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  • Jurydoctor@aol.com
    In a message dated 2/28/2007 8:43:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, writes: Now this beats all. For starters, what imprecation? There were no cuss words used,
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 28, 2007
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      In a message dated 2/28/2007 8:43:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, writes:
      Now this beats all. For starters, what imprecation? There were no cuss
      words used, no profanity and no ill wishes. The jockey was asked a question and
      he answered "a Q-Ray". The writer, obviously forgetting what was said or
      unable to read his own scroll, wrote "cue ring". Since no one ever heard of a
      cue ring and most people know what a Q-Ray is, it gave the appearance of a
      falsity.

      In what "manner" do you, no name provided, think he spoke?
      ----------
      You've actually answered your own question far better than I could.
      Admittely I should probably have been more specific and said "used the words the
      jockey used," but I thought the meaning was clear enough. The point I was
      getting at (whomever you might be) is that had the word "bracelet" been used instead
      of a brand name - no matter how common that brand name might be - there
      would have been no misquote, in all likelihood no misunderstanding, and no libel.
      That's what I was referring to in saying that the jockey himself "created or
      contributed the situation or circumstance by which the libel occured."


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