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7398Re: 3 is a crowd

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  • mrgfillmore
    Feb 10, 2005
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      Amy, are you not using this forum to help one side or the other in
      these cases pick and sway the jury to help their side win?

      What bothers me is that these techniques are basically a sophisticated
      form of jury tampering. Is that a good thing? many critcs seem to
      feel it's not. I refer you to an editorial review of one book on the
      subject, Stack and Sway, and ask for your comments:

      From Amazon.com: The authors take a critical look at the science of
      jury consultants in Stack and Sway. Using the techniques of modern
      social science, psychology, and market research, jury consultants
      apply sophisticated research methods to figure out the best strategies
      for picking and swaying a jury. This book examines whether the
      industry is effective and it reveals the tricks of the trade. --David
      Marshall Nissman, J.D.

      Product Description:
      A new and largely hidden profession has emerged during the past three
      decades. Drawing on the techniques of modern social science,
      psychology, and market research, its practitioners seek to remake the
      way we pursue justice in the United States. Jury consultants help
      lawyers to pick - some would say "stack" - juries predisposed to
      render the "right" verdict. And consultants apply sophisticated
      research methods to figure out the best strategies for swaying the
      panel. What are we to make of this new and steadily growing industry?
      Do the techniques work?
      IS THIS, AS SOME CRITICS HAVE ARGUED, A NEW FORM OF HIGH-TECH
      JURY-RIGGING, NOT MUCH MORE ACCEPTIBLE THAN CRUDER FORMS OF JURY
      TAMPERING?
      Or do the methods of jury consultants amount to little more than an
      extension of what attorneys have always done? This book will reveal
      the "tricks of the trade" and explore the many ways in which trial
      consultants have infiltrated the courtroom. The authors' purpose is
      not to launch an all-out attack on this growing industry, but rather
      to pull back the curtains, allowing a fair and balanced assessment of
      a new phenomenon in American justice.

      --- In infoguys-list@yahoogroups.com, Jurydoctor@a... wrote:
      >
      > Need your opinion on this case.. all money ($5) per opinion goes to the
      > "cookie fund" (the girls who had to pay 900 bucks for leaving
      cookies at the
      > neighbors) will even mention your name as a contributor if you like..
      > thanks,
      > amy
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