
      >
      > Summary
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Copyright 2012, The Associated Press
      >
      > Caption
      >
      > FILE- In this file photo provided by the National Archives at
      > College Park, an enumerator interviews a woman for the 1940 Census.
      > The 1940 U.S. Census plus the 1915 and 1925 New York Censuses will
      > be searchable online by family name, without needing often forgotten
      > addresses from seven decades ago. (AP Photo/National Archives at
      > College Park, File)
      >
      >






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      Brooklyn, New York 11230 USA
      (001) 212-969-0286
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      TWITTER: @pallorium and @stevenrambam
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