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infant's blood pressure

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  • Jurydoctor@aol.com
    I will have my assistant ask the arbitrator. but remember a jury would not be able to google this or anything. However, if you dig up some stuff (using your
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 5, 2010
      I will have my assistant ask the arbitrator. but remember a jury would not be able to google this or anything. However, if you dig up some stuff (using your super powers) I'd certainloy
      like to know about it. I will send the info private email to u
      thanks
      amy



      This is definitely a case where knowing too little will cause us all to
      ive bad opinions.

      ince you are describing the device as an invasive blood pressure monitor
      hile describing an IV drip monitor, it would truly help to know the precise
      name of the monitor in question. Since the already filed case is public
      ecord, you would not be violating any privacy issues.





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    • suesarkis@aol.com
      Amy - I sure hope you are working for the defense on this one. Although it would have been nice to know how long Robbie was in the hospital, i.e., was he
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 5, 2010
        Amy -

        I sure hope you are working for the defense on this one.

        Although it would have been nice to know how long Robbie was in the
        hospital, i.e., was he neonatal and still there or was this a newly discovered
        cardiovascular issue at 6 months of age. Regardless, you are talking about
        two separate mechanisms. Without reading the chart it is very hard to say
        what the doctor actually ordered. However, meds to be dispensed via IV at
        the rate of 30 ml/hr are usually drip unless the doctor orders bolus. I'm
        at a loss as to why the nursing staff did not realize the infusion pump would
        be required even without reading the instructions since there was no drip
        chamber. HOWEVER, since this a new device, failure to read same wreaks of
        total carelessness on the part of the staff.

        Nurses in the neonatal/pediatric ICU would not usually be privy to what the
        adult unit does or does not require. Even so, considering the difference
        between a baby's heart and an adults, common sense should have dictated.

        The 4 years between incidents tends to lend credibility to the fact that
        the directions/instructions have been adequate sans carelessness.

        I also fault the hospital and staff including the purchasing agent for not
        insisting that a company tech be on site to demonstrate the use of the
        equipment if they were unfamiliar with something so very important.


        95______________% nurses

        5_______________% mDM

        100%

        4. Should properly trained pediatric ICU nurses should know how to use an
        infusion pump with this type of device? MOST DEFINITELY !!!! Howe
        ver, the key words here are "properly trained" and for that, no one can be
        blamed but the hospital.




        Sincerely yours,
        Sue
        ________________________
        Sue Sarkis
        Sarkis Detective Agency

        (est. 1976)
        PI 6564
        _www.sarkispi.com_ (http://www.sarkispi.com/)

        1346 Ethel Street
        Glendale, CA 91207-1826
        818-242-2505

        "one Nation under God" and "in GOD we TRUST"

        If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you can read it in English,
        thank a military veteran


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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