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blinded by anesthesia-comments

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  • Jurydoctor@aol.com
    Probably the plaintiff, but this is the type of case that depends on the specific facts and the quality of the expert opinions and the jury, of course. Yes,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 20, 2007
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      Probably the plaintiff, but this is the type of case that depends on the
      specific facts and the quality of the expert opinions and the jury, of
      course.
      Yes, normally keeping the BP within 20% of baseline is adequate, however, if
      that baseline is already too low, it must be kept at a level where perfusion
      of all organs is maintained. A student is probably not knowledable enough
      to
      manage a case where such narrow parameters are required and may even have
      masked important signs by overmedicating. My guess is the surgeon may
      likely
      have been a student, as well, and should be included in the suit. The
      reason
      for an allegedly uncomplicated back procedure needs to be explored. The
      specific procedure wasn't mentioned, which is important. Yes, in a teaching
      hospital you normally have students [which is why I would never be admitted
      in
      one], but if she was told otherwise, then it should have happened according
      to
      their agreement. Ideally, that should have been in writing somewhere, but
      if
      they admit it, the attorney should be able to take care of that issue. That
      said, the consent usually authorizes all the affiliates of the MDs to
      participate, so unless she changed that and/or has no witness to the
      agreement, it
      will be difficult. I have found in many medical records from teaching
      hospitals that the attending MD dictates that he/she was present during an
      entire
      procedure or whatever. It's CYA documentation and may or may not be able to
      be verified by nursing records and other MD notes. ABGs aren't always SOC,
      but once you have an abnormal result, it can't be ignored. Oxygen
      saturation
      monitoring is SOC, but wouldn't have shown the acidosis.

      ___________________

      I don't see any malpractice, I see the inherent risks of elective surgery.
      She didn't have to go through it, and every surgery has risks, up to and
      including death. Be thankful only your sight is gone. There is no evidence
      that
      her belief there would be no students involved and the fact that a student
      was
      involved had any bearing. First, the student was trained. Students practice
      just like doctors. Secondly, how selfish is she that she feels only "Board
      Certified Practitioners" should work on her? As a minister she should be
      open to
      encouraging students and their pursuit to achieve the skills God wanted them
      to have. How do Doctors learn? PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE. The student was
      supervised. 5 times in 7 hours right? It was like the student was rouge AND
      that there were no other medical professionals in the OR. As for the non
      Board Certified guy who sucked so bad he has to be retrained, Board
      Certification
      isn't MANDATORY. Some people just can't test well. The GATE program in
      schools doesn't address the intelligence and gifts of children with ADHD.
      His
      record is a red-herring. Is he licensed to practice medicine? Yes or No?
      ____________________


      I am in favor of the plaintiff. It is clear that the
      hospital/doctors/anesthegiologists were at fault. She should receive a substantial settlement and
      punitive damages. Matter of fact she should own the hospital. Poor, poor care was
      inflicted on this lady.









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